Tag Archives: Women’s Studies Research

The Thin-Blue Web: Police Crime Records of Internet Trolling Show Chivalrous Attitudes That Can Be Resolved through Transfer of Powers

The Thin-Blue Web: Police Crime Records of Internet Trolling Show Chivalrous Attitudes That Can Be Resolved through Transfer of Powers

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter using an empirical data-driven approach to investigate crime recording logs of South Wales Police relating to Internet trolling by and towards different sexes. The chapter finds more favourable attitudes towards women as victims in even the most trivial of cases. It finds male victims of trolling are only treated as victims when a form of unwanted face-to-face encounter is needed for action. The chapter shows transferring police powers to local authorities, can cut the cost of community policing by 50% across the board and eliminate sexist attitudes also. The chapter finds that the way social media platforms are exercising ‘sysop prerogative’ where they have no right to – such as not passing over account information on alleged defamers – puts a huge burden on police resources. Using local authorities, which have many of the same powers as the police and indeed more, can resolve problems without the need to criminalise offenders.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2015). The Thin-Blue Web: Police Crime Records of Internet Trolling Show Chivalrous Attitudes That Can Be Resolved through Transfer of Powers. In P. Thomas, M. Srihari, & S. Kaur (Eds.) Handbook of Research on Cultural and Economic Impacts of the Information Society (pp. 67-91), IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-thin-blue-web-police-crime-records-of-internet-trolling-show-chivalrous-attitudes-that-can-be-resolved-through-transfer-of-powers.pdf

Review: Do It Like a Woman by Caroline Criado-Perez

Review: Do It Like a Woman by Caroline Criado-Perez

Jeremy McDonagh

Abstract

Do It Like A Woman (and change the world) is part of a contemporary wave of populist feminist writing which also includes How To Be a Woman (Caitlin Moran, 2012), Bad Feminist (Roxane Gay, 2014), Men Explain Things to Me (Rebecca Solnit, 2014), Not That Kind of Girl (Lena Dunham, 2014), and We Should All Be Feminists (Chimamanda Ngozi, 2014). Where Criado-Perez differs from her peers is in choosing not to write from a first-person perspective, despite the personal experiences that inspired the book, and instead bringing together a collection of stories from over 25 different sources to carry her theme.

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Citation

Jeremy McDonagh (2015). Review: Do It Like a Woman by Caroline Criado-Perez. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 2(1), pp.39-46. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/do-it-like-a-woman-by-caroline-criado-perez.pdf

Editorial for the Special Issue on Sex and Equality

Editorial for the Special Issue on Sex and Equality

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This special issue on Sex and Equality brings together a number of papers looking at how sex and gender interact with equality in the digital age.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Editorial for the Special Issue on Sex and Equality. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 2(1), 1-4. Available at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/editorial-for-the-special-issue-on-sex-and-equality.pdf

Private Bodies, Public Pleasures: Asserting Male Dominance through Internet Creepshots

Private Bodies, Public Pleasures: Asserting Male Dominance through Internet Creepshots

Kristen Colbeck

Abstract

This paper explores the recent online photographic phenomenon of creepshots, examining the implications of this trend psychoanalytically. Creepshots are non-consensual photographs taken of women in public spaces, shared online via forums for the express purposes of sexual gratification. The objective of this paper is two-fold. First, the author outlines the parameters for understanding the significance of these photographs as a categorically fetishistic perversion (fetishistic scopophilia), as they serve a predominately visual pleasure function. However, the author also argues that this fetishism works in conjunction with voyeuristic scopophilia, arguing against Mulvey’s (2009b) contention that the male audience will choose one or the other for dealing with female visual objects. By subjecting women to voyeuristic and fetishistic scopophilia, it is argued that creepshot producers and consumers subconsciously and anonymously work to symbolically remove power from their female subjects, reducing them to passive sexual objects for widespread male domination and consumption.

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Citation

Kristen Colbeck (2015). Private Bodies, Public Pleasures: Asserting Male Dominance through Internet Creepshots. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 2(1), 5-25. Available at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/private-bodies-public-pleasures-asserting-male-dominance-through-internet-creepshots.pdf

The persuasive properties of representing gender and blame in online news reporting of Internet trolling: A case study of Liam Stacey, Fabrice Muamba, Peter Nunn and Stella Creasy

The persuasive properties of representing gender and blame in online news reporting of Internet trolling: A case study of Liam Stacey, Fabrice Muamba, Peter Nunn and Stella Creasy

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This paper presents a study into two news articles on Internet trolling – one sourced from already communicated media and one generated by the author. The articles were evaluated by interviewing someone who regularly reads online news content. It was found that intended messages in news articles can often be picked up by those reading it, but it does not automatically mean those messages will be accepted by them.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). The persuasive properties of representing gender and blame in online news reporting of Internet trolling: A case study of Liam Stacey, Fabrice Muamba, Peter Nunn and Stella Creasy. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 2(1), 27-37. Available online: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-persuasive-properties-of-representing-gender-and-blame-in-online-news-reporting-of-internet-trolling.pdf

‘U r Bias Love:’ Using ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ as forensic linguistic means to annotate Twitter and newsblog comments for the purpose of multimedia forensics

‘U r Bias Love:’ Using ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ as forensic linguistic means to annotate Twitter and newsblog comments for the purpose of multimedia forensics

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The mass adoption of social media has brought with it the most undesirable aspects of human nature, namely the need to abuse one’s fellow kind for sometimes difficult to understand reasons. There has been severe pressure on law enforcement agencies to respond to this Internet abuse, commonly called Internet trolling. Equally, there has been demands made of social media companies to better police the content on their platforms. There is also the option of civil action for those who have been targeted by the ‘trolls’ who post the abusive comments. This paper suggests understanding UK case law in relation to Internet trolling and cyber-harassment should be done through the prism of the French legal concepts of bleasure (i.e. blessure) and motif. The paper provides a framework for those involved in multimedia forensics to abstract information from identified abusive content (i.e. motifs) to determine whether it would be reasonable to say that such messages harmed a person (i.e. caused a bleasure). Using a corpus linguistics approach, the paper identifies abusive posts made against prominent women public figures on Twitter and newsblogs in the last three years, namely Sally Bercow, Caroline Criado-Perez, Esther McVay and Salma Yaqoob. The paper finds that it is possible to systematically abstract data from social media platforms that both show that an offence has happened (i.e. actus reus, motif), that a person has been harmed (i.e. malum reus, bleasure), and whether it has occurred, or is likely to occur, over a longer period of time (i.e. pertinax reus). This can be done using ‘interface cues’ in the form of authority cues and bandwagon cues, which need to rely on an effective corpus of key terms to be useful.

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). ‘U r Bias Love:’ using ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ as forensic linguistic means to annotate Twitter and newsblog comments for the purpose of multimedia forensics. The 11th International Conference on Web Based Communities and Social Media 2014, Lisbon, Portugal, 17–19 July 2014. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/ur-bias-love-using-bleasure-and-motif-as-forensic-linguistic-means-to-annotate-twitter-and-newsblog-comments-for-the-purpose-of-multimedia-forensics.pdf

Using the concepts of ‘forensic linguistics,’ ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ to enhance multimedia forensic evidence collection

Using the concepts of ‘forensic linguistics,’ ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ to enhance multimedia forensic evidence collection

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Internet trolling has become more widely adopted as a term to describe a range of data misuse and Internet abuse offences. To date there has been no coherent means to interpret online postings for the purpose of forensic collating and reporting of evidence. This paper proposes to use the terms of bleasure and motif, used in French law, in order to classify Internet trolling postings according to the extent their have harmed people (i.e. malum reus) and the extent to which it can be proved such bleasures show actus reus through treating them as motifs as one would in French law. Through investigating the posting of sex-related trolling messages sent to and relating to women on YouTube the study proposes a framework for classifying these messages. These chauvinistic messages are often related to rape, so the paper aims to help crime investigators use multimedia forensics to more easy collect and use evidence in cases of Internet trolling.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Using the concepts of ‘forensic linguistics,’ ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ to enhance multimedia forensic evidence collection. The 2014 International Conference on Security and Management (SAM’14), Monte Carlo Resort , in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. 21-24 July 2014. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/using-the-concepts-of-forensic-linguistics-bleasure-and-motif-to-enhance-multimedia-forensic-evidence-collection.pdf

The pit head baths are now an Internet café: The role of technology in transforming audience, institutions and power structures among women in Wales

The pit head baths are now an Internet café: The role of technology in transforming audience, institutions and power structures among women in Wales

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The coal-fields communities in Wales were once one of the most relatively prosperous places to live in the British Isles. Many people flocked to Wales in search of a new life and opportunities for their family. Coal became known as ‘Black Gold’ and the industrialized coal-fields became centres of productivity. Media use in Welsh households has generally been controlled by dominating men who saw and in many cases still see themselves as the ‘heads of the household.’ Such control over the media consumption of women was not out of place in the UK as a whole, where men have assumed a place as a de facto media institution who force choices of what to watch on their households. This paper presents a longitudinal study of three women in Wales conducted between 2000 and 2013 that shows how the media consumption and audience styles have changed over time so that power structures from both men and traditional media institutions has all but eroded.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2014). The pit head baths are now an Internet café: The role of technology in transforming audience, institutions and power structures among women in Wales. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Transforming Politics and Policy in the Digital Age. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-pit-head-baths-are-now-an-internet-cafe-women-in-wales.pdf

YouTube if you want to – The lady’s not for blogging: Using ‘bleasures’ and ‘motifs’ to support multimedia forensic analyses of harassment by social media

YouTube if you want to – The lady’s not for blogging: Using ‘bleasures’ and ‘motifs’ to support multimedia forensic analyses of harassment by social media

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The year 2013 will be known in the Internet trolling community as the one where the dark sides of the phenomena were most present. Public figures like Caroline Criado-Perez were targeted with some of the most abusive comments, including threats of rape, many which might have seemed credible at the time. This presentation looks through some of the posts on Twitter and YouTube to find out why such verminous attacks were made. Though using the French legal concepts of Bleasure and Motif as part of a multimedia forensics approach the talk concludes that the most passionate and vile forms of Internet trolling arise out of a contempt trolls have for bias and hypocrisy. Caroline Criado-Perez was abused because she was a woman calling for more women on banknotes and therefore less men. Had she been a Black person calling for more Black people on banknotes she would have received racist comments and not sexist ones – probably from the same people. By looking at other women, namely Salma Yaqoob, Sally Bercow and Esther McVey, the talk concludes that the best way to not be trolled is to advocate rights for a group one does not belong to. It equally concludes that the concepts of Bleasure and Motif can be helping in providing evidence of trolling and the effect it has on others.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2014). YouTube if you want to – The lady’s not for blogging: Using ‘bleasures’ and ‘motifs’ to support multimedia forensic analyses of harassment by social media. Presentation to the Oxford Cyber Harassment Symposium. 27-28 March 2014. St Edmund’s Hall, Oxford University. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/youtube-if-you-want-to-the-ladys-not-for-blogging.pdf

The empathic psychopathy in public life: Towards an understanding of ‘autism’ and ’empathism’; as ‘dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity’

The empathic psychopathy in public life: Towards an understanding of ‘autism’ and ’empathism’ and ‘dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity’

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

So-called ‘autism’ is a generally well understood condition yet it is claimed has no known cure, is best dealt with through “early intervention,” and to many is deserving of pity. This poster shows an aetiology of ‘autism’ and what can be called ’empathism’ as being caused by ‘dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity’ that results in ‘autistic’ functions of the brain and ‘empathic’ ones being used unequally, with one being more predominant than the other. The poster argues that those who overuse the ‘empathic’ parts of the brain suffer from ‘empathism’ which impairs their relationship skills as much as social skills are impaired in people with ‘autism,’ who overuse the ‘autistic’ parts of their brain. The poster concludes by discussing how the researcher’s advancements in affective computing could be used to assist people with the symptoms of obsessive compulsive and narcissistic disorders that result from the mental dependence to an imbalance in serotonin and dopamine activity in the brain. The poster displays two diagrams linking these together, including the relationship between autism and empathism with regards to other so-called personality disorders.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2013). ‘The empathic psychopathy in public life: Towards an understanding of ‘autism’ and ’empathism’ and ‘dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity.‘ Poster presented to the Implications of Research on the Neuroscience of Affect, Attachment, and Social Cognition Conference. 18th May 2013 – 19th May 2013. University College London, London, GB. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-empathic-psychopathy-in-public-life.pdf