Tag Archives: Quantitative Research

Embodying Trust in the Electoral System: The role of Delegated Transferable Voting for increasing voter choice and representation of small political parties in the digital age

Embodying Trust in the Electoral System: The role of Delegated Transferable Voting for increasing voter choice and representation of small political parties in the digital age

Jonathan Bishop and Mark Beech

Abstract

This paper proposes a new method for distributing votes in democratic elections in such a way that allows for the public to put their trust in independent candidates or those from small political parties. Using the case of a party founded by the authors called The Pluralist Party the paper presents primary data to evaluate the effectiveness of the method – called delegated transferable voting (DTV). Using an auto-ethnographical empirical study in which one of the authors plays a significant role as anthropologist, the paper finds that DTV is more likely to lead to the election of independent candidates over party political ones. Pluralism advocates the election of those who are independent of political party whips in order to best represent the people. The election of independent candidates or small parties is a model of pluralism that can achieve this. The empirical study, through investigating the campaigning methods used by The Pluralist Party, shows that putting effort into an election – whether money, materials or labour and however funded – can improve outcomes for political parties. Making use of official government data in addition to the collected data showed that a higher number of votes for the Pluralist Party was associated with a higher education level, more rooms in a household, a lower number of people not in education, employment or training, and a lower ‘knol,’ which is a unit for measuring brain activity.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop and Mark Beech (2016). Embodying Trust in the Electoral System: The Role of Delegated Transferable Voting for Increasing Voter Choice and Representation of Small Political Parties in the Digital Age. International Journal of E-Politics (IJEP), 7(2), 37-50. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/embodying-trust-in-the-electoral-system-role-of-delegated-transferable-voting.pdf

The Role of Geo-Demographic Big Data for Assessing the Effectiveness of Crowd-Funded Software Projects: A Case Example of “QPress”

The Role of Geo-Demographic Big Data for Assessing the Effectiveness of Crowd-Funded Software Projects: A Case Example of “QPress”

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The current phenomenon of Big Data – the use of datasets that are too big for traditional business analysis tools used in industry – is driving a shift in how social and economic problems are understood and analysed. This chapter explores the role Big Data can play in analysing the effectiveness of crowd-funding projects, using the data from such a project, which aimed to fund the development of a software plug-in called ‘QPress’. Data analysed included the website metrics of impressions, clicks and average position, which were found to be significantly connected with geographical factors using an ANOVA. These were combined with other country data to perform t-tests in order to form a geo-demographic understanding of those who are displayed advertisements inviting participation in crowd-funding. The chapter concludes that there are a number of interacting variables and that for Big Data studies to be effective, their amalgamation with other data sources, including linked data, is essential to providing an overall picture of the social phenomenon being studied.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). The Role of Geo-Demographic Big Data for Assessing the Effectiveness of Crowd-Funded Software Projects: A Case Example of “QPress.” In B. Bozkaya, & V. Singh (Eds.) Geo-Intelligence and Visualization through Big Data Trends (pp. 94-120). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-role-of-geo-demographic-big-data-for-assessing-the-effectiveness-of-crowd-funded-software-projects-a-case-example-of-qpress.pdf

The Impacts of Alcohol on E-Dating Activity: Increases in Flame Trolling Corresponds with Higher Alcohol Consumption

The Impacts of Alcohol on E-Dating Activity: Increases in Flame Trolling Corresponds with Higher Alcohol Consumption

Jason Barratt and Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The impact of alcohol on Internet use is relatively unexplored. This chapter presents the results of a study conducted over a period of 1 year, which investigated whether persons who stated on their e-dating profile that they drank alcohol were more or less likely to contact another person. The study found that increased consumption of alcohol resulted in a person posting more flames (i.e. abusive posts) to their target. No such difference existed in terms of whether a person drank alcohol in relation to whether they had a low education, spoke more about themselves, their target, or whether they posted kudos to their targets. The chapter concludes that further research is needed to uncover the effects of alcohol on participation in social networking services, so that young people, like Liam Stacey and Isabella Sorley are not unfairly targeted for Internet trolling.

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Reference

Jason Barratt and Jonathan Bishop (2015). The Impacts of Alcohol on E-Dating Activity: Increases in Flame Trolling Corresponds with Higher Alcohol Consumption. In J. Bishop (Ed.), Psychological and Social Implications Surrounding Internet and Gaming Addiction (pp. 186-197). IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-impacts-of-alcohol-on-e-dating-activity.pdf

Using “On-the-Fly Corpus Linguistics” to Systematically Derive Word Definitions Using Inductive Abstraction and Reductionist Correlation Analysis: Considering Seductive and Gratifying Properties of Computer Jargon

Using “On-the-Fly Corpus Linguistics” to Systematically Derive Word Definitions Using Inductive Abstraction and Reductionist Correlation Analysis: Considering Seductive and Gratifying Properties of Computer Jargon

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Computer jargon is something that can either unite people, or draw them apart. This chapter looks at definitions of the terms, ‘trolling,’ ‘flame,’ ‘flame-war’ and ‘lurking,’ as presented in specialist dictionaries, newspapers and through a survey of laypersons. The aim of the chapter was to see whether it was possible to objectively define terms using a quantitative analysis of qualitative data. The study finds that objectively determining a definition of a term requires a bigger dataset than is used for qualitative studies. It further notes that whilst there is a lot in common with expert definitions, the problem with drawing definitions from others is that whilst it might produce objective definitions they might not be accurate ones.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2015). On-the-Fly Corpus Linguistics” to Systematically Derive Word Definitions Using Inductive Abstraction and Reductionist Correlation Analysis: Considering Seductive and Gratifying Properties of Computer Jargon. In: Jonathan Bishop (Ed.) Psychological and Social Implications Surrounding Internet and Gaming Addiction. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/using-on-the-fly-corpus-linguistics-to-systematically-derive-word-definitions-using-inductive-abstraction-and-reducationist-correlation-analysis.pdf

Determining the Risk of Digital Addiction to Adolescent Targets of Internet Trolling: Implications for the UK Legal System

Determining the Risk of Digital Addiction to Adolescent Targets of Internet Trolling: Implications for the UK Legal System

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Research on digital addiction has been increasing significantly since the start of the 2010s. What is not currently available is a measurement scale to assess the extent to which adolescents are at risk of abuse on the Internet that might lead them to develop digital addiction. This chapter sets out to develop a check-list that can be used to risk assess those youths who might be at risk of digital addiction. Through using data from a study into 1,828 young people aged 9-16, the study devised a 6-point check-list based on using a t-test to determine those at high risk and those at low risk. The check-list can be seen as a reliable way for screening those adolescents for whom concerns are raised over their online activities. The chapter concludes that further research will be needed to test the scale with people in older age ranges.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Determining the Risk of Digital Addiction to Adolescent Targets of Internet Trolling: Implications for the UK Legal System. In J. Bishop (Ed.), Psychological and Social Implications Surrounding Internet and Gaming Addiction (pp. 31-42). IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/determining-the-risk-of-digital-addiction-to-adolescent-targets-of-internet-trolling.pdf

Dealing with Internet Trolling in Political Online Communities: Towards the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale

Dealing with Internet Trolling in Political Online Communities: Towards the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Internet trolling has become a popularly used term to describe the posting of any content on the Internet which is provocative or offensive. This is different from the original meaning online in the 1990s, which referred to the posting of provocative messages for humourous effect. Those systems operators (sysops) who run online communities are finding they are being targeted because of abuse posted on their platforms. Political discussion groups are some of the most prone to trolling, whether consensual or unwanted. Many such websites ara open for anyone to join, meaning when some members post messages they know are offensive but legal, others might find grossly offensive, meaning these messages could be illegal. This paper develops a questionnaire called the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale (TIWWCHNT-20), which aims to help sysops better plan the development of online communities to take account of different users’ capacity to be offended, and for users to self-assess whether they will be suited to an online community. The scale is discussed in relation to different Internet posting techniques where different users will act differently.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Dealing with Internet Trolling in Political Online Communities: Towards the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale. International Journal of E-Politics 5(4), 1-20. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/dealing-with-internet-trolling-in-political-online-communities-towards-the-this-is-why-we-cant-have-nice-things-scale.pdf

Trolling Is Not Just a Art. It Is an Science: The Role of Automated Affective Content Screening in Regulating Digital Media and Reducing Risk of Trauma

Trolling Is Not Just a Art. It Is an Science: The Role of Automated Affective Content Screening in Regulating Digital Media and Reducing Risk of Trauma

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter seeks to explore the role media content ratings play in the age of “Internet trolling” and other electronic media issues like “sexting.” Using ANOVA to validate a four-factor approach to media ratings based on maturity, the chapter finds the ability of a person to withstand various media content, measured in “knol,” which is the brain’s capacity to process information, can be used to calculate media ratings. The study concludes it is feasible to have brain-computer interfaces for PCs and kiosks to test the maturity of vulnerable persons and recommend to parents/guardians or cinema managers whether or not to allow someone access to the content they wish to consume. This could mean that computer software could be programmed to automatically censor content that person is likely to be distressed or grossly offended by. Public policy issues relating to these supply-side interventions are discussed.

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Trolling Is Not Just a Art. It Is an Science: The Role of Automated Affective Content Screening in Regulating Digital Media and Reducing Risk of Trauma. In: Maria Manuela Cruz-Cunha & Irene Maria Portela (Eds.). Handbook of Research on
Digital Crime, Cyberspace Security, and Information Assurance. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/trolling-is-not-just-a-art-it-is-an-science.pdf

Transforming Lurkers into Posters: The role of the Participation Continuum

Transforming Lurkers into Posters: The role of the Participation Continuum

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Increasing participation has long been seen as a way additional to new technology of helping online communities to grow. Online community managers may well advertise their website on other service platforms, but with up 90% of the visitors to their site being non-participants, referred to as lurkers, they could do no better than improving their website to tackle lurker fears. This paper presents the ‘participation continuum’ for understanding why some users are posters, and do participate, and why others are lurkers, and do not contribute. The paper considers lurkers as victims of the failures of those manage online communities to encourage involvement from them by combating the fears they have. The main fears of lurkers are explored and solutions for overcoming them explained and a study is presented using the participation continuum, which confirms the hypothesis of lurkers being similar to those with social phobia.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2011). Transforming Lurkers into Posters: The role of the Participation Continuum. In: In: V. Grout, R. Picking & D. Oram (Eds.) Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Internet Technologies and Applications (ITA11), 6 September 2011, Wrexham, UK: University of Wales Press. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/transforming-lurkers-into-posters-the-role-of-the-participation-continuum.pdf

Enhancing the understanding of genres of web-based communities: the role of the ecological cognition framework

Enhancing the understanding of genres of web-based communities: The role of the ecological cognition framework

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Web-based communities have been an interest of social science researchers since the dawn of the millennium. To date, much research into them has focused on the methods to enhance community building and understand those who do not participate in community life, known as lurkers. This paper explores web-based communities as a type of media, classifying types of web-based community such as message boards, chat groups and weblogs as genres. A methodology is proposed based on the Ecological Cognition Framework (ECF) for reading these web-based communities in order to determine their genre and subgenre. Utilising both quantitative and qualitative methods to assess the images, text and other artefacts in these web-based communities, two specific sub-genres of the weblogs and directories genre emerge as the political blog and the mommy blog and these are compared with the significant differences that are found between them that make them solid subgenres.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2009). Enhancing the understanding of genres of web-based communities: The role of the ecological cognition framework. International Journal of Web-Based Communities, 5(1), 4-17. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/enhancing-the-understanding-of-genres-of-web-based-communities-the-role-of-the-ecological-cognition-framework.pdf