Tag Archives: Online Participation

Developing and Validating the “This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale”: Optimising Political Online Communities for Internet Trolling

Developing and Validating the “This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale”: Optimising Political Online Communities for Internet Trolling

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Internet trolling describes the posting of any content on the Internet which is provocative or offensive, which is different from the original meaning online in the 1990s, referring to the posting of messages for humourous effect. Those systems operators (sysops) who run online communities are being targeted because of abuse posted on their platforms. Political discussion groups are some of the most prone to trolling, whether consensual or unwanted. Many such websites ara open for anyone to join, meaning when some members post messages they know are offensive but legal, others might find grossly offensive, meaning these messages could be illegal. This paper develops a questionnaire called the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale (TIWWCHNT-20), which aims to help sysops better plan the development of online communities to take account of different users’ capacity to be offended, and for users to self-assess whether they will be suited to an online community. The scale is discussed in relation to different Internet posting techniques where different users will act differently.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2017). Developing and Validating the “This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale”: Optimising Political Online Communities for Internet Trolling. In Y. Ibrahim (Ed.), Politics, Protest, and Empowerment in Digital Spaces (pp. 153-177). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Available at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/developing-and-validating-tiwwchnt-20-scale.pdf

Special Issue: Call for Papers on Pseudonymity

Call for Papers: Special Issue on Pseudonymity

Submission Due Date

15 December 2016

Guest Editor

  • Jonathan Bishop
    • Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, Swansea, Wales.

Journal

The International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation

Introduction

Pseudonymity- a state of disguised identity. On one side of the debate are the world’s largest social network sites, including Facebook and Google+, with both services demanding that people use their real names and advocating the the push towards a “real name” Internet. On the other side of the debate are scholars such as sites such as 4chan and Reddit that view anonymity and pseudonymity as important to how people construct identity online. While much has been written about the benefits of anonymity and pseudonymity, there is a lack of published research examining specific practices enabled by pseudonyms.

Objective

The objective of the proposed Special Issue is to highlight the specific issues and challenges around pseudonymity. Research contributions in this special issue will provide insights about the nature of pseudonymity in relation to technology. The contents in this special issue are of interest for researchers working in the domains of Internet security, online communities, e-participation, cyberculture, e-politics, e-society, sociology, cybercultures and multimedia studies, and cognitive science.

Recommended Topics

The journal welcomes articles, dialogues, notes, book reviews and further comments thereon, in keeping with editorial policy, and areas of interest for this special issue include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Participation inequality; lurking, the free-rider problem
  • Free speech; cyberbantering, cybertrickery, online activism
  • Online harassment; cyberstalking, cyberbulling, porn e-vengers
  • Online deception; grooming, cyberhickery, chatroom bobs
  • Online Community moderation, perspectives on ‘don’t feed the troll’, blocking users (i.e. ban-hammering’)
  • History of new media, Anonymous, the WELL, hacktivism

Submission Procedure

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit papers for this special theme issue on Hypermedia Seduction and Persuasion. All submitted papers will be reviewed on a peer review basis. Papers must follow APA style for reference citations.

NB. Papers can be submitted any time before the deadline, as reviewing will take place throughout the period of the advertising of this call for papers. Successful papers for the special issue will be give a letter of approval so the authors can put their publication on their CVs.

Important Dates

  • Submission Deadline: 15 December 2016
  • Reviews to Authors by: 15 February 2017
  • Final Submissions: 15 March 2017
  • Publication: 30 April 2017

All submissions and inquiries should be directed to the attention of:

Jonathan Bishop FRSA
E-mail: jonathan.bishop@crocels.ac.uk
Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, European Parliament, Brussels, BE.

The Robin Hood Character Test Online and on Paper: An accurate personality assessment tool or a case of the Forer Effect?

The Robin Hood Character Test Online and on Paper: An accurate personality assessment tool or a case of the Forer Effect?

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The Robin Hood legends have spread throughout the world in many different centuries, perhaps even more so in the 20th and 21st centuries due to the Internet. The Robin Hood Character Test, which spread around offices in paper format in the 1980s has seen a resurgence in the 21st century due to its posting to personality websites and weblogs. The test claims to be able to accurately predict someone’s personality though asking them to place the characters in the story they are asked to read in the order they most value their behaviour. This study finds that the perceived accuracy of this test can be put down to the Farer Effect and also finds that the Forer Effect is more apparent when the test is conducted online than when it is conducted on paper.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (In Press). The Robin Hood Character Test Online and on Paper: An accurate personality assessment tool or a case of the Forer Effect? International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation.

Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters

Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The rise of online communities in Internet environments has set in motion an unprecedented shift in power from vendors of goods and services to the customers who buy them, with those vendors who understand this transfer of power and choose to capitalize on it by organizing online communities and being richly rewarded with both peerless customer loyalty and impressive economic returns. A type of online community, the virtual world, could radically alter the way people work, learn, grow consume, and entertain. Understanding the exchange of social and economic capital in online communities could involve looking at what causes actors to spend their resources on improving someone else’s reputation. Actors’ reputations may affect others’ willingness to trade with them or give them gifts. Investigating online communities reveals a large number of different characters and associated avatars. When an actor looks at another’s avatar they will evaluate them and make decisions that are crucial to creating interaction between customers and vendors in virtual worlds based on the exchange of goods and services. This paper utilizes the ecological cognition framework to understand transactions, characters and avatars in virtual worlds and investigates the exchange of capital in a bulletin board and virtual. The chapter finds strong evidence for the existence of characters and stereotypes based on the Ecological Cognition Framework and empirical evidence that actors using avatars with antisocial connotations are more likely to have a lower return on investment and be rated less positively than those with more sophisticated appearing avatars.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2013). Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Examining the Concepts, Issues and Implications of Internet Trolling. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-capital-revenue-in-social-networking-communities-building-social-and-economic-relationships-through-avatars-and-characters.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2011). Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters. In: IRMA (Ed.). Virtual Communities: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools and Applications. IGI Global: Hershey, PA; pages 1720-1734. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-capital-revenue-in-social-networking-communities-building-social-and-economic-relationships-through-avatars-and-characters.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2008). Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters. In: C. Romm-Livermore & K. Setzekorn (Eds.). Social Networking Communities and EDating Services: Concepts and Implications. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-capital-revenue-in-social-networking-communities-building-social-and-economic-relationships-through-avatars-and-characters.pdf

The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives

The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The rise of social networking services have furthered the proliferation of online communities, transferring the power of controlling access to content from often one person who operates a system (sysop), which they would normally rely on, to them personally. With increased participation in social networking and services come new problems and issues, such as trolling, where unconstructive messages are posted to incite a reaction, and lurking, where persons refuse to participate. Methods of dealing with these abuses included defriending, which can include blocking strangers. The Gamified Flow of Persuasion model is proposed, building on work in ecological cognition and the participation continuum, the chapter shows how all of these models can collectively be used with gamification principles to increase participation in online communities through effective management of lurking, trolling, and defriending.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2014). The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Education, and Psychological Issues. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-psychology-of-trolling-and-lurking-defriending-gamification.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2013). The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Examining the Concepts, Issues, and Implications of Internet Trolling. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-psychology-of-trolling-and-lurking-defriending-gamification.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2012). The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives. In: H. Li (Ed.) Virtual Community Participation and Motivation: Cross-Disciplinary Theories. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-psychology-of-trolling-and-lurking-defriending-gamification.pdf

Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives

Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter presents a case study of The Emotivate Project and the role it played in the didactic education of 11 school-age children from the former coalfields communities of Llantwit Fardre and Pontypridd in Wales in the United Kingdom through blended learning (bLearning) and blended twinning (bTwinning). The chapter shows how the Emotivate Projects provides evidence to show that UK Government’s Big Society policy depends, not on additional government intervention beyond finance, but partnerships on the basis of responsible capitalism and community co-operativism, involving all three market sectors – people, private and public. By using the capital and ‘payment in kind’ of responsible capitalist firms, in addition to charitable funding and government grants means partnerships across sectors can provide a significant degree of match funding for Big Society projects. The chapter recommends that the private sector get involved in increasing efficiency in Big Society run on a people sector basis, through taking advantage of outsourcing. This enabled them to fulfil their social or moral causes through didactic activism with better value for money due to efficiency savings in overhead costs.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives. In: P.M. Pumilia-Gnarini, E, Favaron, E. Pacetti, J. Bishop, L, Guerra (Eds.) Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education Incorporating Advancements. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/lessons-from-the-emotivate-project-for-increasing-take-up-of-big-society-and-responsible-capitalism-initiatives.pdf

Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization  for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online

Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization  for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Chatroom Bobs, which derived from the concept of ‘Uncle Bob’ being a name for a less than responsible family man, are characterised by being online community users driven by seeking out satisfaction for their ‘urgeances’ (or biological drives). Some of these are akin to the ‘office loser’ who tries to impress others but is despised, others have more ulterior motives for sexual satisfaction. This paper presents an intervention – called MEDIAT – which uses TAGTeach to retrain people who are sexually damaged by society and demonstrate impairment in how they interact with others. The paper presents an equation for measuring such ‘social orientation impairment’ as a reflection of its relationship to serotonergic and dopaminergic activity in the prefrontal cortex as a result of differences in ‘Neuro-response plasticity’. The paper concludes that by using MEDIAT to reverse dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity caused by traumatic experience can lead to increased constructive participation in online and other environments.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online. In: 13th International Conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BIOCOMP’12), 16-19 July 2012, USA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/taming-the-chatroom-bob-the-role-of-brain-computer-interfaces-that-manipulate-prefrontal-cortex-optimization-for-increasing-participation-of-victims-of-traumatic-sex-and-other-abuse-online.pdf

Circle of Friends

The Circle of Friends is the original name of the social networking method of allowing users to choose who they want to be friends with on online communities.

It was first publicly trialled on a Website called ‘A Guide to Robin Hood and Northern England’, before being fully implemented to a user-friendly standard as early as 2001.

Since its promotion in the media around about 2002, it has been adopted by websites like Friendster, MySpace and most recently Facebook.

Further information

A growing database of information on the Circle of Friends can be found at this link.

Transformations in Online Communities: From Lurker to Poster

Transformations in Online Communities: From Lurker to Poster’. In: Postgraduate interdisciplinary conference on Transformations

Jonathan Bishop

References

Bishop, J. (2011). ‘Transformations in Online Communities: From Lurker to Poster’. In: Postgraduate interdisciplinary conference on Transformations. Cardiff, UK: Cardiff University Press.

Transforming Lurkers into Posters: The role of the Participation Continuum

Transforming Lurkers into Posters: The role of the Participation Continuum

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Increasing participation has long been seen as a way additional to new technology of helping online communities to grow. Online community managers may well advertise their website on other service platforms, but with up 90% of the visitors to their site being non-participants, referred to as lurkers, they could do no better than improving their website to tackle lurker fears. This paper presents the ‘participation continuum’ for understanding why some users are posters, and do participate, and why others are lurkers, and do not contribute. The paper considers lurkers as victims of the failures of those manage online communities to encourage involvement from them by combating the fears they have. The main fears of lurkers are explored and solutions for overcoming them explained and a study is presented using the participation continuum, which confirms the hypothesis of lurkers being similar to those with social phobia.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2011). Transforming Lurkers into Posters: The role of the Participation Continuum. In: In: V. Grout, R. Picking & D. Oram (Eds.) Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Internet Technologies and Applications (ITA11), 6 September 2011, Wrexham, UK: University of Wales Press. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/transforming-lurkers-into-posters-the-role-of-the-participation-continuum.pdf