Tag Archives: Internet Trolling

Trolling for the Lulz?: Using Media Theory to Understand Transgressive Humour and Other Internet Trolling in Online Communities

Trolling for the Lulz?: Using Media Theory to Understand Transgressive Humour and Other Internet Trolling in Online Communities

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Internet trolling as a term has changed in meaning since it first entered mainstream use on the Internet in the 1990s. In the 2010s, it has come to refer to the posting of provocative or offensive messages on the Internet to harm others. This change in usage of the term opens up new challenges for understanding the phenomenon, especially as some are still resistant to taking it beyond its original meaning. This chapter tries to distinguish the 1990s kind from the 2010s kind by referring to the former as classical trolling and the latter as anonymous trolling. Taking part in the former is considered to be “trolling for the Lolz” (i.e. positive) and the second to mean “trolling for the Lulz” (i.e. negative). Through using document and genre analysis, this chapter finds that there are common ways in which anonymous trolling manifests differently on different platforms. The chapter concludes by presenting a model for understanding which genres of online community are at risk for particular types of trolling.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Trolling for the Lulz?: Using Media Theory to Understand Transgressive Humour and Other Internet Trolling in Online Communities. In: Jonathan Bishop (Ed.) Transforming Politics and Policy in the Digital Age. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. (pages 155-172). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/trolling-for-the-lulz-using-media-theory-to-understand-transgressive-humour-and-other-internet-trolling-in-online-communities.pdf

Determining the Risk of Digital Addiction to Adolescent Targets of Internet Trolling: Implications for the UK Legal System

Determining the Risk of Digital Addiction to Adolescent Targets of Internet Trolling: Implications for the UK Legal System

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Research on digital addiction has been increasing significantly since the start of the 2010s. What is not currently available is a measurement scale to assess the extent to which adolescents are at risk of abuse on the Internet that might lead them to develop digital addiction. This chapter sets out to develop a check-list that can be used to risk assess those youths who might be at risk of digital addiction. Through using data from a study into 1,828 young people aged 9-16, the study devised a 6-point check-list based on using a t-test to determine those at high risk and those at low risk. The check-list can be seen as a reliable way for screening those adolescents for whom concerns are raised over their online activities. The chapter concludes that further research will be needed to test the scale with people in older age ranges.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Determining the Risk of Digital Addiction to Adolescent Targets of Internet Trolling: Implications for the UK Legal System. In J. Bishop (Ed.), Psychological and Social Implications Surrounding Internet and Gaming Addiction (pp. 31-42). IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/determining-the-risk-of-digital-addiction-to-adolescent-targets-of-internet-trolling.pdf

The death of Jill Meagher: Crime and punishment on social media

The death of Jill Meagher: Crime and punishment on social media

Sanja Milivojevic & Alyce McGovern

Abstract

In this paper we analyse the kidnapping, rape and murder of Jill Meagher to highlight a range of issues that emerge in relation to criminalisation, crime prevention and policing strategies on social media, issues that, in our opinion, require immediate and thorough theoretical engagement. An in‐depth analysis of Jill Meagher’s case and its newsworthiness in traditional media is a challenging task that is beyond the scope of this paper. Rather, the focus for this particular paper is on the process of agenda‐building, particularly via social media, the impact of the social environment, and the capacity of ‘ordinary’ citizens to influence the agenda‐defining process. In addition, we analyse the depth of the target audience on social media, the threat of a ‘trial by social media’, and the place of social media in the context of pre‐crime and surveillance debates. Finally, we call for more audacious and critical engagement by criminologists and social scientists in addressing the challenges posed by new technologies.

Citation

Sanja Milivojevic & Alyce McGovern (2014). The death of Jill Meagher: Crime and punishment on social media. International journal for crime, justice and social democracy, 3(3), 22-39. Available at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-death-of-jill-meagher-crime-and-punishment.pdf

Digital Teens and the ‘Antisocial Network’: Prevalence of Troublesome Online Youth Groups and Internet trolling in Great Britain

Digital Teens and the ‘Antisocial Network’: Prevalence of Troublesome Online Youth Groups and Internet trolling in Great Britain

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

A concern shared among nearly all generations of adults is that they must do something to tackle the problems in society caused by young people. They often forget that they were once young, and all too often blame young people for all of problems in their community. This paper challenges this view and shows how the blaming of Internet trolling on today’s young people – called digital teens – is probably inaccurate. What might otherwise be called Troublesome Online Youth Groups (TOYGs), this paper looks at data collected from subjects in three UK regions (n=150 to 161), which includes young people who are not in education, employment or training (NEETs). Unlike might be typically thought, the data shows that far from these NEETs being the causes of Internet trolling it is in fact the areas with high levels of productivity, higher education and higher intelligence that report lower perceptions of quality of life that these electronic message faults (EMFts) most occur in.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Digital Teens and the ‘Antisocial Network’: Prevalence of Troublesome Online Youth Groups and Internet trolling in Great Britain. International Journal of E-Politics 5(3), pp.1-15. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/digital-teens-and-the-antisocial-network.pdf

Guest Editorial Preface for the Special Issue on Internet Trolling

Guest Editorial Preface for the Special Issue on Internet Trolling

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

It is a pleasure to present this special issue of the International Journal of E-Politics on Internet Trolling. There is a strong selection of papers in this issue by Nikolaos Koumartzis & Andreas
Veglis, Joanna Kulesza, Shefali Virkar and me, Jonathan Bishop. What is striking about the selection of papers in this special issue is their scope and applicability to many aspects of the emerging agenda around Internet trolling evident in the mass media.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Guest Editorial Preface. International Journal of E-Politics 5(4), iv-v. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/guest-editorial-preface-special-issue-on-internet-trolling-ijep.pdf

The Impact of the Internet on Transnational Civil Society Networks: The Anonymous Movement Unmasked

The Impact of the Internet on Transnational Civil Society Networks: The Anonymous Movement Unmasked

Shefali Virkar

Abstract

The rise in the number of non-state actors, particularly the emergence of civil society bodies such as NGOs, and the increase of their political influence has thrown up significant questions about how best the Internet and its associated technologies may be harnessed to aid the activities of such organisations. Can the Internet truly augment the effects of those activists, hacktivists, and cyberprotestors seeking to alter the landscape of international relations and political advocacy? This article attempts to answer this question through an examination of the possibly the most iconic, cutting-edge transnational civil society network of the 21st Century: The Anonymous Movement, and the manner in which the collective’s participants and constituent elements have successfully harnessed and have in turn been impacted by the Internet and its associated digital platforms and technologies. The research dealt with herein aims to showcase the various intersecting circumstances that help advance Anonymous’ contemporary geopolitical power, and in doing so, to contribute to that body of empirical political science which recognises the impact and significance of Information and Communication Technologies and their associated digital platforms on transnational protest and advocacy ever since their development and rapid global proliferation in the mid-1990s.

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Citation

Shefali Virkar (2014). The Impact of the Internet on Transnational Civil Society Networks: The Anonymous Movement Unmasked. The International Journal of Trolling and Online Participation 1(2), pp.69-108.

An Hero and the Trolls

An Hero and the Trolls

Lars Konzack

Abstract

This is an investigation into the case of Mitchell Henderson seen in the light of heroes and villains. The MySpace page commemorating Hendersons suicide was subject to a form of activity known as “trolling”, of such intensity that Henderson became an iconic figure, a “meme” in the troll community known as “Anonymous.” Examination of this singular event leads eventually to a wider discussion of what it means to be a hero and whether or not Anonymous should be considered villains, heroes, tricksters or vigilantes. Furthermore, it attempts an understanding of what Anonymous are, how they operate, and insight into their distinctive Internet culture.

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Citation

  • Lars Konzack (2014). An Hero and the Trolls. The International Journal of Trolling and Online Participation 1 (2), pp.5-28.

My Click is My Bond: The Role of Contracts, Social Proof, and Gamification for Sysops to Reduce Pseudo-Activism and Internet Trolling

My Click is My Bond: The Role of Contracts, Social Proof, and Gamification for Sysops to Reduce Pseudo-Activism and Internet Trolling

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The growth in Internet use is not only placing pressure on service providers to maintain adequate bandwidth but also the people who run the Websites that operate through them. Called systems operators, or sysops, these people face a number of different obligations arising out of the use of their computermediated communication platforms. Most notable are contracts, which nearly all Websites have, and in the case of e-commerce sites in the European Union, there are contractual terms they must have. This chapter sets out to investigate how the role contract law can both help and hinder sysops and their users. Sysop powers are limited by sysop prerogative, which is everything they can do which has not been taken away by statute or given away by contract. The chapter finds that there are a number of special considerations for sysops in how they use contracts in order that they are not open to obligations through disabled or vulnerable users being abused by others.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). My Click is My Bond: The Role of Contracts, Social Proof, and Gamification for Sysops to Reduce Pseudo-Activism and Internet Trolling. In: Jonathan Bishop (Ed.) Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational and Psychological Issues. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/my-click-is-my-bond-contracts-social-proof-gamificaiton.pdf

The Art of Trolling Law Enforcement: A Review and Model for implementing ‘flame trolling’ legislation enacted in Great Britain (1981-2012)

The Art of Trolling Law Enforcement: A Review and Model for implementing ‘flame trolling’ legislation enacted in Great Britain (1981-2012)

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

While trolling has existed as a term since the 1990s and as a reality even earlier there has been an exponential increase in the prevalence of the abusive kind – ‘flame trolling’. Mistakenly the media calls these flame trollers, ‘trolls’, when in fact there are more often than not ‘Snerts’ and ‘E-Vengers’. The justice system in Great Britain has taken a sporadic approach to dealing with flame trolling, and the wide range of legislation that has existed since the 1980s has no strategic method to assign its usage on the basis of the nature of the flame trolling as its use often depends on the whim of different police forces. This paper hopes to change this. After a brief presentation of the background of Internet trolling in Great Britain and in general a new framework is presented. This allows prosecutors to easily classify flame trolling based on the facts of the case and pick the appropriate level based on the severity.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2013). The Art of Trolling Law Enforcement: A Review and Model for implementing ‘flame trolling’ legislation enacted in Great Britain (1981-2012), International Review of Law, Computers and Technology 27(3), 301-318. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-art-of-trolling-law-enforcement-a-review-and-model-for-implementing-flame-trolling-legislation-enacted-in-great-britain-1981-2012.pdf

The effect of deindividuation of the Internet Troller on Criminal Procedure implementation: An interview with a Hater

The effect of deindividuation of the Internet Troller on Criminal Procedure implementation: An interview with a Hater

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Trolling has been one of the most talked about issue in relation to the internet in the second decade of the 21st century to date. Many people have spoken out against those who use the Internet to abuse others. It is clear that on their own, laws are not going to solve the problem of Internet abuse and data misuse, as being tough on crime needs to be matched with being tough on the causes of crime. This paper provides an in depth interview with an Internet troller and discussion of the findings of this to provide a general framework for understanding these ‘electronic message faults.’ The interview with the troller makes it apparent that there are a number of similarities between the proposed anti-social personality disorder in DSM-V and flame trolling activities. An investigation into the application of the Criminal Procedure rules in United Kingdom finds a number of inconsistencies in the way the rules are followed, which it appears are causing injustices in the application of Internet trolling laws.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2013). The effect of deindividuation of the Internet Troller on Criminal Procedure implementation: An interview with a Hater. International Journal of Cyber Criminology 7(1), pp. 28-48. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-effect-of-de-inviduation-of-the-internet-troller-on-criminal-procedure-implementation.pdf