Tag Archives: Project Management Research

Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews

Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Designing an effective organisational architecture for an undertaking can be considered essential to its success. The way an organisation is designed – or otherwise appears to its workers – will affect the extent to which those workers associated with it can be effective at their jobs. This chapter undertakes a case study using Big Data from a project called “QPress” that was run by an organisation that is based around contingent working and inter-professionalism. Important things drawn from the data collected from the study include the importance of the Cloud to distance working, such as teleworking; the identity of the organisation and how workers relate to it; as well as what factors assist or inhibit worker motivation. The study concludes that the organisational structure of the organisation investigated – where different firms perform different tasks could be seen as best practice in supporting inter-professional environments.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews. The International Conference on Information and Knowledge Engineering (IKE’15).

The Role of Geo-Demographic Big Data for Assessing the Effectiveness of Crowd-Funded Software Projects: A Case Example of “QPress”

The Role of Geo-Demographic Big Data for Assessing the Effectiveness of Crowd-Funded Software Projects: A Case Example of “QPress”

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The current phenomenon of Big Data – the use of datasets that are too big for traditional business analysis tools used in industry – is driving a shift in how social and economic problems are understood and analysed. This chapter explores the role Big Data can play in analysing the effectiveness of crowd-funding projects, using the data from such a project, which aimed to fund the development of a software plug-in called ‘QPress’. Data analysed included the website metrics of impressions, clicks and average position, which were found to be significantly connected with geographical factors using an ANOVA. These were combined with other country data to perform t-tests in order to form a geo-demographic understanding of those who are displayed advertisements inviting participation in crowd-funding. The chapter concludes that there are a number of interacting variables and that for Big Data studies to be effective, their amalgamation with other data sources, including linked data, is essential to providing an overall picture of the social phenomenon being studied.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). The Role of Geo-Demographic Big Data for Assessing the Effectiveness of Crowd-Funded Software Projects: A Case Example of “QPress.” In B. Bozkaya, & V. Singh (Eds.) Geo-Intelligence and Visualization through Big Data Trends (pp. 94-120). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-role-of-geo-demographic-big-data-for-assessing-the-effectiveness-of-crowd-funded-software-projects-a-case-example-of-qpress.pdf

Organisational Architecture and Learning in an Inter-Professional Context: A Case-Study of an Agile Crowd-Funded Software Project Using Contingent Working

Organisational Architecture and Learning in an Inter-Professional Context: A Case-Study of an Agile Crowd-Funded Software Project Using Contingent Working

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Designing an effective organisational architecture for an undertaking can be considered essential to its success. The way an organisation is designed – or otherwise appears to its workers – will affect the extent to which those workers associated with it can be effective at their jobs. This chapter undertakes a case study into an organisation that is based around contingent working and inter-professionalism. Important things drawn from the study include the importance of the Cloud to distance working, such as teleworking; the identity of the organisation and how workers relate to it; as well as what factors assist on inhibit worker motivation. The study concludes that the organisational structure of the organisation investigated – where different firms perform different tasks, could be seen as best practice in supporting inter-professional environments.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2016). Organisational Architecture and Learning in an Inter-Professional Context: A Case-Study of an Agile Crowd-Funded Software Project Using Contingent Working. In G. Jamil, J. Poças-Rascão, F. Ribeiro, & A. Malheiro da Silva (Eds.) Handbook of Research on Information Architecture and Management in Modern Organizations. IGI Global, Hershey, PA (Pages 274-291)

A Learning Organisation Approach to Software Project Management: Promoting Knowledge Transformation and Interprofessionalism through Crowd-Funded Agile Development

A Learning Organisation Approach to Software Project Management: Promoting Knowledge Transformation and Interprofessionalism through Crowd-Funded Agile Development

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter explores how a learning organisation differs from a teaching organisation, such as that each person holds responsibility for their own learning, yet are supported and guided by those who wish to help them further their personal development. This chapter aims to develop a software project management methodology, based on existing approaches, which can accommodate all people, regardless of ability. The model developed, called the C2-Tech-S2 approach, is specifically designed for projects that use crowd-funding and agile development, particularly in environments based around the Cloud. A pilot study is carried out to demonstrate the ‘technology’ stage of this model for assessment using the ‘support’ stage. This finds that all stages of the model need to be applied in a project, because on their own the stages may not produce the most effective outcomes in terms of increased participation.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). A Learning Organisation Approach to Software Project Management: Promoting Knowledge Transformation and Interprofessionalism through Crowd-Funded Agile Development. In A. Singh (Ed.), Achieving Enterprise Agility through Innovative Software Development. IGI Global, Hershey, PA (Pages 115-140). Available online at: http://www.jonathanbishop.com/Library/Documents/EN/docIGIPaper_C2TechS2.pdf

Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives

Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter presents a case study of The Emotivate Project and the role it played in the didactic education of 11 school-age children from the former coalfields communities of Llantwit Fardre and Pontypridd in Wales in the United Kingdom through blended learning (bLearning) and blended twinning (bTwinning). The chapter shows how the Emotivate Projects provides evidence to show that UK Government’s Big Society policy depends, not on additional government intervention beyond finance, but partnerships on the basis of responsible capitalism and community co-operativism, involving all three market sectors – people, private and public. By using the capital and ‘payment in kind’ of responsible capitalist firms, in addition to charitable funding and government grants means partnerships across sectors can provide a significant degree of match funding for Big Society projects. The chapter recommends that the private sector get involved in increasing efficiency in Big Society run on a people sector basis, through taking advantage of outsourcing. This enabled them to fulfil their social or moral causes through didactic activism with better value for money due to efficiency savings in overhead costs.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives. In: P.M. Pumilia-Gnarini, E, Favaron, E. Pacetti, J. Bishop, L, Guerra (Eds.) Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education Incorporating Advancements. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/lessons-from-the-emotivate-project-for-increasing-take-up-of-big-society-and-responsible-capitalism-initiatives.pdf

The role of mediating artifacts in the design of persuasive e-learning systems

The role of mediating artifacts in the design of persuasive e-learning systems

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

E-learning applications are becoming commonplace in the networked classroom, as educators search for new ways of engaging their learners. Traditional methods of designing these systems have focussed the tasks users are likely to complete as opposed to designing them to persuade the user to develop knowledge or learn about topics. Successful e-learning systems allow the user to interact with the environment using mediating artefacts, which are conductors for action within these environments. Mediating artefacts take many forms, in Internet applications they often manifest in the form of text that affords clicking, whereas in graphical environments they are often icons that afford dragging. Many e-learning systems are based around mediating artefacts, but few of these have been designed to encourage learners to carry actions in order to meet their own goals. This paper investigates how mediating artefacts can be made persuasive and suggests a scenario-based design model to aid developers in making e-learning systems persuasive and orientated around the goals of learners.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2005). The role of mediating artifacts in the design of persuasive e-learning systems. In: Proceedings of the First International Conferences on Internet Technologies and Applications, Wrexham: University of Wales Press, pp. 54-62. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-role-of-mediating-artifacts-in-the-design-of-persuasive-e-learning-systems.pdf

Evaluation-Centred Design of E-Learning Communities: A Case Study and Review

Evaluation-Centred Design of E-Learning Communities: A Case Study and Review

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This paper describes a proposal for a evaluation-centred design model based on use of the Star Lifecycle over a number of years in different industries. This paper outlines the five stages of a new star lifecycle, which are based on the various sectors of the e-learning industry, those being Consulting, Content, Technology, Services, and Support. The methods, tools and techniques for carrying out each of the five development stages are evaluated, with examples and practices from the development of systems in three projects, including Llantrisant Online. These practices are reviewed and modern practices, such as the use of scenarios in the design process are highlighted.

Full Text

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2007). Evaluation-Centred Design of E-Learning Communities: A Case Study and Review. In: V. Grout, D. Oram & R. Picking (eds.). Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Internet Technologies and Applications (ITA07 edn.). University of Wales Press: Wrexham, pp. 1-9. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/evaluation-centred-designed-of-e-learning-communities-a-case-study-and-review.pdf

Increasing membership in online communities: The five principles of managing virtual club economies

Increasing membership in online communities: The five principles of managing virtual club economies

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

It has been argued that the consumption of club goods, where access to them is excludable and non-rivalrous, requires optimal exclusion as well as inclusion. Increasing membership appears to be a particular concern for providers of online communities and in addition increasing the participation of the membership also seems to be important. This paper defines online communities as virtual club economies, as they often exist to allow their members to share club goods. The paper explores various social networking services, finding that those with the highest number of subscriptions follow the guidelines proposed in an influential book on online communities and proposes five principles of managing these virtual club economies. These require as part of a strategy for providers to know their technology, know their subject matter, know their stratum of the wider virtual economy, know their policies and know their purpose. Each of these principles is elaborated on and the paper concludes that the ultimate purpose of a virtual club economy is to maximise the availability of its club goods, such as content to meet its inward goals of sustaining its existence and providing for its membership and wider objectives that suggest a purpose to outsiders and give insiders the motivation to remain as members.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2009). Increasing membership in online communities: The five principles of managing virtual club economies. Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Internet Technologies and Applications – ITA09. Wrexham: University of Wales Press. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-membership-in-online-communities-the-five-principles-of-virtual-club-economies.pdf