Tag Archives: History of Social Relationships

Sex and age biases in Tweets relating to the 2015 migration crisis

Sex and age biases in Tweets relating to the 2015 migration crisis

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The 2015 migration crisis arose out of the interference of Western government in the affairs of countries affected by the Arab Spring Uprisings. Attitudes towards immigration can be very strong, with even UK Prime Minister David Cameron describing the increased asylum applications as a result of his failed foreign policies a “swarm.” This talk looks at how attitudes towards immigration have been expressed on Twitter and the extent to which sex and age biases shape or otherwise the moral compass of those in the Twittersphere.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Sex and age biases in Tweets relating to the 2015 migration crisis. Diaspora Beyond Nationalism Conference. 16 September 2015. Cardiff University, Cardiff, GB.

Participation Transformation in Online Communities: From Lurker to Poster

Participation Transformation in Online Communities: From Lurker to Poster

Jonathan Bishop

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop. Participation Transformation in Online Communities: From Lurker to Poster. Transformations Conference. Cardiff University.

The Misrepresentation of Digital Teens as Trolls: Considering Political, News and Feminist Agendas

The Misrepresentation of Digital Teens as Trolls: Considering Political, News and Feminist Agendas

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

If one pays attention to popular culture and the mass media, Internet trolls are unemployed young men in their 20s at home in their parents’ basement spending their time posting abusive messages online. This study finds that this stereotype, whilst common in the mass media, is not representative of the empirical data collected. The research found that most trolling on blogs and defriending is done by women and because of other women. It finds that the people who troll are unlikely to be youths not in education, employment or training (NEETs), but more likely to be those in wealthy areas who are bored. It equally finds that those who troll, or indeed troll-call, are likely to show the symptoms of antisocial personality disorder and histrionic personality disorder respectively. With the media focussing on represent young people as trolls, the research finds that the existence of benevolent sexism in the police perpetuates this myth, meaning women are getting more favourably treatment, either as trolls or troll-callers. In fact the research finds trolls are as likely to be men or women, and they will change the way they troll based on their target, meaning feminists deemed misandrist will face sexist posts including from women, but the same trolls, regardless of their sex, would have used racist remarks if the feminists calling for more rights for women were Black and calling for more rights for Black people. The research concludes that deterring trolling requires a community-led approach, where local government can use their law enforcement powers, such as to issue fixed penalty notices or anti-social behaviour orders, against those trolls they can prove took part in trolling by using their surveillance rights.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). The Misrepresentation of Digital Teens as Trolls: Considering Political, News and Feminist Agendas. Invited Speech to the 13th International Conference on E-Society (E-Society 2015), Madeira, Portugal, 14-16 March 2015.

Supporting Communication between People with Social Orientation Impairments Using Affective Computing Technologies: Rethinking the Autism Spectrum

Supporting Communication between People with Social Orientation Impairments Using Affective Computing Technologies: Rethinking the Autism Spectrum

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

A disability is a physical or mental impairment that has an adverse long-term impact on someone’s ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities. This is often thought of in terms of medical conditions with clearly defined symptoms. This chapter, however, argues that it is these symptoms that can be considered to be the impairments and that in the right environment can in fact be advantageous. Someone may be have a medical diagnosis but not be symptomatic due to medication, for instance. In this chapter, a set of symptoms is made up from a number of different scales, called Social-Behavioural Traits (SBTs), which are affected by a person’s Serotonergic-Dopamagenic Asynchronicity (SDA). This chapter discusses the role of affective computing in achieving harmony between people with various personality differences, including a model for explaining how technology can influence SDA and SBTs for the better.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Supporting Communication between People with Social Orientation Impairments Using Affective Computing Technologies: Rethinking the Autism Spectrum. In: Leu Bee Theng (Ed.) Assistive Technologies for Physical and Cognitive Disabilities. IGI Global, Hershey, PA (Pages 42-55). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/supporting-communication-between-people-with-social-orientation-impairments.pdf

Digital Teens and the ‘Antisocial Network’: Prevalence of Troublesome Online Youth Groups and Internet trolling in Great Britain

Digital Teens and the ‘Antisocial Network’: Prevalence of Troublesome Online Youth Groups and Internet trolling in Great Britain

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

A concern shared among nearly all generations of adults is that they must do something to tackle the problems in society caused by young people. They often forget that they were once young, and all too often blame young people for all of problems in their community. This paper challenges this view and shows how the blaming of Internet trolling on today’s young people – called digital teens – is probably inaccurate. What might otherwise be called Troublesome Online Youth Groups (TOYGs), this paper looks at data collected from subjects in three UK regions (n=150 to 161), which includes young people who are not in education, employment or training (NEETs). Unlike might be typically thought, the data shows that far from these NEETs being the causes of Internet trolling it is in fact the areas with high levels of productivity, higher education and higher intelligence that report lower perceptions of quality of life that these electronic message faults (EMFts) most occur in.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Digital Teens and the ‘Antisocial Network’: Prevalence of Troublesome Online Youth Groups and Internet trolling in Great Britain. International Journal of E-Politics 5(3), pp.1-15. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/digital-teens-and-the-antisocial-network.pdf

The pit head baths are now an Internet café: The role of technology in transforming audience, institutions and power structures among women in Wales

The pit head baths are now an Internet café: The role of technology in transforming audience, institutions and power structures among women in Wales

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The coal-fields communities in Wales were once one of the most relatively prosperous places to live in the British Isles. Many people flocked to Wales in search of a new life and opportunities for their family. Coal became known as ‘Black Gold’ and the industrialized coal-fields became centres of productivity. Media use in Welsh households has generally been controlled by dominating men who saw and in many cases still see themselves as the ‘heads of the household.’ Such control over the media consumption of women was not out of place in the UK as a whole, where men have assumed a place as a de facto media institution who force choices of what to watch on their households. This paper presents a longitudinal study of three women in Wales conducted between 2000 and 2013 that shows how the media consumption and audience styles have changed over time so that power structures from both men and traditional media institutions has all but eroded.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2014). The pit head baths are now an Internet café: The role of technology in transforming audience, institutions and power structures among women in Wales. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Transforming Politics and Policy in the Digital Age. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-pit-head-baths-are-now-an-internet-cafe-women-in-wales.pdf

The empathic psychopathy in public life: Towards an understanding of ‘autism’ and ’empathism’; as ‘dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity’

The empathic psychopathy in public life: Towards an understanding of ‘autism’ and ’empathism’ and ‘dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity’

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

So-called ‘autism’ is a generally well understood condition yet it is claimed has no known cure, is best dealt with through “early intervention,” and to many is deserving of pity. This poster shows an aetiology of ‘autism’ and what can be called ’empathism’ as being caused by ‘dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity’ that results in ‘autistic’ functions of the brain and ‘empathic’ ones being used unequally, with one being more predominant than the other. The poster argues that those who overuse the ‘empathic’ parts of the brain suffer from ‘empathism’ which impairs their relationship skills as much as social skills are impaired in people with ‘autism,’ who overuse the ‘autistic’ parts of their brain. The poster concludes by discussing how the researcher’s advancements in affective computing could be used to assist people with the symptoms of obsessive compulsive and narcissistic disorders that result from the mental dependence to an imbalance in serotonin and dopamine activity in the brain. The poster displays two diagrams linking these together, including the relationship between autism and empathism with regards to other so-called personality disorders.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2013). ‘The empathic psychopathy in public life: Towards an understanding of ‘autism’ and ’empathism’ and ‘dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity.‘ Poster presented to the Implications of Research on the Neuroscience of Affect, Attachment, and Social Cognition Conference. 18th May 2013 – 19th May 2013. University College London, London, GB. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-empathic-psychopathy-in-public-life.pdf

The effect of deindividuation of the Internet Troller on Criminal Procedure implementation: An interview with a Hater

The effect of deindividuation of the Internet Troller on Criminal Procedure implementation: An interview with a Hater

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Trolling has been one of the most talked about issue in relation to the internet in the second decade of the 21st century to date. Many people have spoken out against those who use the Internet to abuse others. It is clear that on their own, laws are not going to solve the problem of Internet abuse and data misuse, as being tough on crime needs to be matched with being tough on the causes of crime. This paper provides an in depth interview with an Internet troller and discussion of the findings of this to provide a general framework for understanding these ‘electronic message faults.’ The interview with the troller makes it apparent that there are a number of similarities between the proposed anti-social personality disorder in DSM-V and flame trolling activities. An investigation into the application of the Criminal Procedure rules in United Kingdom finds a number of inconsistencies in the way the rules are followed, which it appears are causing injustices in the application of Internet trolling laws.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2013). The effect of deindividuation of the Internet Troller on Criminal Procedure implementation: An interview with a Hater. International Journal of Cyber Criminology 7(1), pp. 28-48. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-effect-of-de-inviduation-of-the-internet-troller-on-criminal-procedure-implementation.pdf

Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters

Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The rise of online communities in Internet environments has set in motion an unprecedented shift in power from vendors of goods and services to the customers who buy them, with those vendors who understand this transfer of power and choose to capitalize on it by organizing online communities and being richly rewarded with both peerless customer loyalty and impressive economic returns. A type of online community, the virtual world, could radically alter the way people work, learn, grow consume, and entertain. Understanding the exchange of social and economic capital in online communities could involve looking at what causes actors to spend their resources on improving someone else’s reputation. Actors’ reputations may affect others’ willingness to trade with them or give them gifts. Investigating online communities reveals a large number of different characters and associated avatars. When an actor looks at another’s avatar they will evaluate them and make decisions that are crucial to creating interaction between customers and vendors in virtual worlds based on the exchange of goods and services. This paper utilizes the ecological cognition framework to understand transactions, characters and avatars in virtual worlds and investigates the exchange of capital in a bulletin board and virtual. The chapter finds strong evidence for the existence of characters and stereotypes based on the Ecological Cognition Framework and empirical evidence that actors using avatars with antisocial connotations are more likely to have a lower return on investment and be rated less positively than those with more sophisticated appearing avatars.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2013). Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Examining the Concepts, Issues and Implications of Internet Trolling. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-capital-revenue-in-social-networking-communities-building-social-and-economic-relationships-through-avatars-and-characters.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2011). Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters. In: IRMA (Ed.). Virtual Communities: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools and Applications. IGI Global: Hershey, PA; pages 1720-1734. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-capital-revenue-in-social-networking-communities-building-social-and-economic-relationships-through-avatars-and-characters.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2008). Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters. In: C. Romm-Livermore & K. Setzekorn (Eds.). Social Networking Communities and EDating Services: Concepts and Implications. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-capital-revenue-in-social-networking-communities-building-social-and-economic-relationships-through-avatars-and-characters.pdf

The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives

The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The rise of social networking services have furthered the proliferation of online communities, transferring the power of controlling access to content from often one person who operates a system (sysop), which they would normally rely on, to them personally. With increased participation in social networking and services come new problems and issues, such as trolling, where unconstructive messages are posted to incite a reaction, and lurking, where persons refuse to participate. Methods of dealing with these abuses included defriending, which can include blocking strangers. The Gamified Flow of Persuasion model is proposed, building on work in ecological cognition and the participation continuum, the chapter shows how all of these models can collectively be used with gamification principles to increase participation in online communities through effective management of lurking, trolling, and defriending.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2014). The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Education, and Psychological Issues. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-psychology-of-trolling-and-lurking-defriending-gamification.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2013). The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Examining the Concepts, Issues, and Implications of Internet Trolling. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-psychology-of-trolling-and-lurking-defriending-gamification.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2012). The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives. In: H. Li (Ed.) Virtual Community Participation and Motivation: Cross-Disciplinary Theories. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-psychology-of-trolling-and-lurking-defriending-gamification.pdf