Tag Archives: Cyberbullying

Examining the Concepts, Issues, and Implications of Internet Trolling

Examining the Concepts, Issues, and Implications of Internet Trolling

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Examining the Concepts, Issues, and Implications of Internet Trolling provides current research on the technical approaches as well as more social and behavioural involvements for gaining a better understanding of internet trolling. This book is useful to researchers, students and practitioners interested in building a share meaning for online community users. 

Publisher’s Summary

Examining the Concepts, Issues and Implications of Internet Trolling

Discussion

Contributors from a range of fields that includes civil engineering and philosophy, but is rather denser around computer science and education, explore Internet trolling, defined as any form of abuse carried out online for the pleasure of the people causing the abuse or the audience to which they are trying to appeal. They cover social, legal and ethical issues; psychological and wellbeing issues; trust and participation issues in Web 2.0 systems at risk of Internet trolling; and possible solutions for dealing with Internet trolling. Among specific topics are codes of ethics in discussion forums, politeness as a social computing requirement, a survey of trust use and modeling in real online systems, a proposed framework for sustainable communities for knowledge management systems, and a multi-agents system applied on a cyberbullying model for a social network.” – Annotation ©2013 Book News Inc. Portland, OR.

References

Bishop, J. (2013). Examining the Concepts, Issues, and Implications of Internet Trolling. Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Scope and Limitations in the Government of Wales Act 2006 for Tackling Internet Abuses in the Form of ‘Flame Trolling’

Scope and Limitations in the Government of Wales Act 2006 for Tackling Internet Abuses in the Form of ‘Flame Trolling’

Jonathan Bishop

Introduction

Devolution has had a significant impact on the differences between the way legislation is constructed and implemented in the nations and regions of the British Isles that form part of the United Kingdom. It is known that the ever-increasing divergence of such legislation is leading to new legislative regimes that will mean that policies on talking ‘mis-behaviour’ will differ significantly over time.1 A search of the news archives of one of these nations in particular, Wales, including The Western Mail, South Wales Echo, South Wales Evening Post, found over 700 articles that could be linked to internet abuse. Of these articles, there were 36 instances of the Welsh Assembly being mentioned and none of these related to tackling Internet abuse. One of the few references to information technology specifically was when the then education Minister, Jane Davidson, was reported as saying that Welsh Government (WG)’s decision to spend £24m on IT equipment for schools over three years would ensure all pupils had a chance to develop skills needed. This clearly shows the lack of priority of tackling Internet abuse as distinct from other forms of offline bullying. In fact, it is known that its drive to ensure schools have effective anti-bullying policies affects the extent to which traditional forms of bullying occur at those schools in Wales.2 Indeed, it is argued that whilst clear evidence shows that school non-attendance is liked to cyberbullying, this is an ever-increasing problem that policymakers have not kept up with the ‘hardly standing still’ topic.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Scope and Limitations in the Government of Wales Act 2006 for Tackling Internet Abuses in the Form of ‘Flame Trolling’. Statute Law Review 33 (2), 207-216. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/scope-and-limitations-of-the-government-of-wales-act-2006-for-tackling-internet-abuses-in-the-form-of-flame-trolling.pdf