Tag Archives: Organisational architecture

Call for Papers – Special Issue on Organisational Architecture Beyond E-Government

Special Issue on Organisational Architecture Beyond E-Government

International Journal of Public Administration in the Digital Age

Submission Due Date

15 October 2016

Introduction

Organizational architecture is the area of study concerned with the optimal way to design an organization to achieve its aims. Much research relating to politics and policy in the digital age with respect to organizational architecture has focused on e-government in terms of making government functions available to the public via the Internet. However, the reform needed to government bodies in order to cope with the new challenges in the digital age, such as from cyber-crime, cyber-terrorism and cyber-warfare are often overlooked when information strategies are put together.

Objective

The aim of this special issue is to look at the how the organizational architecture of government organisations need to change to cope with the new threats that exist in the digital age, which were not envisaged when e-government as a concept was defined. The importance of government departments sharing data is becoming more evident, as is the situation where the provision of government security services, such as policing and other law enforcement, at a local rather than national level is proving in effective in dealing with cyber-crime, where the criminals are unlikely to be in the same locality as their victim. This special issue will therefore look at the changes that can be made to the organizational architectures of public authorities to respond to the problems that have come into existence in the digital age.

Recommended Topics

Topics to be discussed in this special issue include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Restructuring of government departments and agencies
  • Abolition, reduction or replacement of specific government services
  • Administration of tax collecting and financial monitoring systems
  • Approaches to achieving peace and security in a global context
  • Means for facilitating cooperation between different national governments
  • Detection and response to threats both inside and outside the organization

Guest Editors

  • Councillor Jonathan Bishop, Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, Swansea, Wales
  • Jason Barratt, Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, Swansea, Wales
  • Jeremy McDonagh, Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, Swansea, Wales

Submission Procedure

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit papers for this special theme issue on Organizational architecture beyond e-government on or before October 15, 2016 . All submissions must be original and may not be under review by another publication. Please follow the following link to the submission system:

INTERESTED AUTHORS SHOULD CONSULT THE JOURNAL’S GUIDELINES FOR MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSIONS at:

All submitted papers will be reviewed on a double-blind, peer review basis. Papers must follow APA style for reference citations .

All submissions and inquiries should be directed to the attention of:

  • Councillor Jonathan Bishop

The Need for Separating University Management and Administration from Service Delivery: Reviewing Disability Policy at Four HEIs in Wales

The Need for Separating University Management and Administration from Service Delivery: Reviewing Disability Policy at Four HEIs in Wales

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter looks at how suitable the current equality policies of Wales’s universities are to compete in the current economic climate and the changes needed to deliver best value to people with disabilities and all other taxpayers. The chapter makes the finding that universities are too bloated, by carrying out functions, which in Wales could be better handled by the public sector that is under direct control of the Welsh Government’s education minister. This would involve learning from how the telecoms and energy companies work UK wide, so that HEFCfW becomes an infrastructure provider, Estyn would become responsible for ensuring the equality of access to higher education and ensuring the standards of university education. Universities would thus consist mainly of teaching and research staff, optimising how they use the infrastructure to attract the most students to their degrees, which are homogenised. The chapter makes clear, however, that whilst this policy would likely work in Wales, it would be unlikely to in England, perhaps allowing “clear red water” between governments.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2016). The Need for Separating University Management and Administration from Service Delivery: Reviewing Disability Policy at Four HEIs in Wales. In: Nwachukwu Prince Ololube (Ed.) Handbook of Research on Organizational Justice and Culture in Higher Education Institutions. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. (pages 365-382). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/reviewing-disability-policy-at-four-hei-in-wales.pdf

Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews

Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Designing an effective organisational architecture for an undertaking can be considered essential to its success. The way an organisation is designed – or otherwise appears to its workers – will affect the extent to which those workers associated with it can be effective at their jobs. This chapter undertakes a case study using Big Data from a project called “QPress” that was run by an organisation that is based around contingent working and inter-professionalism. Important things drawn from the data collected from the study include the importance of the Cloud to distance working, such as teleworking; the identity of the organisation and how workers relate to it; as well as what factors assist or inhibit worker motivation. The study concludes that the organisational structure of the organisation investigated – where different firms perform different tasks could be seen as best practice in supporting inter-professional environments.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews. The International Conference on Information and Knowledge Engineering (IKE’15).

Organisational Architecture and Learning in an Inter-Professional Context: A Case-Study of an Agile Crowd-Funded Software Project Using Contingent Working

Organisational Architecture and Learning in an Inter-Professional Context: A Case-Study of an Agile Crowd-Funded Software Project Using Contingent Working

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Designing an effective organisational architecture for an undertaking can be considered essential to its success. The way an organisation is designed – or otherwise appears to its workers – will affect the extent to which those workers associated with it can be effective at their jobs. This chapter undertakes a case study into an organisation that is based around contingent working and inter-professionalism. Important things drawn from the study include the importance of the Cloud to distance working, such as teleworking; the identity of the organisation and how workers relate to it; as well as what factors assist on inhibit worker motivation. The study concludes that the organisational structure of the organisation investigated – where different firms perform different tasks, could be seen as best practice in supporting inter-professional environments.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2016). Organisational Architecture and Learning in an Inter-Professional Context: A Case-Study of an Agile Crowd-Funded Software Project Using Contingent Working. In G. Jamil, J. Poças-Rascão, F. Ribeiro, & A. Malheiro da Silva (Eds.) Handbook of Research on Information Architecture and Management in Modern Organizations. IGI Global, Hershey, PA (Pages 274-291)

What’s in a Game: The Politics of Shaping Property Tax Administration in Bangalore City India

What’s in a Game: The Politics of Shaping Property Tax Administration in Bangalore City India

Shefali Virkar

Abstract

Much has been written about e-government within a growing stream of literature on ICT for development, generating countervailing perspectives where optimistic, technocratic approaches are countered by far more sceptical standpoints on technological innovation. This body of work is, however, not without its limitations: a large proportion is anecdotal in its style and overly deterministic in its logic, with far less being empirical, and there is a tendency for models offered up by scholarly research to neglect the actual attitudes, choices, and behaviour of the wide array of actors involved in the implementation and use of new technology in real organisations. Drawing on the theoretical perspectives of the Ecology of Games framework and the Design-Actuality Gap model, this chapter focuses on the conception and implementation of an electronic property tax collection system in Bangalore (India) between 1998 and 2008. The work contributes to not just an understanding of the role of ICTs in public administrative reform, but also towards an emerging body of research that is critical of managerial rationalism for an organization as a whole, and which is sensitive to an ecology of actors, choices, and motivations within the organisation.

Full Text

Citation

Shefali Virkar (2014). What’s in a Game? The Politics of Shaping Property Tax Administration in Bangalore, India’ in Jonathan Bishop (ed.) Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational, and Psychological Issues (pp. 31-51), IGI Global, Hershey, PA.

Transforming the UK Home Office into a Department for Homeland Security: Reflecting on an Interview with a Litigant Defending Against Online Retaliatory Feedback in the US

Transforming the UK Home Office into a Department for Homeland Security: Reflecting on an Interview with a Litigant Defending Against Online Retaliatory Feedback in the US

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Retaliatory feedback is a significant problem on the Internet, which is not just confined to online auction websites, but other online environments dependent on reputation systems. Explored in this paper are the acts of an Internet troller who spread malicious and false allegations that the series of conferences called WORLDCOMP are “fake.” This paper interviews one of the organisers of this conference to ask how they went about dealing with the retaliatory feedback, and in particular their engagement with law enforcement agencies, such as from the FBI to the US Department of Homeland Security. To reform the UK Home Office to learn lessons from this, the paper proposes making greater use of National Crime Agency and Police and Crime Commissioners to provide a better strategic set-up for law enforcement under the UK Home Office. It also suggest using publicly funded solicitors and community wardens, as opposed to the current set-up of police constables, to deal with community policing.

References

  • Jonathan Bishop (2017). Transforming the UK Home Office into a Department for Homeland Security: Reflecting on an Interview with a Litigant Defending Against Online Retaliatory Feedback in the US. International Journal of Public Administration in the Digital Age.
  • Jonathan Bishop (2014). Transforming the UK Home Office into a Department for Homeland Security: Reflecting on an Interview with a Litigant Defending Against Online Retaliatory Feedback in the US. Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management 11(4), 511-531.
  • Jonathan Bishop (2016). Retraction of: Transforming the UK Home Office into a Department for Homeland Security: Reflecting on an Interview with a Litigant Defending Against Online Retaliatory Feedback in the US. Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management 13(1), 1-21.

Microeconomics of Education and the effect of Government intervention: The role of Classroom 2.0 in facilitating the UK Government’s schools policies

Microeconomics of Education and the effect of Government intervention: The role of Classroom 2.0 in facilitating the UK Government’s schools policies

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

While the concept of Classroom 2.0 has been around for over a decade, the concept of electronic and distance learning as a mode to improve education outcomes has existed ever since the first broadcast of television programs carrying educational content. The governments in the United Kingdom have always sought to intervene in education, whether this has been allowing schools to opt-out of local authority control with grant-maintained schools under Margaret Thatcher, co-operative trusts under Tony Blair or free schools under David Cameron. Not all government interventions are as successful. Homogenized one-size-fits-all education based on catchment areas such as Comprehensive Schools, and State-run projects like the UK e-University have been shown to lack the return on investment of Specialist and Independent Schools and the Open University. This paper reviews some of the microeconomic models used by governments to intervene in the market for instructional services, including e-participation in education, namely Classroom 2.0. It also looks at some of the possibilities of Classroom 2.0 in education systems that have been affected by UK and respective devolved government’s education policy.

Full Text

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Microeconomics of Education and the effect of Government intervention: The role of Classroom 2.0 in facilitating the UK Government’s schools policies. In: Jonathan Bishop (Ed.) Transforming Politics and Policy in the Digital Age. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/microeconomics-of-education-and-the-effect-of-government-intervention.pdf