Tag Archives: Jonathan Bishop

The role of affective computing for ensuring safety in at-risk educational environments: The development of ‘VoisJet’ and ‘VoisEye’ for forensic phonetical analysis

The role of affective computing for ensuring safety in at-risk educational environments: The development of ‘VoisJet’ and ‘VoisEye’ for forensic phonetical analysis

Jonathan Bishop and Darren Bellenger

Abtract

This paper presents an introduction to the use of affective computing in at-risk educational environments, such as those that schools located in areas where there is armed conflict and for the safeguarding of children and at-risk adults more generally. This paper has discussed the improvement of the EigenFace based facial emotion recognition by continually streamlining the facial dataset used and its application in at-risk educational environments. One of these mimics the authors’ EigenFaces library and appears to have better performance in poor lighting and poor camera situations, making it possibly better for drone use. It is therefore paramount that as the authors develop the system further that they keep each component separate, in case it is decided to utilise commercial libraries (e.g. Microsoft Project Oxford) for certain aspects. A structure such as VoisOver that allows for third party technologies to be plugged in would mean the authors’ code can remain separate from that of third party plug-ins, namely specific algorithms for identifying the core 12 emotion sets the authors have devised in contexts that might not even have been considered yet. Such algorithms could work with the system described in this paper to make its operation in at-risk educational environments even more possible.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop and Darren Bellenger (2016). The role of affective computing for ensuring safety in at-risk educational environments: The development of ‘VoisJet’ and ‘VoisEye’ for forensic phonetical analysis. The 2016 International Conference on Computational Science and Computational Intelligence (CSCI’2016). 15-17 December 2016, Las Vegas, NV. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/affective-computing-for-ensuring-safety-in-at-risk-educational-environments.pdf

The Need for Separating University Management and Administration from Service Delivery: Reviewing Disability Policy at Four HEIs in Wales

The Need for Separating University Management and Administration from Service Delivery: Reviewing Disability Policy at Four HEIs in Wales

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter looks at how suitable the current equality policies of Wales’s universities are to compete in the current economic climate and the changes needed to deliver best value to people with disabilities and all other taxpayers. The chapter makes the finding that universities are too bloated, by carrying out functions, which in Wales could be better handled by the public sector that is under direct control of the Welsh Government’s education minister. This would involve learning from how the telecoms and energy companies work UK wide, so that HEFCfW becomes an infrastructure provider, Estyn would become responsible for ensuring the equality of access to higher education and ensuring the standards of university education. Universities would thus consist mainly of teaching and research staff, optimising how they use the infrastructure to attract the most students to their degrees, which are homogenised. The chapter makes clear, however, that whilst this policy would likely work in Wales, it would be unlikely to in England, perhaps allowing “clear red water” between governments.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2016). The Need for Separating University Management and Administration from Service Delivery: Reviewing Disability Policy at Four HEIs in Wales. In: Nwachukwu Prince Ololube (Ed.) Handbook of Research on Organizational Justice and Culture in Higher Education Institutions. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. (pages 365-382). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/reviewing-disability-policy-at-four-hei-in-wales.pdf

Editorial for the Special Issue on Sex and Equality

Editorial for the Special Issue on Sex and Equality

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This special issue on Sex and Equality brings together a number of papers looking at how sex and gender interact with equality in the digital age.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Editorial for the Special Issue on Sex and Equality. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 2(1), 1-4. Available at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/editorial-for-the-special-issue-on-sex-and-equality.pdf

Review: Bromley’s Family Law by Nigel Lowe and Gillian Douglas

Review: Bromley’s Family Law by Nigel Lowe and Gillian Douglas

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Bromley’s Family Law is a long established core text for students of family law, and this 2015 edition was an attempt to update it. In terms of contemporary issues like Internet trolling and digital addiction, the authors of the book, Nigel Lowe and Gillian Douglas, fail to capture any of the implications contemporary technologies and cultures have had on family law. The absence of discussion of social media, particularly how Crown Prosecution Service guidance relating to it can impact on the enforcement of court orders and the treatment of children and those lacking maturity, is concerning. If one takes a traditional approach to family law this might be a worthwhile textbook, but on any programme looking for how technology has impacted on family law, it is not suitable for the age we are in.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Review: Bromley’s Family Law by Nigel Lowe and Gillian Douglas. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 2(1), pp.47-51. Available at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/bromleys-family-law-by-nigel-lowe-and-gillian-douglas.pdf

The persuasive properties of representing gender and blame in online news reporting of Internet trolling: A case study of Liam Stacey, Fabrice Muamba, Peter Nunn and Stella Creasy

The persuasive properties of representing gender and blame in online news reporting of Internet trolling: A case study of Liam Stacey, Fabrice Muamba, Peter Nunn and Stella Creasy

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This paper presents a study into two news articles on Internet trolling – one sourced from already communicated media and one generated by the author. The articles were evaluated by interviewing someone who regularly reads online news content. It was found that intended messages in news articles can often be picked up by those reading it, but it does not automatically mean those messages will be accepted by them.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). The persuasive properties of representing gender and blame in online news reporting of Internet trolling: A case study of Liam Stacey, Fabrice Muamba, Peter Nunn and Stella Creasy. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 2(1), 27-37. Available online: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-persuasive-properties-of-representing-gender-and-blame-in-online-news-reporting-of-internet-trolling.pdf

Editorial for the Special Issue on Anonymous

Editorial for the Special Issue on Anonymous

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This special issue on Anonymous brings together and important collection of papers on the topic. To date, much information on the Anonymous movement has been retrievable only through secondary sources, like Wikipedia and newsprint. Whilst in some cases the authors have needed to refer to these, this special issue is one of the first authoritative accounts of works on Anonymous, focussing mainly on original empirical investigation into original sources such as Encyclopedia Dramatica and the synthesising of established literature.

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Citation

  • Jonathan Bishop (2014). Editorial for the Special Issue on Anonymous. The International Journal of Trolling and Online Participation 1(2), pp.3-4.

Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational and Psychological Issues

Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational and Psychological Issues

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

With the popularity and ease-of-access to internet technologies, especially social networking, a number of human-centered issues has developed including internet addiction and cyber bullying. In an effort to encourage positive behavior, it is believed that applying gaming principles to non-gaming environments through gamification can assist in improving human interaction online.

Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational, and Psychological Issues presents information and best practices for promoting positive behavior online through gamification applications in social, educational, and psychological contexts. Through up-to-date research and practical applications, educators, academicians, information technology professionals, and psychologists will gain valuable insight into human-internet interaction and a possible solution for improving the relationship between society and technology.

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational, and Psychological Issues. IGI Global, Hershey, PA.

My Click is My Bond: The Role of Contracts, Social Proof, and Gamification for Sysops to Reduce Pseudo-Activism and Internet Trolling

My Click is My Bond: The Role of Contracts, Social Proof, and Gamification for Sysops to Reduce Pseudo-Activism and Internet Trolling

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The growth in Internet use is not only placing pressure on service providers to maintain adequate bandwidth but also the people who run the Websites that operate through them. Called systems operators, or sysops, these people face a number of different obligations arising out of the use of their computermediated communication platforms. Most notable are contracts, which nearly all Websites have, and in the case of e-commerce sites in the European Union, there are contractual terms they must have. This chapter sets out to investigate how the role contract law can both help and hinder sysops and their users. Sysop powers are limited by sysop prerogative, which is everything they can do which has not been taken away by statute or given away by contract. The chapter finds that there are a number of special considerations for sysops in how they use contracts in order that they are not open to obligations through disabled or vulnerable users being abused by others.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). My Click is My Bond: The Role of Contracts, Social Proof, and Gamification for Sysops to Reduce Pseudo-Activism and Internet Trolling. In: Jonathan Bishop (Ed.) Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational and Psychological Issues. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/my-click-is-my-bond-contracts-social-proof-gamificaiton.pdf

Representations of ‘trolls’ in mass media communication: a review of media-texts and moral panics relating to ‘internet trolling’

Representations of ‘trolls’ in mass media communication: a review of media-texts and moral panics relating to ‘internet trolling’

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

There is a general trend amongst mass media organisations around the world towards concentration of the visual, written and audio packaging and of newspapers, websites and television as channels of information. These platforms are explored in detail in this paper in relation to the moral panics around ‘internet trolling’. This paper discusses the history of trolling in the context of mass media, specifically ‘classical trolling’ and ‘Anonymous trolling’. A review of different media headlines finds that whether or not a story is portrayed in newspapers, online, or on television, the media will use a variety of ways to convey their messages. In the case of ‘trolls’, they show a darker, sinister and transgressive side of cyberspace in the form of abuse and vitriol (i.e., Anonymous trolling). The paper concludes that future research should look in detail at the different character types of internet troller and how these affect the way so called ‘trolls’ are represented in the media and the effect this has on the attitude towards young internet users and trollers in general.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Representations of ‘trolls’ in mass media communication: A review of media-texts and moral panics relating to ‘internet trolling.’ International Journal of Web Based Communities 10(1), 7-24. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/representaitons-of-trolls-in-mass-media-communication.pdf

Using the Internet to make local music more available to the South Wales community

Using the Internet to make local music more available to the South Wales community

Jonathan Bishop and Lisa Mannay

Abstract

Wales is the “land of the poets so soothing to me,” according to its national anthem. The political and economic landscape does not on the whole provide for the many creative people that are in Welsh communities. Social media websites like MySpace and YouTube as well as websites like MTV.com, eJay and PeopleSound whilst providing space for artists to share their works, but do not usually consider the needs of local markets, such as in relation to Welsh language provision through to acknowledgement of Welsh place names and Wales’s status as a country. The study finds that there are distinct issues in relation to presenting information via the Web or Tablet based devises and suggests some of the considerations needing when designing.

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References

Jonathan Bishop & Lisa Mannay (2014). Using the Internet to make local music more available to the South Wales community. In: J. Bishop (Ed). Transforming Politics and Policy in the Digital Age. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/using-the-internet-to-make-local-music-more-available-to-the-south-wales-community.pdf