Tag Archives: Multimedia Studies

Call for Chapters – The Digital Media Reader (Closed)

Call for Chapters: The Digital Media Reader

Submission Due Date

15 April 2016 (Closed)

Editor

  • Jonathan Bishop
    • Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, Swansea, Wales.

Book

The Digital Media Reader: Media, Culture, Society an Politics in the Digital Age

Objective

The objective of the book is to bring together the latest research in media practice, identity and culture, and society and politics. Its focus on contemporary digital media and cultures. Chapters will likely relate to contemporary events like the Arab Spring, the Anonymous Movement and Citizen Journalism.

Recommended Topics

The editor welcomes articles, dialogues, notes, book reviews and further comments thereon, in keeping with editorial policy, and areas of interest for this special issue include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Participation inequality; lurking, the free-rider problem
  • Free speech; cyberbantering, cybertrickery, online activism
  • Online harassment; cyberstalking, cyberbulling, porn e-vengers
  • Online deception; grooming, cyberhickery, chatroom bobs
  • Online Community moderation, perspectives on ‘don’t feed the troll’, blocking users (i.e. ban-hammering’)
  • History of new media, Anonymous, the WELL, hacktivism

Submission Procedure

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit papers for this special theme issue on Hypermedia Seduction and Persuasion. All submitted papers will be reviewed on a peer review basis. Papers must follow APA style for reference citations.

NB. Papers can be submitted any time before the deadline, as reviewing will take place throughout the period of the advertising of this call for papers. Successful papers for the special issue will be give a letter of approval so the authors can put their publication on their CVs.

Important Dates

  • Submission Deadline: 15 April 2016
  • Reviews to Authors by: 15 September 2016
  • Final Submissions: 15 November 2017
  • Publication: 1 January 2017

All submissions and inquiries should be directed to the attention of:

Jonathan Bishop FRSA
E-mail: jonathan.bishop@crocels.ac.uk
Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, European Parliament, Brussels, BE.

Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters

Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The rise of online communities in Internet environments has set in motion an unprecedented shift in power from vendors of goods and services to the customers who buy them, with those vendors who understand this transfer of power and choose to capitalize on it by organizing online communities and being richly rewarded with both peerless customer loyalty and impressive economic returns. A type of online community, the virtual world, could radically alter the way people work, learn, grow consume, and entertain. Understanding the exchange of social and economic capital in online communities could involve looking at what causes actors to spend their resources on improving someone else’s reputation. Actors’ reputations may affect others’ willingness to trade with them or give them gifts. Investigating online communities reveals a large number of different characters and associated avatars. When an actor looks at another’s avatar they will evaluate them and make decisions that are crucial to creating interaction between customers and vendors in virtual worlds based on the exchange of goods and services. This paper utilizes the ecological cognition framework to understand transactions, characters and avatars in virtual worlds and investigates the exchange of capital in a bulletin board and virtual. The chapter finds strong evidence for the existence of characters and stereotypes based on the Ecological Cognition Framework and empirical evidence that actors using avatars with antisocial connotations are more likely to have a lower return on investment and be rated less positively than those with more sophisticated appearing avatars.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2013). Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Examining the Concepts, Issues and Implications of Internet Trolling. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-capital-revenue-in-social-networking-communities-building-social-and-economic-relationships-through-avatars-and-characters.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2011). Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters. In: IRMA (Ed.). Virtual Communities: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools and Applications. IGI Global: Hershey, PA; pages 1720-1734. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-capital-revenue-in-social-networking-communities-building-social-and-economic-relationships-through-avatars-and-characters.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2008). Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters. In: C. Romm-Livermore & K. Setzekorn (Eds.). Social Networking Communities and EDating Services: Concepts and Implications. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-capital-revenue-in-social-networking-communities-building-social-and-economic-relationships-through-avatars-and-characters.pdf

Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization  for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online

Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization  for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Chatroom Bobs, which derived from the concept of ‘Uncle Bob’ being a name for a less than responsible family man, are characterised by being online community users driven by seeking out satisfaction for their ‘urgeances’ (or biological drives). Some of these are akin to the ‘office loser’ who tries to impress others but is despised, others have more ulterior motives for sexual satisfaction. This paper presents an intervention – called MEDIAT – which uses TAGTeach to retrain people who are sexually damaged by society and demonstrate impairment in how they interact with others. The paper presents an equation for measuring such ‘social orientation impairment’ as a reflection of its relationship to serotonergic and dopaminergic activity in the prefrontal cortex as a result of differences in ‘Neuro-response plasticity’. The paper concludes that by using MEDIAT to reverse dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity caused by traumatic experience can lead to increased constructive participation in online and other environments.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online. In: 13th International Conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BIOCOMP’12), 16-19 July 2012, USA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/taming-the-chatroom-bob-the-role-of-brain-computer-interfaces-that-manipulate-prefrontal-cortex-optimization-for-increasing-participation-of-victims-of-traumatic-sex-and-other-abuse-online.pdf

Call for Chapters: Examining the Concepts, Issues and Implications of Internet Trolling (Closed)

Editor

Jonathan Bishop, Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems.

Call for Chapters

Proposals Due: 20 July 2012
Acceptance of Proposals: 30 July 2012
Submission Date: 20 August 2012
Final Chapters Due: 20 September 2012

Objective

The aim of this book is to provide current research on the technical approaches as well as more social and behavioral involvements for gaining a better understanding of internet trolling. This book will be useful to researchers, students and practitioners interested in building a share meaning for online community users.

Recommended Topics

  • Regulatory issues: Ethics, anonymity, law and best practice
  • Technical issues; Web security issues, trust, cyber-stalking
  • Changing trolling ‘softly’; Empathy, sympathy, friendliness
  • Multimedia studies; social media, media studies, cyber-culture
  • Modelling: Behavioural and theoretical models
  • Management: artificial intelligence, reputation systems

Please direct all enquiries to:

Jonathan Bishop – jbishop@crocels.com
Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, European Parliament, Brussels, BE.

The role of mediating artifacts in the design of persuasive e-learning systems

The role of mediating artifacts in the design of persuasive e-learning systems

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

E-learning applications are becoming commonplace in the networked classroom, as educators search for new ways of engaging their learners. Traditional methods of designing these systems have focussed the tasks users are likely to complete as opposed to designing them to persuade the user to develop knowledge or learn about topics. Successful e-learning systems allow the user to interact with the environment using mediating artefacts, which are conductors for action within these environments. Mediating artefacts take many forms, in Internet applications they often manifest in the form of text that affords clicking, whereas in graphical environments they are often icons that afford dragging. Many e-learning systems are based around mediating artefacts, but few of these have been designed to encourage learners to carry actions in order to meet their own goals. This paper investigates how mediating artefacts can be made persuasive and suggests a scenario-based design model to aid developers in making e-learning systems persuasive and orientated around the goals of learners.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2005). The role of mediating artifacts in the design of persuasive e-learning systems. In: Proceedings of the First International Conferences on Internet Technologies and Applications, Wrexham: University of Wales Press, pp. 54-62. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-role-of-mediating-artifacts-in-the-design-of-persuasive-e-learning-systems.pdf

Enhancing the understanding of genres of web-based communities: the role of the ecological cognition framework

Enhancing the understanding of genres of web-based communities: The role of the ecological cognition framework

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Web-based communities have been an interest of social science researchers since the dawn of the millennium. To date, much research into them has focused on the methods to enhance community building and understand those who do not participate in community life, known as lurkers. This paper explores web-based communities as a type of media, classifying types of web-based community such as message boards, chat groups and weblogs as genres. A methodology is proposed based on the Ecological Cognition Framework (ECF) for reading these web-based communities in order to determine their genre and subgenre. Utilising both quantitative and qualitative methods to assess the images, text and other artefacts in these web-based communities, two specific sub-genres of the weblogs and directories genre emerge as the political blog and the mommy blog and these are compared with the significant differences that are found between them that make them solid subgenres.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2009). Enhancing the understanding of genres of web-based communities: The role of the ecological cognition framework. International Journal of Web-Based Communities, 5(1), 4-17. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/enhancing-the-understanding-of-genres-of-web-based-communities-the-role-of-the-ecological-cognition-framework.pdf