Tag Archives: Digital Teens

Determining the Risk of Digital Addiction to Adolescent Targets of Internet Trolling: Implications for the UK Legal System

Determining the Risk of Digital Addiction to Adolescent Targets of Internet Trolling: Implications for the UK Legal System

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Research on digital addiction has been increasing significantly since the start of the 2010s. What is not currently available is a measurement scale to assess the extent to which adolescents are at risk of abuse on the Internet that might lead them to develop digital addiction. This chapter sets out to develop a check-list that can be used to risk assess those youths who might be at risk of digital addiction. Through using data from a study into 1,828 young people aged 9-16, the study devised a 6-point check-list based on using a t-test to determine those at high risk and those at low risk. The check-list can be seen as a reliable way for screening those adolescents for whom concerns are raised over their online activities. The chapter concludes that further research will be needed to test the scale with people in older age ranges.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Determining the Risk of Digital Addiction to Adolescent Targets of Internet Trolling: Implications for the UK Legal System. In J. Bishop (Ed.), Psychological and Social Implications Surrounding Internet and Gaming Addiction (pp. 31-42). IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/determining-the-risk-of-digital-addiction-to-adolescent-targets-of-internet-trolling.pdf

Digital Teens and the ‘Antisocial Network’: Prevalence of Troublesome Online Youth Groups and Internet trolling in Great Britain

Digital Teens and the ‘Antisocial Network’: Prevalence of Troublesome Online Youth Groups and Internet trolling in Great Britain

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

A concern shared among nearly all generations of adults is that they must do something to tackle the problems in society caused by young people. They often forget that they were once young, and all too often blame young people for all of problems in their community. This paper challenges this view and shows how the blaming of Internet trolling on today’s young people – called digital teens – is probably inaccurate. What might otherwise be called Troublesome Online Youth Groups (TOYGs), this paper looks at data collected from subjects in three UK regions (n=150 to 161), which includes young people who are not in education, employment or training (NEETs). Unlike might be typically thought, the data shows that far from these NEETs being the causes of Internet trolling it is in fact the areas with high levels of productivity, higher education and higher intelligence that report lower perceptions of quality of life that these electronic message faults (EMFts) most occur in.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Digital Teens and the ‘Antisocial Network’: Prevalence of Troublesome Online Youth Groups and Internet trolling in Great Britain. International Journal of E-Politics 5(3), pp.1-15. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/digital-teens-and-the-antisocial-network.pdf

We Don’t Do Politics: An Analysis and Discussion of Information Seeking Behaviour Research in Relation to the Net Generation

We Don’t Do Politics: An Analysis and Discussion of Information Seeking Behaviour Research in Relation to the Net Generation

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Information Seeking Behaviour (ISB) is becoming an interesting topic, especially with the advancement of the World Wide Web and technologically enhanced data collection techniques. Differences between generations, such as the Net Generation and Baby Boomers are becoming more and more evident. The Net Generation have shown they are enjoying more public policy participation than ever before through the use of the Internet. Finding an overall methodology that takes into account this generation is therefore a challenge. This chapter applies a heuristic framework to a number of research papers on the Net Generation and ISBs in order to critically analyse and evaluate the information within it in order to gain an insight into the most effective approach to ISB research. Through interpreting these research papers, this chapter attempts to gauge the scope and develop an understanding of ISB research in relation to the Net Generation and discover the most effective methodological approach for the emerging discipline.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2014). We Don’t Do Politics: An Analysis and Discussion of Information Seeking Behaviour Research in Relation to the Net Generation. In J. Bishop (Ed.), Transforming Politics and Policy in the Digital Age (pp. 6-21). IGI Global, Hershey, PA.

Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives

Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter presents a case study of The Emotivate Project and the role it played in the didactic education of 11 school-age children from the former coalfields communities of Llantwit Fardre and Pontypridd in Wales in the United Kingdom through blended learning (bLearning) and blended twinning (bTwinning). The chapter shows how the Emotivate Projects provides evidence to show that UK Government’s Big Society policy depends, not on additional government intervention beyond finance, but partnerships on the basis of responsible capitalism and community co-operativism, involving all three market sectors – people, private and public. By using the capital and ‘payment in kind’ of responsible capitalist firms, in addition to charitable funding and government grants means partnerships across sectors can provide a significant degree of match funding for Big Society projects. The chapter recommends that the private sector get involved in increasing efficiency in Big Society run on a people sector basis, through taking advantage of outsourcing. This enabled them to fulfil their social or moral causes through didactic activism with better value for money due to efficiency savings in overhead costs.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives. In: P.M. Pumilia-Gnarini, E, Favaron, E. Pacetti, J. Bishop, L, Guerra (Eds.) Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education Incorporating Advancements. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/lessons-from-the-emotivate-project-for-increasing-take-up-of-big-society-and-responsible-capitalism-initiatives.pdf

Cooperative e-learning in the multilingual and multicultural school

Cooperative e-learning in the multilingual and multicultural school: The role of ‘Classroom 2.0’ for increasing participation in education

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The Classroom 2.0 initiative is one of the most fundamental reforms to the way education is performed across the European Union. Starting its life at the Digital Classroom of Tomorrow (DCOT) Project in Wales, the initiative has shown that concepts like electronic individual education programmes (eIEPs) and the electronic twinning of schools (eTwinning) can play an important role in enhancing learning outcomes for school age learners. This chapter presents a review of the impact of the original Classroom 2.0 Project – DCOT – and explores some of the technical issues essential to the project’s success across Europe.

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References

J. Bishop (2012). Cooperative e-learning in the multilingual and multicultural school: The role of ‘Classroom 2.0’ for increasing participation in education. P.M. Pumilia-Gnarini, E, Favaron, E. Pacetti, J. Bishop, L, Guerra (Eds.) Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education Incorporating Advancements. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/cooperative-e-learning-in-the-multilingual-and-multicultural-school-the-role-of-classroom-2-0.pdf

The equatrics of intergenerational knowledge transformation in techno-cultures

The equatrics of intergenerational knowledge transformation in techno-cultures

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to discuss the different generations of people that exists today, the aspects of their characters that the)’ have in common, and the ways in which information systems, such as virtual worlds, can be adapted so that the inevitable conflicts between them are better managed and knowledge transformation among them is more effectively achieved.

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Reference

Bishop, J. (2011). The equatrics of intergenerational knowledge transformation in techno-cultures. Thesis in part fulfillment of the MScEcon in information systems at Aberystwyth University.