Tag Archives: Robin Hood

The Robin Hood Character Test Online and on Paper: An accurate personality assessment tool or a case of the Forer Effect?

The Robin Hood Character Test Online and on Paper: An accurate personality assessment tool or a case of the Forer Effect?

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The Robin Hood legends have spread throughout the world in many different centuries, perhaps even more so in the 20th and 21st centuries due to the Internet. The Robin Hood Character Test, which spread around offices in paper format in the 1980s has seen a resurgence in the 21st century due to its posting to personality websites and weblogs. The test claims to be able to accurately predict someone’s personality though asking them to place the characters in the story they are asked to read in the order they most value their behaviour. This study finds that the perceived accuracy of this test can be put down to the Farer Effect and also finds that the Forer Effect is more apparent when the test is conducted online than when it is conducted on paper.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (In Press). The Robin Hood Character Test Online and on Paper: An accurate personality assessment tool or a case of the Forer Effect? International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation.

Ranulf de Blondeville – First Lord of the Trolls

Ranulf de Blondeville – First Lord of the Trolls

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Ranulf de Blondeville was the 6th Earl of Chester and 1st Earl of Lincoln. He is famously referred to alongside Robin Hood in Piers Plowman. Ranulf has been portrayed as a trouble-maker with a strong independent streak. This paper compares Ranulf with contemporary Internet trolls. This involves looking at not only how Ranulf III of Chester’s activities compare with Internet trolls, but also how many of the Robin Hood legends might emanate from the activities and stories associated with this particular Ranulf Earl of Chester.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (In Press). Ranulf de Blondeville – First Lord of the Trolls. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation.

My name is Robin Hood: Comparing pseudonym use in crime records and popular culture during the reigns of John I, Henry III and Edward I with Cyberspace

My name is Robin Hood: Comparing pseudonym use in crime records and popular culture during the reigns of John I, Henry III and Edward I with Cyberspace

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

It is known that one of the earliest references to Robin Hood is the literary work, ‘Piers Plowman.’ For centuries scholars have tried to find out who the real Robin Hood was. At present many are willing to accept that Robin Hood was no more than a myth. Whilst this paper does not seek to disagree with that consensus, it aims to show that the use of pseudonyms during the reigns of King John I, King Henry III and Edward I, seeks as much association with this myth at this time as pseudonym use in Cyberspace does today.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (In Press). My name is Robin Hood: Comparing pseudonym use in crime records and popular culture during the reigns of John I, Henry III and Edward I with Cyberspace. The International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 4(1)

Godliness next to Anonymous: Anti-establishment rhetoric in Robin Hood ballads and contemporary media texts

Godliness next to Anonymous: Anti-establishment rhetoric in Robin Hood ballads and contemporary media texts

Jonathan Bishop

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Godliness next to Anonymous: Anti-establishment rhetoric in Robin Hood ballads and contemporary media texts. The International Association of Robin Hood Studies (IARHS’2015) Conference. University Centre, Doncaster.

Viewing Robin Hood and Anonymous as embodiments of non-conformity: A comparative analysis of media-texts used for provoking thoughts of protest, disobedience and idealism

Viewing Robin Hood and Anonymous as embodiments of non-conformity: A comparative analysis of media-texts used for provoking thoughts of protest, disobedience and idealism

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The truth surrounding the existence and origin of Robin Hood has evaded scholars from multiple disciplines for centuries. Robin Hood has been linked to persons or characters in court rolls, plays and other documented references. Some of the oldest records of this infamous and elusive personality include the ballads. These are not however the only media texts referring to Robin Hood, as he has featured in films, TV series, music and video games also. Akin to Robin Hood are the protest movement Anonymous. A group of hacktivists, representing modern day bandits, the comparisons between Robin Hood and Anonymous are endless. This paper examines media-texts relating to Robin Hood in a critical manner and proposes that he exists not as a person but as a metaphor for free speech and anti-establishment sentiment, much in the same way that Anonymous is used today. The paper explores how Robin Hood has been used by the peasants and aristocracy alike to reflect their ideas and ideals relating to the establishment, as a fairy tale, an antidote to economic depressions and for the romanticism associated with the legend. This is compared and contrasted with the same uses of Anonymous, including the ‘Guy Fawkes mask’ that is like Robin’s hood. The paper concludes that even if it is the case that Robin Hood exists only as a metaphor, as Anonymous does to media consumers, it still needs to be established why the rhymes were of ‘Robin Hood’ and not another name or concept.

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Citation

  • Jonathan Bishop (2014). Viewing Robin Hood and Anonymous as embodiments of non-conformity: A comparative analysis of media-texts used for provoking thoughts of protest, disobedience and idealism. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 1(2), pp.29-51

The autistic qualities of Robin Hood: Ardent leader or detached brigand?

The autistic qualities of Robin Hood: Ardent leader or detached brigand?

Jonathan Bishop

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2007). The autistic qualities of Robin Hood: Ardent leader or detached brigand? Speech to the 2007 Conference of the International Association of Robin Hood Studies. Gregynog Hall, Gregynog, Powys.

A guide to Robin Hood and Northern England

A guide to Robin Hood and Northern England

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The overall objective of the project is to develop an educational web site that will act as an innovative resource and reference site. The subject I have chosen is ‘Robin Hood’, because it is an interest I have that I believe would make a good topic for an educational web site. The site will be entered into The Times Student Web Site Award.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2000). A guide to Robin Hood and Northern England. Submitted in part fulfillment of the HND in Multimedia: Pontypridd, UK: University of Glamorgan.