Tag Archives: Community Research

Developing and Validating the “This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale”: Optimising Political Online Communities for Internet Trolling

Developing and Validating the “This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale”: Optimising Political Online Communities for Internet Trolling

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Internet trolling describes the posting of any content on the Internet which is provocative or offensive, which is different from the original meaning online in the 1990s, referring to the posting of messages for humourous effect. Those systems operators (sysops) who run online communities are being targeted because of abuse posted on their platforms. Political discussion groups are some of the most prone to trolling, whether consensual or unwanted. Many such websites ara open for anyone to join, meaning when some members post messages they know are offensive but legal, others might find grossly offensive, meaning these messages could be illegal. This paper develops a questionnaire called the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale (TIWWCHNT-20), which aims to help sysops better plan the development of online communities to take account of different users’ capacity to be offended, and for users to self-assess whether they will be suited to an online community. The scale is discussed in relation to different Internet posting techniques where different users will act differently.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2017). Developing and Validating the “This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale”: Optimising Political Online Communities for Internet Trolling. In Y. Ibrahim (Ed.), Politics, Protest, and Empowerment in Digital Spaces (pp. 153-177). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Available at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/developing-and-validating-tiwwchnt-20-scale.pdf

Exploring the Counting of Ballot Papers Using “Delegated Transferable Vote”: Implications for Local and National Elections in the United Kingdom

Exploring the Counting of Ballot Papers Using “Delegated Transferable Vote”: Implications for Local and National Elections in the United Kingdom

Jonathan Bishop and Mark Beech

Abstract

Delegated transferable voting (DTV) refers to an approach to counting votes in elections that extends non-preferential voting systems like First Past The Post (FPTP) to include a transferable element similar to Single Transferable Voting (STV) but instead of voters indicating who they wish their votes to go to on an individual level they entrust that decision in the candidate they vote for, who could be from a small political party that might otherwise be deemed a “wasted vote” under first-past-the-post systems where the candidate they least want could win by having the most votes but still have less than 50% of the popular vote. This chapter discusses how DTV might work in practice through an auto-ethnographic approach in which the authors play an active part in elections in order to test the approach. The elections contested in the UK included to local council level in the Pontypridd area and national elections to the UK Parliament and Welsh Assembly. The potential impact of DTV on these election and method of campaigning used at some of these elections might have had on the voting outcome are discussed.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop & Mark Beech (2017). Exploring the Counting of Ballot Papers Using “Delegated Transferable Vote”: Implications for Local and National Elections in the United Kingdom. In Y. Ibrahim (Ed.), Politics, Protest, and Empowerment in Digital Spaces (pp. 227-243). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Available online: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/counting-ballot-papers-using-dtv.pdf

Increasing The Economic Sustainability Of Online Communities: An Empirical Investigation

Increasing The Economic Sustainability Of Online Communities: An Empirical Investigation

Jonathan Bishop

Citations

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Increasing The Economic Sustainability Of Online Communities: An Empirical Investigation. M.O. Parker and A.D. Petrov (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Sociology Research. Nova Science Publishers. New York, NY. (pages 667-674)
Jonathan Bishop (2009). Increasing The Economic Sustainability Of Online Communities: An Empirical Investigation. Mildred F. Hindsworth and Trevor B. Lang (Eds.) Community Participation and Empowerment. Nova Science Publishers. New York, NY. (pages 349-362)

Trolls Just Want To Have Fun: Electronic Aggression within the Context of e-Participation and Other Online Political Behaviour in the United Kingdom

Trolls Just Want To Have Fun: Electronic Aggression within the Context of e-Participation and Other Online Political Behaviour in the United Kingdom

Shefali Virkar

Abstract

Over the last two decades, public confidence and trust in Government has declined visibly in several Western liberal democracies owing to a distinct lack of opportunities for citizen participation in political processes; and has instead given way instead to disillusionment with current political institutions, actors, and practices. The rise of the Internet as a global communications medium and the advent of digital platforms has opened up huge opportunities and raised new challenges for public institutions and agencies, with digital technology creating new forms of community; empowering citizens and reforming existing power structures in a way that has rendered obsolete or inappropriate many of the tools and processes of traditional democratic politics. Through an analysis of the No. 10 Downing Street ePetitions Initiative based in the United Kingdom, this article seeks to engage with issues related to the innovative use of network technology by Government to involve citizens in policy processes within existing democratic frameworks in order to improve administration, to reform democratic processes, and to renew citizen trust in institutions of governance. In particular, the work seeks to examine whether the application of the new Information and Communication Technologies to participatory democracy in the Government 2.0 era would eventually lead to radical transformations in government functioning, policymaking, and the body politic, or merely to modest, unspectacular political reform and to the emergence of technology-based, obsessive-compulsive pathologies and Internet-based trolling behaviours amongst individuals in society.

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Reference

Shefali Virkar (2014). Trolls Just Want to Have Fun: Electronic Aggression Within the Context of e-Participation and Other Online Political Behaviour in the United Kingdom’, International Journal of E-Politics (Special Issue), Volume 5, Issue 4, pp. 20-50.

Dealing with Internet Trolling in Political Online Communities: Towards the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale

Dealing with Internet Trolling in Political Online Communities: Towards the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Internet trolling has become a popularly used term to describe the posting of any content on the Internet which is provocative or offensive. This is different from the original meaning online in the 1990s, which referred to the posting of provocative messages for humourous effect. Those systems operators (sysops) who run online communities are finding they are being targeted because of abuse posted on their platforms. Political discussion groups are some of the most prone to trolling, whether consensual or unwanted. Many such websites ara open for anyone to join, meaning when some members post messages they know are offensive but legal, others might find grossly offensive, meaning these messages could be illegal. This paper develops a questionnaire called the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale (TIWWCHNT-20), which aims to help sysops better plan the development of online communities to take account of different users’ capacity to be offended, and for users to self-assess whether they will be suited to an online community. The scale is discussed in relation to different Internet posting techniques where different users will act differently.

Full Text

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2014). Dealing with Internet Trolling in Political Online Communities: Towards the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale. International Journal of E-Politics 5(4), 1-20. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/dealing-with-internet-trolling-in-political-online-communities-towards-the-this-is-why-we-cant-have-nice-things-scale.pdf

YouTube if you want to – The lady’s not for blogging: Using ‘bleasures’ and ‘motifs’ to support multimedia forensic analyses of harassment by social media

YouTube if you want to – The lady’s not for blogging: Using ‘bleasures’ and ‘motifs’ to support multimedia forensic analyses of harassment by social media

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The year 2013 will be known in the Internet trolling community as the one where the dark sides of the phenomena were most present. Public figures like Caroline Criado-Perez were targeted with some of the most abusive comments, including threats of rape, many which might have seemed credible at the time. This presentation looks through some of the posts on Twitter and YouTube to find out why such verminous attacks were made. Though using the French legal concepts of Bleasure and Motif as part of a multimedia forensics approach the talk concludes that the most passionate and vile forms of Internet trolling arise out of a contempt trolls have for bias and hypocrisy. Caroline Criado-Perez was abused because she was a woman calling for more women on banknotes and therefore less men. Had she been a Black person calling for more Black people on banknotes she would have received racist comments and not sexist ones – probably from the same people. By looking at other women, namely Salma Yaqoob, Sally Bercow and Esther McVey, the talk concludes that the best way to not be trolled is to advocate rights for a group one does not belong to. It equally concludes that the concepts of Bleasure and Motif can be helping in providing evidence of trolling and the effect it has on others.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2014). YouTube if you want to – The lady’s not for blogging: Using ‘bleasures’ and ‘motifs’ to support multimedia forensic analyses of harassment by social media. Presentation to the Oxford Cyber Harassment Symposium. 27-28 March 2014. St Edmund’s Hall, Oxford University. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/youtube-if-you-want-to-the-ladys-not-for-blogging.pdf

Using the Internet to make local music more available to the South Wales community

Using the Internet to make local music more available to the South Wales community

Jonathan Bishop and Lisa Mannay

Abstract

Wales is the “land of the poets so soothing to me,” according to its national anthem. The political and economic landscape does not on the whole provide for the many creative people that are in Welsh communities. Social media websites like MySpace and YouTube as well as websites like MTV.com, eJay and PeopleSound whilst providing space for artists to share their works, but do not usually consider the needs of local markets, such as in relation to Welsh language provision through to acknowledgement of Welsh place names and Wales’s status as a country. The study finds that there are distinct issues in relation to presenting information via the Web or Tablet based devises and suggests some of the considerations needing when designing.

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References

Jonathan Bishop & Lisa Mannay (2014). Using the Internet to make local music more available to the South Wales community. In: J. Bishop (Ed). Transforming Politics and Policy in the Digital Age. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/using-the-internet-to-make-local-music-more-available-to-the-south-wales-community.pdf

Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters

Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The rise of online communities in Internet environments has set in motion an unprecedented shift in power from vendors of goods and services to the customers who buy them, with those vendors who understand this transfer of power and choose to capitalize on it by organizing online communities and being richly rewarded with both peerless customer loyalty and impressive economic returns. A type of online community, the virtual world, could radically alter the way people work, learn, grow consume, and entertain. Understanding the exchange of social and economic capital in online communities could involve looking at what causes actors to spend their resources on improving someone else’s reputation. Actors’ reputations may affect others’ willingness to trade with them or give them gifts. Investigating online communities reveals a large number of different characters and associated avatars. When an actor looks at another’s avatar they will evaluate them and make decisions that are crucial to creating interaction between customers and vendors in virtual worlds based on the exchange of goods and services. This paper utilizes the ecological cognition framework to understand transactions, characters and avatars in virtual worlds and investigates the exchange of capital in a bulletin board and virtual. The chapter finds strong evidence for the existence of characters and stereotypes based on the Ecological Cognition Framework and empirical evidence that actors using avatars with antisocial connotations are more likely to have a lower return on investment and be rated less positively than those with more sophisticated appearing avatars.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2013). Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Examining the Concepts, Issues and Implications of Internet Trolling. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-capital-revenue-in-social-networking-communities-building-social-and-economic-relationships-through-avatars-and-characters.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2011). Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters. In: IRMA (Ed.). Virtual Communities: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools and Applications. IGI Global: Hershey, PA; pages 1720-1734. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-capital-revenue-in-social-networking-communities-building-social-and-economic-relationships-through-avatars-and-characters.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2008). Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters. In: C. Romm-Livermore & K. Setzekorn (Eds.). Social Networking Communities and EDating Services: Concepts and Implications. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-capital-revenue-in-social-networking-communities-building-social-and-economic-relationships-through-avatars-and-characters.pdf

The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives

The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The rise of social networking services have furthered the proliferation of online communities, transferring the power of controlling access to content from often one person who operates a system (sysop), which they would normally rely on, to them personally. With increased participation in social networking and services come new problems and issues, such as trolling, where unconstructive messages are posted to incite a reaction, and lurking, where persons refuse to participate. Methods of dealing with these abuses included defriending, which can include blocking strangers. The Gamified Flow of Persuasion model is proposed, building on work in ecological cognition and the participation continuum, the chapter shows how all of these models can collectively be used with gamification principles to increase participation in online communities through effective management of lurking, trolling, and defriending.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2014). The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Education, and Psychological Issues. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-psychology-of-trolling-and-lurking-defriending-gamification.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2013). The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Examining the Concepts, Issues, and Implications of Internet Trolling. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-psychology-of-trolling-and-lurking-defriending-gamification.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2012). The Psychology of Trolling and Lurking: The Role of Defriending and Gamification for Increasing Participation in Online Communities Using Seductive Narratives. In: H. Li (Ed.) Virtual Community Participation and Motivation: Cross-Disciplinary Theories. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-psychology-of-trolling-and-lurking-defriending-gamification.pdf

Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives

Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter presents a case study of The Emotivate Project and the role it played in the didactic education of 11 school-age children from the former coalfields communities of Llantwit Fardre and Pontypridd in Wales in the United Kingdom through blended learning (bLearning) and blended twinning (bTwinning). The chapter shows how the Emotivate Projects provides evidence to show that UK Government’s Big Society policy depends, not on additional government intervention beyond finance, but partnerships on the basis of responsible capitalism and community co-operativism, involving all three market sectors – people, private and public. By using the capital and ‘payment in kind’ of responsible capitalist firms, in addition to charitable funding and government grants means partnerships across sectors can provide a significant degree of match funding for Big Society projects. The chapter recommends that the private sector get involved in increasing efficiency in Big Society run on a people sector basis, through taking advantage of outsourcing. This enabled them to fulfil their social or moral causes through didactic activism with better value for money due to efficiency savings in overhead costs.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Lessons from The Emotivate Project for Increasing Take-up of Big Society and Responsible Capitalism Initiatives. In: P.M. Pumilia-Gnarini, E, Favaron, E. Pacetti, J. Bishop, L, Guerra (Eds.) Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education Incorporating Advancements. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/lessons-from-the-emotivate-project-for-increasing-take-up-of-big-society-and-responsible-capitalism-initiatives.pdf