Tag Archives: Social Media Lurking

Developing and Validating the “This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale”: Optimising Political Online Communities for Internet Trolling

Developing and Validating the “This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale”: Optimising Political Online Communities for Internet Trolling

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Internet trolling describes the posting of any content on the Internet which is provocative or offensive, which is different from the original meaning online in the 1990s, referring to the posting of messages for humourous effect. Those systems operators (sysops) who run online communities are being targeted because of abuse posted on their platforms. Political discussion groups are some of the most prone to trolling, whether consensual or unwanted. Many such websites ara open for anyone to join, meaning when some members post messages they know are offensive but legal, others might find grossly offensive, meaning these messages could be illegal. This paper develops a questionnaire called the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale (TIWWCHNT-20), which aims to help sysops better plan the development of online communities to take account of different users’ capacity to be offended, and for users to self-assess whether they will be suited to an online community. The scale is discussed in relation to different Internet posting techniques where different users will act differently.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2017). Developing and Validating the “This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale”: Optimising Political Online Communities for Internet Trolling. In Y. Ibrahim (Ed.), Politics, Protest, and Empowerment in Digital Spaces (pp. 153-177). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Available at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/developing-and-validating-tiwwchnt-20-scale.pdf

Special Issue: Call for Papers on Pseudonymity

Call for Papers: Special Issue on Pseudonymity

Submission Due Date

15 December 2016

Guest Editor

  • Jonathan Bishop
    • Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, Swansea, Wales.

Journal

The International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation

Introduction

Pseudonymity- a state of disguised identity. On one side of the debate are the world’s largest social network sites, including Facebook and Google+, with both services demanding that people use their real names and advocating the the push towards a “real name” Internet. On the other side of the debate are scholars such as sites such as 4chan and Reddit that view anonymity and pseudonymity as important to how people construct identity online. While much has been written about the benefits of anonymity and pseudonymity, there is a lack of published research examining specific practices enabled by pseudonyms.

Objective

The objective of the proposed Special Issue is to highlight the specific issues and challenges around pseudonymity. Research contributions in this special issue will provide insights about the nature of pseudonymity in relation to technology. The contents in this special issue are of interest for researchers working in the domains of Internet security, online communities, e-participation, cyberculture, e-politics, e-society, sociology, cybercultures and multimedia studies, and cognitive science.

Recommended Topics

The journal welcomes articles, dialogues, notes, book reviews and further comments thereon, in keeping with editorial policy, and areas of interest for this special issue include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Participation inequality; lurking, the free-rider problem
  • Free speech; cyberbantering, cybertrickery, online activism
  • Online harassment; cyberstalking, cyberbulling, porn e-vengers
  • Online deception; grooming, cyberhickery, chatroom bobs
  • Online Community moderation, perspectives on ‘don’t feed the troll’, blocking users (i.e. ban-hammering’)
  • History of new media, Anonymous, the WELL, hacktivism

Submission Procedure

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit papers for this special theme issue on Hypermedia Seduction and Persuasion. All submitted papers will be reviewed on a peer review basis. Papers must follow APA style for reference citations.

NB. Papers can be submitted any time before the deadline, as reviewing will take place throughout the period of the advertising of this call for papers. Successful papers for the special issue will be give a letter of approval so the authors can put their publication on their CVs.

Important Dates

  • Submission Deadline: 15 December 2016
  • Reviews to Authors by: 15 February 2017
  • Final Submissions: 15 March 2017
  • Publication: 30 April 2017

All submissions and inquiries should be directed to the attention of:

Jonathan Bishop FRSA
E-mail: jonathan.bishop@crocels.ac.uk
Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, European Parliament, Brussels, BE.

Using “On-the-Fly Corpus Linguistics” to Systematically Derive Word Definitions Using Inductive Abstraction and Reductionist Correlation Analysis: Considering Seductive and Gratifying Properties of Computer Jargon

Using “On-the-Fly Corpus Linguistics” to Systematically Derive Word Definitions Using Inductive Abstraction and Reductionist Correlation Analysis: Considering Seductive and Gratifying Properties of Computer Jargon

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Computer jargon is something that can either unite people, or draw them apart. This chapter looks at definitions of the terms, ‘trolling,’ ‘flame,’ ‘flame-war’ and ‘lurking,’ as presented in specialist dictionaries, newspapers and through a survey of laypersons. The aim of the chapter was to see whether it was possible to objectively define terms using a quantitative analysis of qualitative data. The study finds that objectively determining a definition of a term requires a bigger dataset than is used for qualitative studies. It further notes that whilst there is a lot in common with expert definitions, the problem with drawing definitions from others is that whilst it might produce objective definitions they might not be accurate ones.

Full Text

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2015). On-the-Fly Corpus Linguistics” to Systematically Derive Word Definitions Using Inductive Abstraction and Reductionist Correlation Analysis: Considering Seductive and Gratifying Properties of Computer Jargon. In: Jonathan Bishop (Ed.) Psychological and Social Implications Surrounding Internet and Gaming Addiction. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/using-on-the-fly-corpus-linguistics-to-systematically-derive-word-definitions-using-inductive-abstraction-and-reducationist-correlation-analysis.pdf

Call for Papers: International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation

The International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation is a scholarly peer reviewed journal available both online (free) and in a traditional print format (subscription).

We publish research of interest to academics and practitioners, including those in the areas of new media, social networking and social media, legal studies and law enforcement, and human computer interaction.

Scope of publication

Topics covered and welcome for submission include the following:

  • Participation inequality; lurking, the free-rider problem
  • Participation initiatives; Classroom 2.0, eParticipation
  • Free speech; cyberbantering, cybertrickery, online activism
  • Online harassment; cyberstalking, cyberbulling, porn e-vengers
  • Online deception; grooming, cyberhickery, chatroom bobs
  • Transgressive humour, ‘trolling for the lulz’, viral humour, R.I.P Trolling
  • Online Community moderation, perspectives on ‘don’t feed the troll’, blocking users (i.e. ban-hammering’)
  • Online learning issues; retention, motivation, education policy
  • New media policy in the UK, Wales and Europe
  • History of new media, Anonymous, the WELL, hacktivism
  • Representations of trolls, hackers, flash mobs, rebels in broadcasting and international media

Submission Procedure

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit papers for the International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation.

Reviews will be conducted by the relevant Editorial Reviewing Committee for the journal on the basis of peer review, consisting of those with specialisms in the area of the paper submitted.

The Editorial Reviewing Committee will first consider whether the paper will be of interest to the journal’s readers and its potential to draw interest and citation from the wider academic sphere.

Papers must follow APA style for reference citations and be in Microsoft Word format.

NB. Papers can be submitted any time during the year for review. Successful papers for the journal will be give a letter of approval so the authors can put their publication on their CVs prior to publication.

All submissions and inquiries should be directed to the editorial board of The International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation:

Editorial Reviewing Committee

Permanent Chair and Editor-in-Chief: Jonathan Bishop
Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, European Parliament, Brussels, BE
E-mail: jonathan.bishop@crocels.ac.uk

Publicity Co-ordinator (Authors): Jason Barratt
Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, Swansea, Wales.
E-mail: jason.barratt@crocels.ac.uk

Publicity Co-ordinator (CFPs): Jeremy, McDonagh
Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, Swansea, Wales.
Email: jeremy.mcdonagh@crocels.ac.uk

The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives

The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The rise of social networking services have furthered the proliferation of online communities, transferring the power of controlling access to content from often one person who operates a system (sysop), which they would normally rely on, to them personally. With increased participation in social networking and services come new problems and issues, such as trolling, where unconstructive messages are posted to incite a reaction, and lurking, where persons refuse to participate. Methods of dealing with these abuses included defriending, which can include blocking strangers. The Gamified Flow of Persuasion model is proposed, building on work in ecological cognition and the participation continuum, the chapter shows how all of these models can collectively be used with gamification principles to increase participation in online communities through effective management of lurking, trolling, and defriending.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2014). The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Education, and Psychological Issues. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-psychology-of-trolling-and-lurking-defriending-gamification.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2013). The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Examining the Concepts, Issues, and Implications of Internet Trolling. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-psychology-of-trolling-and-lurking-defriending-gamification.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2012). The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives. In: H. Li (Ed.) Virtual Community Participation and Motivation: Cross-Disciplinary Theories. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-psychology-of-trolling-and-lurking-defriending-gamification.pdf