Tag Archives: E-Learning Research

The impact of physical and virtual environments on human emotions: A pilot study in an adult and community education setting

The impact of physical and virtual environments on human emotions: A pilot study in an adult and community education setting

Jonathan Bishop and Piet Kommers

Abstract

This paper concerns an experiment that attempts to understand the impact the physical and virtual environment can have on human emotions. To do this four blended learning workshops are held covering different amounts of technology enhanced learning based on the blended learning continuum. In each workshop there are two of the same participants – one who is autistic and one who is empathic – and then other participants are introduced depending on the aesthetics of the workshop. The study finds that learners deemed ‘empathic’ require less brain processing for befriending than people deemed ‘autistic’ do and that those deemed autistic treat every environment the same way and at the same time those deemed ‘empathic’ focus more on befriending others, regardless of the environment they are in.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2016). The impact of physical and virtual environments on human emotions: A pilot study in an adult and community education setting. The 14th International Conference on Scientific Computing. 25-28 July 2016. Las Vegas, NV. Available online: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-impact-of-virtual-and-physical-environments-on-human-emotion.pdf

An investigation into the extent and limitations of the GROW model for coaching and mentoring online: Towards ‘prosthetic learning’

An investigation into the extent and limitations of the GROW model for coaching and mentoring online: Towards ‘prosthetic learning’

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Coaching and mentoring have many commonalities, but can also be seen to be different. The aim of coaching is to help a person transform being where they are to where they want to go, which may be on a path that has not yet been trodden. Mentoring is a one-to-one communication between a mentor who has “been there and done that” and a mentee who wants ‘learn the ropes.’ This paper looks at how these practices can be enabled online – through Virtual Coaches – and the extent and limitations of the GROW model for online coaching and mentoring. It finds that the GROW model is limited in what it can do, and that it needs to be extended to consider factors beyond goals, realities, options and will. It is suggested that ‘engage’ and ‘routinize’ be added to create a new model called ‘GROWER.’ An extension of the M-MARS model making it M-REAMS (i.e. Methods, Rules, Enmities, Amities, Memes, Strategies) is proposed for an ethnomethodological approach to reflective learning. The paper concludes that Virtual Coaches can provide benefits in terms of enhanced mentoring and coaching relationships.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). An investigation into the extent and limitations of the GROW model for coaching and mentoring online: Towards ‘prosthetic learning.’ The 2015 International Conference on e-Learning, e-Business, Enterprise Information Systems, and e-Government (July 27-30, 2015, Las Vegas, USA). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/extent-and-limitations-of-grow-model-for-coaching-and-mentoring-online.pdf

Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives

Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter presents a case study of The Emotivate Project and the role it played in the didactic education of 11 school-age children from the former coalfields communities of Llantwit Fardre and Pontypridd in Wales in the United Kingdom through blended learning (bLearning) and blended twinning (bTwinning). The chapter shows how the Emotivate Projects provides evidence to show that UK Government’s Big Society policy depends, not on additional government intervention beyond finance, but partnerships on the basis of responsible capitalism and community co-operativism, involving all three market sectors – people, private and public. By using the capital and ‘payment in kind’ of responsible capitalist firms, in addition to charitable funding and government grants means partnerships across sectors can provide a significant degree of match funding for Big Society projects. The chapter recommends that the private sector get involved in increasing efficiency in Big Society run on a people sector basis, through taking advantage of outsourcing. This enabled them to fulfil their social or moral causes through didactic activism with better value for money due to efficiency savings in overhead costs.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives. In: P.M. Pumilia-Gnarini, E, Favaron, E. Pacetti, J. Bishop, L, Guerra (Eds.) Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education Incorporating Advancements. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/lessons-from-the-emotivate-project-for-increasing-take-up-of-big-society-and-responsible-capitalism-initiatives.pdf

Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education: Incorporating Advancements

Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education: Incorporating Advancements

P.M. Pumilia-Gnarini, E. Favaronm, E. Pacetti, J. Bishop, L. Gurra

Abstract

Recently there has been a growing wave of local initiatives in support of their public schools. Teachers and communities together have been playing an active role in the innovative efforts towards new educational methods aimed at helping schools. These grass root experiments, though very effective, tend to go unnoticed in the wide scheme of the educational system. However, if the most useful and meaningful of these initiatives could be fostered and developed, they may have the possibility of transforming it.

Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education: Incorporating Advancements aims to be a platform for the most significant educational achievements by teachers, school administrators, and local associations that have worked together in public institutions that range from primary school to the university level. This book aims to be useful for both scholars and the citizens that are involved in improving the educational system.

Publisher Summary

Discussion

This book offers insight into the many things that are possible with technology in education. Case studies in this book relating to Classroom 2.0, for example, show how cross-border education can become a reality. The editors say in the introduction that this book was put together with many papers where English was not the authors’ first language. The editors did a great job it would seem. It was beneficial to hear the differences between strategies in different jurisdictions. I have no doubts about giving five stars to this book. I recommend it to anyone looking to enhance their knowledge and improve their techniques in education.” – Ashu MG Solo

Citation

Pumilia-Gnarini, P.M., Favaronm, E., Pacetti, E., Bishop, J., Gurra, L. (2012). Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education: Incorporating Advancements. Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Cooperative e-learning in the multilingual and multicultural school

Cooperative e-learning in the multilingual and multicultural school: The role of ‘Classroom 2.0’ for increasing participation in education

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The Classroom 2.0 initiative is one of the most fundamental reforms to the way education is performed across the European Union. Starting its life at the Digital Classroom of Tomorrow (DCOT) Project in Wales, the initiative has shown that concepts like electronic individual education programmes (eIEPs) and the electronic twinning of schools (eTwinning) can play an important role in enhancing learning outcomes for school age learners. This chapter presents a review of the impact of the original Classroom 2.0 Project – DCOT – and explores some of the technical issues essential to the project’s success across Europe.

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References

J. Bishop (2012). Cooperative e-learning in the multilingual and multicultural school: The role of ‘Classroom 2.0’ for increasing participation in education. P.M. Pumilia-Gnarini, E, Favaron, E. Pacetti, J. Bishop, L, Guerra (Eds.) Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education Incorporating Advancements. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/cooperative-e-learning-in-the-multilingual-and-multicultural-school-the-role-of-classroom-2-0.pdf

The Persuasive and Assistive Interaction Extension (PAIX): A position paper on using gamified behavior management systems for reducing flame trolling in schools based on Classroom 2.0

The Persuasive and Assistive Interaction Extension (PAIX): A position paper on using gamified behavior management systems for reducing flame trolling in schools based on Classroom 2.0

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Internet trolling that takes the form of cyberbullying is emerging as a significant problem for any administrator of a networked computer environment. This is also the case in Classroom 2.0 classrooms where technologies like the circle of friends has not been implemented or otherwise where there is no current moderation or monitoring of activity of the school students using the system. The paper presents a system called Paix – The Persuasive and Assistive Interaction Extension (Paix) for assisting with this problem.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2012). The Persuasive and Assistive Interaction Extension (PAIX): A position paper on using gamified behavior management systems for reducing flame trolling in schools based on Classroom 2.0. The 13th International Conference on Internet Computing (ICOMP’12). 16-19 July, 2012, USA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-persuasive-and-assistive-interaction-extension-paix-a-position-paper-on-using-gamified-behavior-management-systems-for-reducing-flame-trolling-in-schools-based-on-classroom-2-0.pdf

The role of mediating artifacts in the design of persuasive e-learning systems

The role of mediating artifacts in the design of persuasive e-learning systems

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

E-learning applications are becoming commonplace in the networked classroom, as educators search for new ways of engaging their learners. Traditional methods of designing these systems have focussed the tasks users are likely to complete as opposed to designing them to persuade the user to develop knowledge or learn about topics. Successful e-learning systems allow the user to interact with the environment using mediating artefacts, which are conductors for action within these environments. Mediating artefacts take many forms, in Internet applications they often manifest in the form of text that affords clicking, whereas in graphical environments they are often icons that afford dragging. Many e-learning systems are based around mediating artefacts, but few of these have been designed to encourage learners to carry actions in order to meet their own goals. This paper investigates how mediating artefacts can be made persuasive and suggests a scenario-based design model to aid developers in making e-learning systems persuasive and orientated around the goals of learners.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2005). The role of mediating artifacts in the design of persuasive e-learning systems. In: Proceedings of the First International Conferences on Internet Technologies and Applications, Wrexham: University of Wales Press, pp. 54-62. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-role-of-mediating-artifacts-in-the-design-of-persuasive-e-learning-systems.pdf

Evaluation-Centred Design of E-Learning Communities: A Case Study and Review

Evaluation-Centred Design of E-Learning Communities: A Case Study and Review

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This paper describes a proposal for a evaluation-centred design model based on use of the Star Lifecycle over a number of years in different industries. This paper outlines the five stages of a new star lifecycle, which are based on the various sectors of the e-learning industry, those being Consulting, Content, Technology, Services, and Support. The methods, tools and techniques for carrying out each of the five development stages are evaluated, with examples and practices from the development of systems in three projects, including Llantrisant Online. These practices are reviewed and modern practices, such as the use of scenarios in the design process are highlighted.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2007). Evaluation-Centred Design of E-Learning Communities: A Case Study and Review. In: V. Grout, D. Oram & R. Picking (eds.). Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Internet Technologies and Applications (ITA07 edn.). University of Wales Press: Wrexham, pp. 1-9. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/evaluation-centred-designed-of-e-learning-communities-a-case-study-and-review.pdf

The Role of Multi-Agent Social Networking Systems in Ubiquitous Education: Enhancing Peer-Supported Reflective Learning

The Role of Multi-Agent Social Networking Systems in Ubiquitous Education: Enhancing Peer-Supported Reflective Learning

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Knowledge it could be argued is constructed from the information actors pick up from the environments they are in. Understanding the networks of practice in which these e-learning systems are part of requires a deeper understanding of information science frameworks. The Ecological Cognition Framework (ECF) provides a thorough understanding of how actors respond to and influence their environment. Utilising the ECF, this chapter proposes a multi-agent e-learning system called the Portable Assistant for Intelligently Guided Education (PAIGE), which is based around a 3D anthropomorphic avatar for educating actors ubiquitously. An investigation into the market for PAIGE was carried out. The data showed that those that thought their peers were the best form of support were less likely to spend more of their free time on homework. The chapter suggests that future research could investigate the usage of systems like PAIGE in educational settings and the effect they have on learning outcomes.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2009). The Role of Multi-Agent Social Networking Systems in Ubiquitous Education: Enhancing Peer-Supported Reflective Learning. In: T.T. Goh (Ed.). Multiplatform E-Learning Systems and Technologies: Mobile Devices for Ubiquitous ICT-Based Education. IGI Global: New York, NY (Pages 72-88). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-role-of-multi-agent-social-networking-systems-in-ubiquitous-education-paige-jonathanbishop.pdf

The potential of persuasive technology for educating heterogeneous user groups

The potential of persuasive technology for educating heterogeneous user groups

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The Masters-level thesis presents an overview of the state of play in minority language education in Europe in 2004, and discusses ways in which e-learning systems can be adapted to take account of then emerging generations like the Net Generation, using buddy-lists and extendible and re-usable learning objects, 3 years before Facebook was launched, replacing learning objects with plug-ins.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2004). The potential of persuasive technology for educating heterogeneous user groups. Submission in Part fulfilment of the MSc in E-Learning. Pontypridd, GB: University of Glamorgan. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-potential-of-persuasive-technology-in-educating-heterogeneous-user-groups-jonathanbishop.pdf