Tag Archives: CCTV

Improving Homeland Security through Dualist Identity Card Schemes and Mass Surveillance: Interviews with a Victim of Public Sector Brutality and a Licensed Alcohol Seller

Improving Homeland Security through Dualist Identity Card Schemes and Mass Surveillance: Interviews with a Victim of Public Sector Brutality and a Licensed Alcohol Seller

Jonathan Bishop

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2017). Improving Homeland Security through Dualist Identity Card Schemes and Mass Surveillance: Interviews with a Victim of Public Sector Brutality and a Licensed Alcohol Seller. In: Homeland Security: Perceptions, Threats and Challenges for the Next Administration. Nova Science Publishers: New York, NY.

The role of affective computing for ensuring safety in at-risk educational environments: The development of ‘VoisJet’ and ‘VoisEye’ for forensic phonetical analysis

The role of affective computing for ensuring safety in at-risk educational environments: The development of ‘VoisJet’ and ‘VoisEye’ for forensic phonetical analysis

Jonathan Bishop and Darren Bellenger

Abtract

This paper presents an introduction to the use of affective computing in at-risk educational environments, such as those that schools located in areas where there is armed conflict and for the safeguarding of children and at-risk adults more generally. This paper has discussed the improvement of the EigenFace based facial emotion recognition by continually streamlining the facial dataset used and its application in at-risk educational environments. One of these mimics the authors’ EigenFaces library and appears to have better performance in poor lighting and poor camera situations, making it possibly better for drone use. It is therefore paramount that as the authors develop the system further that they keep each component separate, in case it is decided to utilise commercial libraries (e.g. Microsoft Project Oxford) for certain aspects. A structure such as VoisOver that allows for third party technologies to be plugged in would mean the authors’ code can remain separate from that of third party plug-ins, namely specific algorithms for identifying the core 12 emotion sets the authors have devised in contexts that might not even have been considered yet. Such algorithms could work with the system described in this paper to make its operation in at-risk educational environments even more possible.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop and Darren Bellenger (2016). The role of affective computing for ensuring safety in at-risk educational environments: The development of ‘VoisJet’ and ‘VoisEye’ for forensic phonetical analysis. The 2016 International Conference on Computational Science and Computational Intelligence (CSCI’2016). 15-17 December 2016, Las Vegas, NV. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/affective-computing-for-ensuring-safety-in-at-risk-educational-environments.pdf

Transforming the UK Home Office into a Department for Homeland Security: Reflecting on an Interview with a Litigant Defending Against Online Retaliatory Feedback in the US

Transforming the UK Home Office into a Department for Homeland Security: Reflecting on an Interview with a Litigant Defending Against Online Retaliatory Feedback in the US

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Retaliatory feedback is a significant problem on the Internet, which is not just confined to online auction websites, but other online environments dependent on reputation systems. Explored in this paper are the acts of an Internet troller who spread malicious and false allegations that the series of conferences called WORLDCOMP are “fake.” This paper interviews one of the organisers of this conference to ask how they went about dealing with the retaliatory feedback, and in particular their engagement with law enforcement agencies, such as from the FBI to the US Department of Homeland Security. To reform the UK Home Office to learn lessons from this, the paper proposes making greater use of National Crime Agency and Police and Crime Commissioners to provide a better strategic set-up for law enforcement under the UK Home Office. It also suggest using publicly funded solicitors and community wardens, as opposed to the current set-up of police constables, to deal with community policing.

References

  • Jonathan Bishop (2017). Transforming the UK Home Office into a Department for Homeland Security: Reflecting on an Interview with a Litigant Defending Against Online Retaliatory Feedback in the US. International Journal of Public Administration in the Digital Age.
  • Jonathan Bishop (2014). Transforming the UK Home Office into a Department for Homeland Security: Reflecting on an Interview with a Litigant Defending Against Online Retaliatory Feedback in the US. Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management 11(4), 511-531.
  • Jonathan Bishop (2016). Retraction of: Transforming the UK Home Office into a Department for Homeland Security: Reflecting on an Interview with a Litigant Defending Against Online Retaliatory Feedback in the US. Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management 13(1), 1-21.

Internet Trolling and the 2011 UK Riots: The Need for a Dualist Reform of the Constitutional, Administrative and Security Frameworks in Great Britain

Internet Trolling and the 2011 UK Riots: The Need for a Dualist Reform of the Constitutional, Administrative and Security Frameworks in Great Britain

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This article proposes the need for ‘dualism’ in the legal system, where civil and criminal offences are considered at the same time, and where both the person complaining and the person responding are on trial at the same time. Considered is how reforming the police and judiciary, such as by replacing the police with legal aid solicitors and giving many of their other powers to the National Crime Agency could improve outcomes for all. The perils of the current system, which treats the accused as criminals until proven not guilty, are critiqued, and suggestions for replacing this process with courts of law that treat complainant and respondent equally are made. The article discusses how such a system based on dualism might have operated during the August 2011 UK riots, where the situation had such a dramatic effect on how the social networking aspects, such as ‘Internet trolling’, affected it.

Full text

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Internet Trolling and the 2011 UK Riots: The Need for a Dualist Reform of the Constitutional, Administrative and Security Frameworks in Great Britain. European Journal of Law Reform 16(1), pp. 154-167. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/internet-trolling-and-the-2011-uk-riots.pdf

Reducing Corruption and Protecting Privacy in Emerging Economies: The Potential of Neuroeconomic Gamification and Western Media Regulation in Trust Building and Economic Growth

Reducing Corruption and Protecting Privacy in Emerging Economies: The Potential of Neuroeconomic Gamification and Western Media Regulation in Trust Building and Economic Growth

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter presents a location-based affective computing system, which can assist growing emerging markets by helping them reduce crime and increase public safety when used in conjunction with CCTV. Internet systems based on location-based services have increased in availability. Social platforms such as Twitter and Facebook now employ the information on user locations to provide context to their posts, and services such as Foursquare rely on people checking into different places, often to compete with their friends and others. Location-based information, when combined with other records, such as CCTV, promotes the opportunity for a better society. People normally abused by corrupt state officials for crimes they did not commit will now have alibis, shops will be able to more effectively build trust and procure new customers through “social proof,” and other forms of corruption will be tackled such as benefit fraud and tax evasion. Trust that everyone is paying his or her fair share can develop.

Full Text

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2013). Reducing Corruption and Protecting Privacy in Emerging Economies: The Potential of Neuroeconomic Gamification and Western Media Regulation in Trust Building and Economic Growth. In: Bryan Christiansenand Muslum Basilgan (Eds.) Economic Behavior, Game Theory, and Technology in Emerging Markets. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. (Pages 237-249). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/reducing-corruption-and-protecting-privact-in-emerging-economies-the-potential-of-neuroeonomic-gamification-and-western-media-regulation-in-trust-building-and-economic-growth.pdf