Tag Archives: Trauma & Injury Research

Trolling Is Not Just a Art. It Is an Science: The Role of Automated Affective Content Screening in Regulating Digital Media and Reducing Risk of Trauma

Trolling Is Not Just a Art. It Is an Science: The Role of Automated Affective Content Screening in Regulating Digital Media and Reducing Risk of Trauma

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter seeks to explore the role media content ratings play in the age of “Internet trolling” and other electronic media issues like “sexting.” Using ANOVA to validate a four-factor approach to media ratings based on maturity, the chapter finds the ability of a person to withstand various media content, measured in “knol,” which is the brain’s capacity to process information, can be used to calculate media ratings. The study concludes it is feasible to have brain-computer interfaces for PCs and kiosks to test the maturity of vulnerable persons and recommend to parents/guardians or cinema managers whether or not to allow someone access to the content they wish to consume. This could mean that computer software could be programmed to automatically censor content that person is likely to be distressed or grossly offended by. Public policy issues relating to these supply-side interventions are discussed.

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Trolling Is Not Just a Art. It Is an Science: The Role of Automated Affective Content Screening in Regulating Digital Media and Reducing Risk of Trauma. In: Maria Manuela Cruz-Cunha & Irene Maria Portela (Eds.). Handbook of Research on
Digital Crime, Cyberspace Security, and Information Assurance. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/trolling-is-not-just-a-art-it-is-an-science.pdf

‘U r Bias Love:’ Using ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ as forensic linguistic means to annotate Twitter and newsblog comments for the purpose of multimedia forensics

‘U r Bias Love:’ Using ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ as forensic linguistic means to annotate Twitter and newsblog comments for the purpose of multimedia forensics

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The mass adoption of social media has brought with it the most undesirable aspects of human nature, namely the need to abuse one’s fellow kind for sometimes difficult to understand reasons. There has been severe pressure on law enforcement agencies to respond to this Internet abuse, commonly called Internet trolling. Equally, there has been demands made of social media companies to better police the content on their platforms. There is also the option of civil action for those who have been targeted by the ‘trolls’ who post the abusive comments. This paper suggests understanding UK case law in relation to Internet trolling and cyber-harassment should be done through the prism of the French legal concepts of bleasure (i.e. blessure) and motif. The paper provides a framework for those involved in multimedia forensics to abstract information from identified abusive content (i.e. motifs) to determine whether it would be reasonable to say that such messages harmed a person (i.e. caused a bleasure). Using a corpus linguistics approach, the paper identifies abusive posts made against prominent women public figures on Twitter and newsblogs in the last three years, namely Sally Bercow, Caroline Criado-Perez, Esther McVay and Salma Yaqoob. The paper finds that it is possible to systematically abstract data from social media platforms that both show that an offence has happened (i.e. actus reus, motif), that a person has been harmed (i.e. malum reus, bleasure), and whether it has occurred, or is likely to occur, over a longer period of time (i.e. pertinax reus). This can be done using ‘interface cues’ in the form of authority cues and bandwagon cues, which need to rely on an effective corpus of key terms to be useful.

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). ‘U r Bias Love:’ using ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ as forensic linguistic means to annotate Twitter and newsblog comments for the purpose of multimedia forensics. The 11th International Conference on Web Based Communities and Social Media 2014, Lisbon, Portugal, 17–19 July 2014. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/ur-bias-love-using-bleasure-and-motif-as-forensic-linguistic-means-to-annotate-twitter-and-newsblog-comments-for-the-purpose-of-multimedia-forensics.pdf

Using the concepts of ‘forensic linguistics,’ ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ to enhance multimedia forensic evidence collection

Using the concepts of ‘forensic linguistics,’ ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ to enhance multimedia forensic evidence collection

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Internet trolling has become more widely adopted as a term to describe a range of data misuse and Internet abuse offences. To date there has been no coherent means to interpret online postings for the purpose of forensic collating and reporting of evidence. This paper proposes to use the terms of bleasure and motif, used in French law, in order to classify Internet trolling postings according to the extent their have harmed people (i.e. malum reus) and the extent to which it can be proved such bleasures show actus reus through treating them as motifs as one would in French law. Through investigating the posting of sex-related trolling messages sent to and relating to women on YouTube the study proposes a framework for classifying these messages. These chauvinistic messages are often related to rape, so the paper aims to help crime investigators use multimedia forensics to more easy collect and use evidence in cases of Internet trolling.

Full Text

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Using the concepts of ‘forensic linguistics,’ ‘bleasure’ and ‘motif’ to enhance multimedia forensic evidence collection. The 2014 International Conference on Security and Management (SAM’14), Monte Carlo Resort , in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. 21-24 July 2014. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/using-the-concepts-of-forensic-linguistics-bleasure-and-motif-to-enhance-multimedia-forensic-evidence-collection.pdf

YouTube if you want to – The lady’s not for blogging: Using ‘bleasures’ and ‘motifs’ to support multimedia forensic analyses of harassment by social media

YouTube if you want to – The lady’s not for blogging: Using ‘bleasures’ and ‘motifs’ to support multimedia forensic analyses of harassment by social media

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The year 2013 will be known in the Internet trolling community as the one where the dark sides of the phenomena were most present. Public figures like Caroline Criado-Perez were targeted with some of the most abusive comments, including threats of rape, many which might have seemed credible at the time. This presentation looks through some of the posts on Twitter and YouTube to find out why such verminous attacks were made. Though using the French legal concepts of Bleasure and Motif as part of a multimedia forensics approach the talk concludes that the most passionate and vile forms of Internet trolling arise out of a contempt trolls have for bias and hypocrisy. Caroline Criado-Perez was abused because she was a woman calling for more women on banknotes and therefore less men. Had she been a Black person calling for more Black people on banknotes she would have received racist comments and not sexist ones – probably from the same people. By looking at other women, namely Salma Yaqoob, Sally Bercow and Esther McVey, the talk concludes that the best way to not be trolled is to advocate rights for a group one does not belong to. It equally concludes that the concepts of Bleasure and Motif can be helping in providing evidence of trolling and the effect it has on others.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2014). YouTube if you want to – The lady’s not for blogging: Using ‘bleasures’ and ‘motifs’ to support multimedia forensic analyses of harassment by social media. Presentation to the Oxford Cyber Harassment Symposium. 27-28 March 2014. St Edmund’s Hall, Oxford University. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/youtube-if-you-want-to-the-ladys-not-for-blogging.pdf

Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization  for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online

Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization  for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Chatroom Bobs, which derived from the concept of ‘Uncle Bob’ being a name for a less than responsible family man, are characterised by being online community users driven by seeking out satisfaction for their ‘urgeances’ (or biological drives). Some of these are akin to the ‘office loser’ who tries to impress others but is despised, others have more ulterior motives for sexual satisfaction. This paper presents an intervention – called MEDIAT – which uses TAGTeach to retrain people who are sexually damaged by society and demonstrate impairment in how they interact with others. The paper presents an equation for measuring such ‘social orientation impairment’ as a reflection of its relationship to serotonergic and dopaminergic activity in the prefrontal cortex as a result of differences in ‘Neuro-response plasticity’. The paper concludes that by using MEDIAT to reverse dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity caused by traumatic experience can lead to increased constructive participation in online and other environments.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online. In: 13th International Conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BIOCOMP’12), 16-19 July 2012, USA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/taming-the-chatroom-bob-the-role-of-brain-computer-interfaces-that-manipulate-prefrontal-cortex-optimization-for-increasing-participation-of-victims-of-traumatic-sex-and-other-abuse-online.pdf

Response to the Open Public Services White Paper

The UK Government has Published its White Paper on Open Public Services. Their priorities are:

  • Choice – wherever possible we will increase choice
  • Decentralisation – Power should be decentralised to the lowest appropriate level
  • Diversity – Public services should be open to a range of providers
    Fairness – We will ensure fair access to public services
  • Accountability – Public services should be accountable to users and taxpayers.

Crocels has responded to it in depth as you can see at the bottom of this post. We suggest that the following questions need to be answered in response to it. Comments are welcomed from visitors to this site by using the form below.

Enabling the Big Society

1. The White Paper asks about empowering public sector staff to take control of their own services in new enterprises like mutuals. Equally, how can the skills of members of the public be raised so that they may be emancipated from the controlling state, where they may have a voice at the ballot box, but have little choice in the decisions made for them?

2. The White Paper envisages actively encouraging new providers, of all sizes and from all sectors, to deliver public services. How can those elected representatives who believe in the means of production, distribution and exchange being in the hands of the State and imposed by democratically elected governments, be transitioned to a people-led society where government plays a smaller role than at present?

Changing Models of Enforcement

3. The White Paper says the Government wants to involve independent champions like Which in open public services. Crocels agrees with this in principle and ask: Would a body like this make a better job of enforcing trading standards than local authorities?

Education

4. The White Paper speaks about school and university admissions. Would it be fairer if the top 5% of students at every school, regardless of the marks of the candidate get given an A* grade? This could mean those from disadvantaged areas could meet admission criteria for elite universities even though there is still work to do in improving local provision.

5. The White Paper speaks about the English Baccalaureate. Would it not be better to have a system similar to Bologna to harmonise qualifications across the EU while using Europass Mobility to explain local curricula?

6. The White Paper speaks about the Pupil Premium and school funding. Could the Pupil Premium be used to allow greater choice and mobility of pupils beyond catchment areas, such as on the basis of the successful Assisted Places Scheme?

7. The White Paper speaks about improving school funding arrangements. As in the previous paragraph, could this be done of the basis of choice so the funding goes directly to schools picked by the students parents and by-passing the local authorities?

Healthcare and Disability

8. The White paper talks about various health funding schemes such as for sufferers of chronic health conditions, adult social care, and support for special educational needs (SEN) and disability. Would it not be best if these various pots of money were given to the persons preferred P4+choice service provider, for example Bupa/AXA/etc. in the case of healthcare, or charities like the NAS for people with autism or RNIB for people who are blind, who are currently financed from Direct Payments?

Economic Models

9. What changes need to be made to economic models based on financial capital so that they take account of the “mass-collaboration” drive of the Big Society, where volunteers and involunteers’ give or are made to give their time often only being exposed to opportunity cost.

10. Could the ‘P4+contingent’ model be the mandatory option for those out of work? Could this mean they will always be available for work should they be needed to cover for people who have withheld their labour?

Law Enforcement

11. Would a P4+gov body as the enforcer against everyday trespasses, like drunk and disorderly behaviour and other anti-social offences using P4+self ‘contingent workers’ be more cost effective than the current employee-based policing structure?

12. Will this proposed localised non-criminal resolution of trespasses, where something is a crime if the person feels ‘bleasured’ and this is found to be proven through ‘actus reus’ and ‘malum reus’ more quickly resolve ‘crime’ than the current system?

13. Would a protracted dualist judicial process discourage vexatious claims and reduce the likelihood of ‘ambulance chasers’ trying to make a quick profit?

14. Would removing police from day-to-day trespasses, where they stand likely to lose their jobs is crime is reduced, and replacing them with charities who have an interest in the victim, and insurance companies worried about their bottom line be more likely to lead to the resolution of ‘crimes’?

Cross-border use of welfare and tax and law enforcement

15. Does it make sense that National Insurance be used to fund health-care and social services support for UK Citizens wherever in the EU they are?

16. Would having a welfare system modelled on the ‘student loan’ system mean that other EU Nationals would have to pay back the ‘benefit payments’ they claimed in the UK when they go back home or anywhere else in the world?

17. Would having cross-border IT systems which flag-up registered offenders when they approach risk-areas, make it easier for EU Citizens to self-enforce the law through people-sector organisations like Neighbourhood Watch or other P4+gov initiatives?

18. Would EU-wide private-sector provided systems like Google Latitude make it easier for EU citizens to intercept property stolen from other EU citizens?

Detailed Response on Scribd

Crocels’s Reponse to Government White Paper on Open Public Services – Towards a P4 Mixed Economy//

Your Point of View

If you have answers to the questions above or any other views please make them in the reply form below

The role of the prefrontal cortex in social orientation construction: A pilot study

The role of the prefrontal cortex in social orientation construction: A pilot study

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The restoring and maximising of well-being in individuals disadvantaged or traumatised by physical, neurological, psychological or social causes therefore becomes a significant issue for all professionals whether in life, social or information sciences. This poster presents a review of the literature to establish a prima facie case for investigating the role of the prefrontal cortex in predetermining outcomes of the with medicalised social orientation impairments such as autism, Bipolar, Schizophrenia, ADHD, as well as problems relating to occupation health and substance misuse. The characteristics of the pre-frontal cortex are identified from a number of journals and then these terms cross references with those impairments. Anseries of equations are presented on how one might look at representing differences in the pre-frontal cortex by using a post-cognitivist psychology paradigm to represent the psycho-analytical concepts of ‘phantasies’ in a manner that allows for use in questionnaire, statistical analysis, and information system adaptation.

Summary of Conclusions

  • It is emotional dysfunction in the brain that causes most people to be autistic and not them having ‘autism’
  • Someone becomes autistic through a sub-optimal prefrontal cortex which affects working memory, among other factors.
  • A prefrontal cortex can become sub-optimal through lack of brain function to handle social and emotional stressors, such as might be caused by brain injuries such as hippocampal sclerosis
  • It can also become sub-optimal through traumatic abuse, including allergic reactions to vaccines, sex abuse, traumatic birth.
  • Finally, a sub-optimal pre-frontal cortex can come about through genetic mutations in it.
  • The degree of impairment in the prefrontal cortex can be measured through simple alpha and beta brain imaging tools

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2011). The role of the prefrontal cortex in social orientation construction: A pilot study. Poster presented to the British Psychological Society’s Sustainable Well-Being Conference. Glyndwr University, Wrexham, 10 September 2011. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-role-of-the-prefrontal-cortex-in-social-orientation-construction.pdf