Tag Archives: Online Communities

Special Issue: Call for Papers on Pseudonymity

Call for Papers: Special Issue on Pseudonymity

Submission Due Date

15 December 2016

Guest Editor

  • Jonathan Bishop
    • Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, Swansea, Wales.

Journal

The International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation

Introduction

Pseudonymity- a state of disguised identity. On one side of the debate are the world’s largest social network sites, including Facebook and Google+, with both services demanding that people use their real names and advocating the the push towards a “real name” Internet. On the other side of the debate are scholars such as sites such as 4chan and Reddit that view anonymity and pseudonymity as important to how people construct identity online. While much has been written about the benefits of anonymity and pseudonymity, there is a lack of published research examining specific practices enabled by pseudonyms.

Objective

The objective of the proposed Special Issue is to highlight the specific issues and challenges around pseudonymity. Research contributions in this special issue will provide insights about the nature of pseudonymity in relation to technology. The contents in this special issue are of interest for researchers working in the domains of Internet security, online communities, e-participation, cyberculture, e-politics, e-society, sociology, cybercultures and multimedia studies, and cognitive science.

Recommended Topics

The journal welcomes articles, dialogues, notes, book reviews and further comments thereon, in keeping with editorial policy, and areas of interest for this special issue include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Participation inequality; lurking, the free-rider problem
  • Free speech; cyberbantering, cybertrickery, online activism
  • Online harassment; cyberstalking, cyberbulling, porn e-vengers
  • Online deception; grooming, cyberhickery, chatroom bobs
  • Online Community moderation, perspectives on ‘don’t feed the troll’, blocking users (i.e. ban-hammering’)
  • History of new media, Anonymous, the WELL, hacktivism

Submission Procedure

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit papers for this special theme issue on Hypermedia Seduction and Persuasion. All submitted papers will be reviewed on a peer review basis. Papers must follow APA style for reference citations.

NB. Papers can be submitted any time before the deadline, as reviewing will take place throughout the period of the advertising of this call for papers. Successful papers for the special issue will be give a letter of approval so the authors can put their publication on their CVs.

Important Dates

  • Submission Deadline: 15 December 2016
  • Reviews to Authors by: 15 February 2017
  • Final Submissions: 15 March 2017
  • Publication: 30 April 2017

All submissions and inquiries should be directed to the attention of:

Jonathan Bishop FRSA
E-mail: jonathan.bishop@crocels.ac.uk
Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, European Parliament, Brussels, BE.

All’s WELL that Ends WELL: A Comparative Analysis of the Constitutional and Administrative Frameworks of Cyberspace and the United Kingdom

All’s WELL that Ends WELL: A Comparative Analysis of the Constitutional and Administrative Frameworks of Cyberspace and the United Kingdom

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Constitutional and Administrative Law is a core component of legal studies throughout the world, but to date little has been written about how this might exist on the Internet, which is like a world without frontiers. John Perry Barlow’s “Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace” served to start the debate about the legitimacy of nation-states to impose laws on such a virtual space. It has been argued that the nation-states won as there are now a significant number of laws regulating the Internet on national and international levels. It can however be seen that there are commonalities between the two entities. For example, there are commonalities in the way they function. There are also commonalities in the way civil rights exist, and the existence of civil remedies and law enforcement. These are all explored in the chapter, which also presents two concepts about the authority of the state in regulating behaviour in online communities. One of them, “sysop prerogative,” says that owners of website can do whatever they want so long as they have not had it taken away by law or given it away by contract. The second, ‘The Preece Gap’, says that there is a distance between the ideal usable and sociable website that the users want and that which the owners of the website provide in practice. Two other concepts are also introduced, “the Figallo effect” and the “Jimbo effect.” The former describes an online community where users use their actual identities and sysop prerogative is delegated to them. The latter describes those where sysop prerogative is exercised by one or more enforcers to control users who use pseudonyms. The chapter concludes that less anonymity and a more professionalised society are needed to bridge the gap between online and offline regulation of behavior.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2011). All’s WELL that Ends WELL: A Comparative Analysis of the Constitutional and Administrative Frameworks of Cyberspace and the United Kingdom. In: Alfreda Dudley, James Braman and Giovanni Vincenti (Eds.) Investigating Cyber Law and Cyber Ethics: Issues, Impacts and Practices. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. (Pages 254-263) Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/alls-well-that-ends-well-a-comparative-analysis-of-the-constiturional-and-administrative-frameworks-of-cyberspace-and-the-united-kingdom.pdf

Mum’s the WordPress: A Comparative Analysis of Political and Mommy Bloggers

Mum’s the WordPress: A Comparative Analysis of Political and Mommy Bloggers

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This research paper presents findings into the differences between two types of popular bloggers: the political blogger and the mommy blogger. These terms are recent entries to the lexicon of online communities, but are soon becoming distinct concepts. This paper shows that mommy bloggers rarely discuss the issues mainly associated with political bloggers, although the reverse is not always true. While political bloggers talk about family issues, this often has little to do with calling for their rights, but echoing sentiments relating to the family life of political public figures.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2011). Mum’s the WordPress: A Comparative Analysis of Political and Mommy Bloggers. In Hamid R. Arabnia; Victor A. Clincy & Ashu M. G. Solo (Eds.) Proceedings of The 2011 Internet Conference on Internet Computing (ICOMP’2011). July 18-21, 2011. Las Vegas Nevada, USA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/mums-the-wordpress-a-comparative-analysis-of-political-and-mommy-bloggers.pdf

Enhancing the understanding of genres of web-based communities: the role of the ecological cognition framework

Enhancing the understanding of genres of web-based communities: The role of the ecological cognition framework

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Web-based communities have been an interest of social science researchers since the dawn of the millennium. To date, much research into them has focused on the methods to enhance community building and understand those who do not participate in community life, known as lurkers. This paper explores web-based communities as a type of media, classifying types of web-based community such as message boards, chat groups and weblogs as genres. A methodology is proposed based on the Ecological Cognition Framework (ECF) for reading these web-based communities in order to determine their genre and subgenre. Utilising both quantitative and qualitative methods to assess the images, text and other artefacts in these web-based communities, two specific sub-genres of the weblogs and directories genre emerge as the political blog and the mommy blog and these are compared with the significant differences that are found between them that make them solid subgenres.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2009). Enhancing the understanding of genres of web-based communities: The role of the ecological cognition framework. International Journal of Web-Based Communities, 5(1), 4-17. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/enhancing-the-understanding-of-genres-of-web-based-communities-the-role-of-the-ecological-cognition-framework.pdf

Increasing membership in online communities: The five principles of managing virtual club economies

Increasing membership in online communities: The five principles of managing virtual club economies

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

It has been argued that the consumption of club goods, where access to them is excludable and non-rivalrous, requires optimal exclusion as well as inclusion. Increasing membership appears to be a particular concern for providers of online communities and in addition increasing the participation of the membership also seems to be important. This paper defines online communities as virtual club economies, as they often exist to allow their members to share club goods. The paper explores various social networking services, finding that those with the highest number of subscriptions follow the guidelines proposed in an influential book on online communities and proposes five principles of managing these virtual club economies. These require as part of a strategy for providers to know their technology, know their subject matter, know their stratum of the wider virtual economy, know their policies and know their purpose. Each of these principles is elaborated on and the paper concludes that the ultimate purpose of a virtual club economy is to maximise the availability of its club goods, such as content to meet its inward goals of sustaining its existence and providing for its membership and wider objectives that suggest a purpose to outsiders and give insiders the motivation to remain as members.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2009). Increasing membership in online communities: The five principles of managing virtual club economies. Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Internet Technologies and Applications – ITA09. Wrexham: University of Wales Press. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-membership-in-online-communities-the-five-principles-of-virtual-club-economies.pdf

Understanding and facilitating the development of social networks in online dating communities: A Case Study and Model

Understanding and facilitating the development of social networks in online dating communities: A Case Study and Model

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Online dating is a big business, allowing people from the comfort of their own home to view and read about potential mates all around the world. Different dating sites offer different services. However, it is not yet commonplace for websites dedicated to dating to use the social networking tools used by popular online communities, such as those that use the personal homepage and message board genres. The Ecological Cognition Framework (ECF) provides a theoretical model regarding online dating communities’ behavior and relationship development. A model based on the ECF is proposed and provides a basis for developing online dating services that effectively support relationship development. Two investigations are presented in this chapter, one that uses a case study approach to identify and describe online dating services from the perspective of a specific case and another that assess the effectiveness of existing online dating services based on the guidelines developed from the case study. The case study provides a useful insight into the nature of social networking from the perspective of a specific case, which led to guidelines for developing e-dating systems that when evaluated showed that the most popular social networking services also score well against the criteria proposed in those guidelines.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2008). Understanding and facilitating the development of social networks in online dating communities: A Case Study and Model. In: C. Romm-Livermore & K. Setzekorn (eds.). Social Networking Communities and EDating Services: Concepts and Implications. IGI Global: New York. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/understanding-and-facilitating-the-development-of-social-networks-in-online-dating-communities-a-case-study-and-model.pdf

Paradise lost? Primary Empathy in Online Communities of Interest and Ways of Use

Paradise lost? Primary Empathy in Online Communities of Interest and Ways of Use

Niki Lambropoulos

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to investigate the role of empathy related to the matching of the feelings of the other person in online communities of interest, connected to contribution, self-organized learning by observation in social contexts, group building, social relationships, as well as the use in HCI. In addition, active empathic groups are suggested to have revolutionary effect for eDemocracy. We are presenting results from two studies, related to the process of non-contributors’ engagement and ways members could interfere in policies and changes of their environment with the help of software-based research.

Full Text

Paradise lost? Primary Empathy in Online Communities of Interest and Ways of Use by Jonathan Bishop

Reference

Lambropoulos, N. (2005). Paradise lost? Primary Empathy in Online Communities of Interest and Ways of Use. In the Proceedings of the 1st Conference on Online Communities and Social Computing, in the 11th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2005, 22-27 July, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA. Published by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

Development and Evaluation of a Virtual Community

Development and Evaluation of a Virtual Community

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The Llantrisant Town Trust wishes to provide an online service to a number of user groups within the Llantrisant community. The Trust would first of all like to investigate the effectiveness of virtual communities as well the types of services they could provide and how their target groups interact with these services.The main aims of the project are to assess the uses of virtual communities and resources associated with them and then to develop and evaluate a web application for the Llantrisant Town Trust that has the functionality they require and supports sociability.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2002). Development and Evaluation of a Virtual Community. Submitted in part fulfillment of the BSc(Hons) in Multimedia Studies. Pontypridd, UK: University of Glamorgan.

Factors shaping the form of and participation in online communities

Factors shaping the form of and participation in online communities

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This article discusses the structure of virtual communities and why people participate in them. It investigates the reasons why people participate in these virtual environments and what shape they may take in the future.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2003). Factors shaping the form of and participation in online communities. Digital Matrix, 85(2003), 22-24