Tag Archives: Assisting Human Interaction

The role of affective computing for ensuring safety in at-risk educational environments: The development of ‘VoisJet’ and ‘VoisEye’ for forensic phonetical analysis

The role of affective computing for ensuring safety in at-risk educational environments: The development of ‘VoisJet’ and ‘VoisEye’ for forensic phonetical analysis

Jonathan Bishop and Darren Bellenger

Abtract

This paper presents an introduction to the use of affective computing in at-risk educational environments, such as those that schools located in areas where there is armed conflict and for the safeguarding of children and at-risk adults more generally. This paper has discussed the improvement of the EigenFace based facial emotion recognition by continually streamlining the facial dataset used and its application in at-risk educational environments. One of these mimics the authors’ EigenFaces library and appears to have better performance in poor lighting and poor camera situations, making it possibly better for drone use. It is therefore paramount that as the authors develop the system further that they keep each component separate, in case it is decided to utilise commercial libraries (e.g. Microsoft Project Oxford) for certain aspects. A structure such as VoisOver that allows for third party technologies to be plugged in would mean the authors’ code can remain separate from that of third party plug-ins, namely specific algorithms for identifying the core 12 emotion sets the authors have devised in contexts that might not even have been considered yet. Such algorithms could work with the system described in this paper to make its operation in at-risk educational environments even more possible.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop and Darren Bellenger (2016). The role of affective computing for ensuring safety in at-risk educational environments: The development of ‘VoisJet’ and ‘VoisEye’ for forensic phonetical analysis. The 2016 International Conference on Computational Science and Computational Intelligence (CSCI’2016). 15-17 December 2016, Las Vegas, NV. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/affective-computing-for-ensuring-safety-in-at-risk-educational-environments.pdf

Reducing Corruption and Protecting Privacy in Emerging Economies: The Potential of Neuroeconomic Gamification and Western Media Regulation in Trust Building and Economic Growth

Reducing Corruption and Protecting Privacy in Emerging Economies: The Potential of Neuroeconomic Gamification and Western Media Regulation in Trust Building and Economic Growth

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter presents a location-based affective computing system, which can assist growing emerging markets by helping them reduce crime and increase public safety when used in conjunction with CCTV. Internet systems based on location-based services have increased in availability. Social platforms such as Twitter and Facebook now employ the information on user locations to provide context to their posts, and services such as Foursquare rely on people checking into different places, often to compete with their friends and others. Location-based information, when combined with other records, such as CCTV, promotes the opportunity for a better society. People normally abused by corrupt state officials for crimes they did not commit will now have alibis, shops will be able to more effectively build trust and procure new customers through “social proof,” and other forms of corruption will be tackled such as benefit fraud and tax evasion. Trust that everyone is paying his or her fair share can develop.

Full Text

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2013). Reducing Corruption and Protecting Privacy in Emerging Economies: The Potential of Neuroeconomic Gamification and Western Media Regulation in Trust Building and Economic Growth. In: Bryan Christiansenand Muslum Basilgan (Eds.) Economic Behavior, Game Theory, and Technology in Emerging Markets. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. (Pages 237-249). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/reducing-corruption-and-protecting-privact-in-emerging-economies-the-potential-of-neuroeonomic-gamification-and-western-media-regulation-in-trust-building-and-economic-growth.pdf

Towards a subjectively devised parametric user model for analysing and influencing behaviour online using neuroeconomics

Towards a subjectively devised parametric user model for analysing and influencing behaviour online using neuroeconomics

Jonathan Bishop and Mark MH Goode

Abstract

The quantitative-qualitative and subjectivity-objectivity debates plague research methods text-books, divide academic departments, and confuse post-modernists as to their existence. Those from the objective-quantitative camps will usually demand methods assume parametric principles from the start, such as homogeneity and normal distribution. Many of the subjective-qualitative camps will insist on looking and the individual meanings behind what someone is saying through their narratives and other discourses. The objective-quantitative camps on the other hand think anything that does not involve systematic acquisition and analysis or data cannot be valid. This chapter presents an approach to derive a parametric user model for understanding users that makes use of the premises and ideals of both these camps.

Full Text

Reference

Jonathan Bishop & Mark M.H. Goode (2014). ‘Towards a subjectively devised parametric user model for analysing and influencing behaviour online using neuroeconomics‘ In: J. Bishop (Ed). Gamification for Human Factors Integration: Social, Educational, and Psychological Issues. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. (Pages: 80-95). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/towards-a-subjective-parametric-user-model-for-analysing-and-inlfluencing-online-behaviour-using-neuroeconomics.pdf

The empathic psychopathy in public life: Towards an understanding of ‘autism’ and ’empathism’; as ‘dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity’

The empathic psychopathy in public life: Towards an understanding of ‘autism’ and ’empathism’ and ‘dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity’

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

So-called ‘autism’ is a generally well understood condition yet it is claimed has no known cure, is best dealt with through “early intervention,” and to many is deserving of pity. This poster shows an aetiology of ‘autism’ and what can be called ’empathism’ as being caused by ‘dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity’ that results in ‘autistic’ functions of the brain and ‘empathic’ ones being used unequally, with one being more predominant than the other. The poster argues that those who overuse the ‘empathic’ parts of the brain suffer from ‘empathism’ which impairs their relationship skills as much as social skills are impaired in people with ‘autism,’ who overuse the ‘autistic’ parts of their brain. The poster concludes by discussing how the researcher’s advancements in affective computing could be used to assist people with the symptoms of obsessive compulsive and narcissistic disorders that result from the mental dependence to an imbalance in serotonin and dopamine activity in the brain. The poster displays two diagrams linking these together, including the relationship between autism and empathism with regards to other so-called personality disorders.

Full Text

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2013). ‘The empathic psychopathy in public life: Towards an understanding of ‘autism’ and ’empathism’ and ‘dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity.‘ Poster presented to the Implications of Research on the Neuroscience of Affect, Attachment, and Social Cognition Conference. 18th May 2013 – 19th May 2013. University College London, London, GB. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-empathic-psychopathy-in-public-life.pdf

Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization  for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online

Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization  for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Chatroom Bobs, which derived from the concept of ‘Uncle Bob’ being a name for a less than responsible family man, are characterised by being online community users driven by seeking out satisfaction for their ‘urgeances’ (or biological drives). Some of these are akin to the ‘office loser’ who tries to impress others but is despised, others have more ulterior motives for sexual satisfaction. This paper presents an intervention – called MEDIAT – which uses TAGTeach to retrain people who are sexually damaged by society and demonstrate impairment in how they interact with others. The paper presents an equation for measuring such ‘social orientation impairment’ as a reflection of its relationship to serotonergic and dopaminergic activity in the prefrontal cortex as a result of differences in ‘Neuro-response plasticity’. The paper concludes that by using MEDIAT to reverse dopaminergic-serotonergic asynchronicity caused by traumatic experience can lead to increased constructive participation in online and other environments.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Taming the Chatroom Bob: The role of brain-computer interfaces that manipulate prefrontal cortex optimization for increasing participation of victims of traumatic sex and other abuse online. In: 13th International Conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BIOCOMP’12), 16-19 July 2012, USA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/taming-the-chatroom-bob-the-role-of-brain-computer-interfaces-that-manipulate-prefrontal-cortex-optimization-for-increasing-participation-of-victims-of-traumatic-sex-and-other-abuse-online.pdf

The Persuasive and Assistive Interaction Extension (PAIX): A position paper on using gamified behavior management systems for reducing flame trolling in schools based on Classroom 2.0

The Persuasive and Assistive Interaction Extension (PAIX): A position paper on using gamified behavior management systems for reducing flame trolling in schools based on Classroom 2.0

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Internet trolling that takes the form of cyberbullying is emerging as a significant problem for any administrator of a networked computer environment. This is also the case in Classroom 2.0 classrooms where technologies like the circle of friends has not been implemented or otherwise where there is no current moderation or monitoring of activity of the school students using the system. The paper presents a system called Paix – The Persuasive and Assistive Interaction Extension (Paix) for assisting with this problem.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2012). The Persuasive and Assistive Interaction Extension (PAIX): A position paper on using gamified behavior management systems for reducing flame trolling in schools based on Classroom 2.0. The 13th International Conference on Internet Computing (ICOMP’12). 16-19 July, 2012, USA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-persuasive-and-assistive-interaction-extension-paix-a-position-paper-on-using-gamified-behavior-management-systems-for-reducing-flame-trolling-in-schools-based-on-classroom-2-0.pdf

The role of the prefrontal cortex in social orientation construction: A pilot study

The role of the prefrontal cortex in social orientation construction: A pilot study

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The restoring and maximising of well-being in individuals disadvantaged or traumatised by physical, neurological, psychological or social causes therefore becomes a significant issue for all professionals whether in life, social or information sciences. This poster presents a review of the literature to establish a prima facie case for investigating the role of the prefrontal cortex in predetermining outcomes of the with medicalised social orientation impairments such as autism, Bipolar, Schizophrenia, ADHD, as well as problems relating to occupation health and substance misuse. The characteristics of the pre-frontal cortex are identified from a number of journals and then these terms cross references with those impairments. Anseries of equations are presented on how one might look at representing differences in the pre-frontal cortex by using a post-cognitivist psychology paradigm to represent the psycho-analytical concepts of ‘phantasies’ in a manner that allows for use in questionnaire, statistical analysis, and information system adaptation.

Summary of Conclusions

  • It is emotional dysfunction in the brain that causes most people to be autistic and not them having ‘autism’
  • Someone becomes autistic through a sub-optimal prefrontal cortex which affects working memory, among other factors.
  • A prefrontal cortex can become sub-optimal through lack of brain function to handle social and emotional stressors, such as might be caused by brain injuries such as hippocampal sclerosis
  • It can also become sub-optimal through traumatic abuse, including allergic reactions to vaccines, sex abuse, traumatic birth.
  • Finally, a sub-optimal pre-frontal cortex can come about through genetic mutations in it.
  • The degree of impairment in the prefrontal cortex can be measured through simple alpha and beta brain imaging tools

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2011). The role of the prefrontal cortex in social orientation construction: A pilot study. Poster presented to the British Psychological Society’s Sustainable Well-Being Conference. Glyndwr University, Wrexham, 10 September 2011. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-role-of-the-prefrontal-cortex-in-social-orientation-construction.pdf

The Role of Augmented E-Learning Systems for Enhancing Pro-Social Behaviour in Socially Impaired Individuals

The Role of Augmented E-Learning Systems for Enhancing Pro-Social Behaviour in Socially Impaired Individuals

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

E-learning systems generally rely on good visual and cognitive abilities, making them suitable for individuals with good levels of intelligence in these areas. A group of such individuals are those with non-systemising impairments (NSIs), such as people with autism spectrum conditions (ASCs). These individuals could benefit greatly from technology that allows them to use their abilities to overcome their impairments in social and emotional functioning in order to develop pro-social behaviours. Existing systems such as PARLE and MindReading are discussed, and a new one, the Visual Ontological Imitation System (VOIS), is proposed and discussed. This chapter details an investigation into the acceptability of these systems by those working in social work and advocacy. The study found that VOIS would be well received, although dependency on assistive technology and its impact on how others view NSIs still need to be addressed by society and its institutions.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2011). The Role of Augmented E-Learning Systems for Enhancing Pro-Social Behaviour in Socially Impaired Individuals. In: Lau Bee Theng (Ed.) Assistive and Augmentive Communication for the Disabled: Intelligent Technologies for Communication, Learning and Teaching. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. (Pages 248-272). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-role-of-augmented-e-learning-systems-for-enhancing-pro-social-behaviour-in-socially-impaired-individuals.pdf

The Role of Multi-Agent Social Networking Systems in Ubiquitous Education: Enhancing Peer-Supported Reflective Learning

The Role of Multi-Agent Social Networking Systems in Ubiquitous Education: Enhancing Peer-Supported Reflective Learning

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Knowledge it could be argued is constructed from the information actors pick up from the environments they are in. Understanding the networks of practice in which these e-learning systems are part of requires a deeper understanding of information science frameworks. The Ecological Cognition Framework (ECF) provides a thorough understanding of how actors respond to and influence their environment. Utilising the ECF, this chapter proposes a multi-agent e-learning system called the Portable Assistant for Intelligently Guided Education (PAIGE), which is based around a 3D anthropomorphic avatar for educating actors ubiquitously. An investigation into the market for PAIGE was carried out. The data showed that those that thought their peers were the best form of support were less likely to spend more of their free time on homework. The chapter suggests that future research could investigate the usage of systems like PAIGE in educational settings and the effect they have on learning outcomes.

Full Text

References

Jonathan Bishop (2009). The Role of Multi-Agent Social Networking Systems in Ubiquitous Education: Enhancing Peer-Supported Reflective Learning. In: T.T. Goh (Ed.). Multiplatform E-Learning Systems and Technologies: Mobile Devices for Ubiquitous ICT-Based Education. IGI Global: New York, NY (Pages 72-88). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-role-of-multi-agent-social-networking-systems-in-ubiquitous-education-paige-jonathanbishop.pdf