Tag Archives: Intergenerational Research

The Misrepresentation of Digital Teens as Trolls: Considering Political, News and Feminist Agendas

The Misrepresentation of Digital Teens as Trolls: Considering Political, News and Feminist Agendas

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

If one pays attention to popular culture and the mass media, Internet trolls are unemployed young men in their 20s at home in their parents’ basement spending their time posting abusive messages online. This study finds that this stereotype, whilst common in the mass media, is not representative of the empirical data collected. The research found that most trolling on blogs and defriending is done by women and because of other women. It finds that the people who troll are unlikely to be youths not in education, employment or training (NEETs), but more likely to be those in wealthy areas who are bored. It equally finds that those who troll, or indeed troll-call, are likely to show the symptoms of antisocial personality disorder and histrionic personality disorder respectively. With the media focussing on represent young people as trolls, the research finds that the existence of benevolent sexism in the police perpetuates this myth, meaning women are getting more favourably treatment, either as trolls or troll-callers. In fact the research finds trolls are as likely to be men or women, and they will change the way they troll based on their target, meaning feminists deemed misandrist will face sexist posts including from women, but the same trolls, regardless of their sex, would have used racist remarks if the feminists calling for more rights for women were Black and calling for more rights for Black people. The research concludes that deterring trolling requires a community-led approach, where local government can use their law enforcement powers, such as to issue fixed penalty notices or anti-social behaviour orders, against those trolls they can prove took part in trolling by using their surveillance rights.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). The Misrepresentation of Digital Teens as Trolls: Considering Political, News and Feminist Agendas. Invited Speech to the 13th International Conference on E-Society (E-Society 2015), Madeira, Portugal, 14-16 March 2015.

Digital Teens and the ‘Antisocial Network’: Prevalence of Troublesome Online Youth Groups and Internet trolling in Great Britain

Digital Teens and the ‘Antisocial Network’: Prevalence of Troublesome Online Youth Groups and Internet trolling in Great Britain

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

A concern shared among nearly all generations of adults is that they must do something to tackle the problems in society caused by young people. They often forget that they were once young, and all too often blame young people for all of problems in their community. This paper challenges this view and shows how the blaming of Internet trolling on today’s young people – called digital teens – is probably inaccurate. What might otherwise be called Troublesome Online Youth Groups (TOYGs), this paper looks at data collected from subjects in three UK regions (n=150 to 161), which includes young people who are not in education, employment or training (NEETs). Unlike might be typically thought, the data shows that far from these NEETs being the causes of Internet trolling it is in fact the areas with high levels of productivity, higher education and higher intelligence that report lower perceptions of quality of life that these electronic message faults (EMFts) most occur in.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Digital Teens and the ‘Antisocial Network’: Prevalence of Troublesome Online Youth Groups and Internet trolling in Great Britain. International Journal of E-Politics 5(3), pp.1-15. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/digital-teens-and-the-antisocial-network.pdf

We Don’t Do Politics: An Analysis and Discussion of Information Seeking Behaviour Research in Relation to the Net Generation

We Don’t Do Politics: An Analysis and Discussion of Information Seeking Behaviour Research in Relation to the Net Generation

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Information Seeking Behaviour (ISB) is becoming an interesting topic, especially with the advancement of the World Wide Web and technologically enhanced data collection techniques. Differences between generations, such as the Net Generation and Baby Boomers are becoming more and more evident. The Net Generation have shown they are enjoying more public policy participation than ever before through the use of the Internet. Finding an overall methodology that takes into account this generation is therefore a challenge. This chapter applies a heuristic framework to a number of research papers on the Net Generation and ISBs in order to critically analyse and evaluate the information within it in order to gain an insight into the most effective approach to ISB research. Through interpreting these research papers, this chapter attempts to gauge the scope and develop an understanding of ISB research in relation to the Net Generation and discover the most effective methodological approach for the emerging discipline.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2014). We Don’t Do Politics: An Analysis and Discussion of Information Seeking Behaviour Research in Relation to the Net Generation. In J. Bishop (Ed.), Transforming Politics and Policy in the Digital Age (pp. 6-21). IGI Global, Hershey, PA.

The equatrics of intergenerational knowledge transformation in techno-cultures

The equatrics of intergenerational knowledge transformation in techno-cultures

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to discuss the different generations of people that exists today, the aspects of their characters that the)’ have in common, and the ways in which information systems, such as virtual worlds, can be adapted so that the inevitable conflicts between them are better managed and knowledge transformation among them is more effectively achieved.

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Reference

Bishop, J. (2011). The equatrics of intergenerational knowledge transformation in techno-cultures. Thesis in part fulfillment of the MScEcon in information systems at Aberystwyth University.

The potential of persuasive technology for educating heterogeneous user groups

The potential of persuasive technology for educating heterogeneous user groups

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The Masters-level thesis presents an overview of the state of play in minority language education in Europe in 2004, and discusses ways in which e-learning systems can be adapted to take account of then emerging generations like the Net Generation, using buddy-lists and extendible and re-usable learning objects, 3 years before Facebook was launched, replacing learning objects with plug-ins.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2004). The potential of persuasive technology for educating heterogeneous user groups. Submission in Part fulfilment of the MSc in E-Learning. Pontypridd, GB: University of Glamorgan. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-potential-of-persuasive-technology-in-educating-heterogeneous-user-groups-jonathanbishop.pdf