Tag Archives: Autism Research

The impact of physical and virtual environments on human emotions: A pilot study in an adult and community education setting

The impact of physical and virtual environments on human emotions: A pilot study in an adult and community education setting

Jonathan Bishop and Piet Kommers

Abstract

This paper concerns an experiment that attempts to understand the impact the physical and virtual environment can have on human emotions. To do this four blended learning workshops are held covering different amounts of technology enhanced learning based on the blended learning continuum. In each workshop there are two of the same participants – one who is autistic and one who is empathic – and then other participants are introduced depending on the aesthetics of the workshop. The study finds that learners deemed ‘empathic’ require less brain processing for befriending than people deemed ‘autistic’ do and that those deemed autistic treat every environment the same way and at the same time those deemed ‘empathic’ focus more on befriending others, regardless of the environment they are in.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2016). The impact of physical and virtual environments on human emotions: A pilot study in an adult and community education setting. The 14th International Conference on Scientific Computing. 25-28 July 2016. Las Vegas, NV. Available online: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-impact-of-virtual-and-physical-environments-on-human-emotion.pdf

Supporting Communication between People with Social Orientation Impairments Using Affective Computing Technologies: Rethinking the Autism Spectrum

Supporting Communication between People with Social Orientation Impairments Using Affective Computing Technologies: Rethinking the Autism Spectrum

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

A disability is a physical or mental impairment that has an adverse long-term impact on someone’s ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities. This is often thought of in terms of medical conditions with clearly defined symptoms. This chapter, however, argues that it is these symptoms that can be considered to be the impairments and that in the right environment can in fact be advantageous. Someone may be have a medical diagnosis but not be symptomatic due to medication, for instance. In this chapter, a set of symptoms is made up from a number of different scales, called Social-Behavioural Traits (SBTs), which are affected by a person’s Serotonergic-Dopamagenic Asynchronicity (SDA). This chapter discusses the role of affective computing in achieving harmony between people with various personality differences, including a model for explaining how technology can influence SDA and SBTs for the better.

Full Text

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Supporting Communication between People with Social Orientation Impairments Using Affective Computing Technologies: Rethinking the Autism Spectrum. In: Leu Bee Theng (Ed.) Assistive Technologies for Physical and Cognitive Disabilities. IGI Global, Hershey, PA (Pages 42-55). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/supporting-communication-between-people-with-social-orientation-impairments.pdf

The empathic psychopathy in public life: Towards an understanding of ‘autism’ and ’empathism’; as ‘dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity’

The empathic psychopathy in public life: Towards an understanding of ‘autism’ and ’empathism’ and ‘dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity’

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

So-called ‘autism’ is a generally well understood condition yet it is claimed has no known cure, is best dealt with through “early intervention,” and to many is deserving of pity. This poster shows an aetiology of ‘autism’ and what can be called ’empathism’ as being caused by ‘dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity’ that results in ‘autistic’ functions of the brain and ‘empathic’ ones being used unequally, with one being more predominant than the other. The poster argues that those who overuse the ‘empathic’ parts of the brain suffer from ‘empathism’ which impairs their relationship skills as much as social skills are impaired in people with ‘autism,’ who overuse the ‘autistic’ parts of their brain. The poster concludes by discussing how the researcher’s advancements in affective computing could be used to assist people with the symptoms of obsessive compulsive and narcissistic disorders that result from the mental dependence to an imbalance in serotonin and dopamine activity in the brain. The poster displays two diagrams linking these together, including the relationship between autism and empathism with regards to other so-called personality disorders.

Full Text

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2013). ‘The empathic psychopathy in public life: Towards an understanding of ‘autism’ and ’empathism’ and ‘dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity.‘ Poster presented to the Implications of Research on the Neuroscience of Affect, Attachment, and Social Cognition Conference. 18th May 2013 – 19th May 2013. University College London, London, GB. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-empathic-psychopathy-in-public-life.pdf

The role of the prefrontal cortex in social orientation construction: A pilot study

The role of the prefrontal cortex in social orientation construction: A pilot study

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The restoring and maximising of well-being in individuals disadvantaged or traumatised by physical, neurological, psychological or social causes therefore becomes a significant issue for all professionals whether in life, social or information sciences. This poster presents a review of the literature to establish a prima facie case for investigating the role of the prefrontal cortex in predetermining outcomes of the with medicalised social orientation impairments such as autism, Bipolar, Schizophrenia, ADHD, as well as problems relating to occupation health and substance misuse. The characteristics of the pre-frontal cortex are identified from a number of journals and then these terms cross references with those impairments. Anseries of equations are presented on how one might look at representing differences in the pre-frontal cortex by using a post-cognitivist psychology paradigm to represent the psycho-analytical concepts of ‘phantasies’ in a manner that allows for use in questionnaire, statistical analysis, and information system adaptation.

Summary of Conclusions

  • It is emotional dysfunction in the brain that causes most people to be autistic and not them having ‘autism’
  • Someone becomes autistic through a sub-optimal prefrontal cortex which affects working memory, among other factors.
  • A prefrontal cortex can become sub-optimal through lack of brain function to handle social and emotional stressors, such as might be caused by brain injuries such as hippocampal sclerosis
  • It can also become sub-optimal through traumatic abuse, including allergic reactions to vaccines, sex abuse, traumatic birth.
  • Finally, a sub-optimal pre-frontal cortex can come about through genetic mutations in it.
  • The degree of impairment in the prefrontal cortex can be measured through simple alpha and beta brain imaging tools

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2011). The role of the prefrontal cortex in social orientation construction: A pilot study. Poster presented to the British Psychological Society’s Sustainable Well-Being Conference. Glyndwr University, Wrexham, 10 September 2011. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-role-of-the-prefrontal-cortex-in-social-orientation-construction.pdf

The Role of Augmented E-Learning Systems for Enhancing Pro-Social Behaviour in Socially Impaired Individuals

The Role of Augmented E-Learning Systems for Enhancing Pro-Social Behaviour in Socially Impaired Individuals

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

E-learning systems generally rely on good visual and cognitive abilities, making them suitable for individuals with good levels of intelligence in these areas. A group of such individuals are those with non-systemising impairments (NSIs), such as people with autism spectrum conditions (ASCs). These individuals could benefit greatly from technology that allows them to use their abilities to overcome their impairments in social and emotional functioning in order to develop pro-social behaviours. Existing systems such as PARLE and MindReading are discussed, and a new one, the Visual Ontological Imitation System (VOIS), is proposed and discussed. This chapter details an investigation into the acceptability of these systems by those working in social work and advocacy. The study found that VOIS would be well received, although dependency on assistive technology and its impact on how others view NSIs still need to be addressed by society and its institutions.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2011). The Role of Augmented E-Learning Systems for Enhancing Pro-Social Behaviour in Socially Impaired Individuals. In: Lau Bee Theng (Ed.) Assistive and Augmentive Communication for the Disabled: Intelligent Technologies for Communication, Learning and Teaching. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. (Pages 248-272). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-role-of-augmented-e-learning-systems-for-enhancing-pro-social-behaviour-in-socially-impaired-individuals.pdf

The autistic qualities of Robin Hood: Ardent leader or detached brigand?

The autistic qualities of Robin Hood: Ardent leader or detached brigand?

Jonathan Bishop

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2007). The autistic qualities of Robin Hood: Ardent leader or detached brigand? Speech to the 2007 Conference of the International Association of Robin Hood Studies. Gregynog Hall, Gregynog, Powys.

The Internet for educating individuals with social impairments

The Internet for educating individuals with social impairments

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Social impairments materialise in a number of forms, from developmental disabilities such as autistic spectrum disorder, to psychiatric conditions such as social phobia. The individuals diagnosed with these problems find it difficult to deal with social situations through either the inability to perform in these situations or the fear of not being able to do so. The study investigated the social and practical implications of using Mobile Internet technology to deliver information relating to a social situation in real-time to participants with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (n = 10) and General Social Phobia (n = 3) diagnosed using DSM-IV. The participants used the agent on their mobile phone to convert phrases they found offensive or confusing into more concise and understandable definitions. Analysing their attitudes found that the technology enables socially impaired individuals to learn the meaning of emotions and understand more about how they communicate with their peers. However, the study concludes that governmental organisations, education providers and society as a whole need to adopt a cohesive approach to communication to ensure socially impaired individuals are fully included in society

Full Text

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2003). The Internet for educating individuals with social impairments. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning 19(4), pp. 546-556. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-internet-for-educating-individuals-with-social-impairments.pdf