Author Archives: Jonathan Bishop

Call for Papers: Special Issue on Hypermedia Seduction and Persuasion

Call for Papers: Special Issue on Hypermedia Seduction and Persuasion

Submission Due Date

15 January 2018

Guest Editor

  • Jonathan Bishop
    • Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, European Parliament, Brussels, BE

Journal

The International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation

Introduction

Hypermedia systems can include any system based around hypertext, whether on the World Wide Web, optical media, mobile phones, or similar. This special issue aims to investigate how to use principles from seduction and persuasion to improve the experience of users of these systems, such as to increase the time they use a given hypermedia system, such as increasing the stickiness of web portals or social media platforms. The special issue also aims to look at issues around addiction and compulsive behaviour online, and other risks that can come from using seduction and persuasive principles irresponsibly.

Objective

The objective of the proposed Special Issue is to highlight the specific issues and challenges to implement principles of seduction and persuasion in hypermedia systems. Research contributions in this special issue will provide insights about the nature of seduction and persuasion in relation to technology. The contents in this special issue are of interest for researchers working in the domains of seduction, persuasion, captology, cyberculture, e-politics, e-society, sociology, cybercultures and multimedia studies, and cognitive science.

Recommended Topics

Topics to be discussed in this special issue include (but are not limited to) the following in the context of seduction and persuasion in hypermedia systems.

  • Hypermedia seduction
  • Persuasion, captology
  • Internet and gaming addiction
  • Cognitive load
  • Flow, involvement
  • Stickiness and website loyalty
  • Memes and cultural symbosis
  • Gamification, gambling, online poker
  • Cybersex, porn e-vengers

Submission Procedure

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit papers for this special theme issue on Hypermedia Seduction and Persuasion. All submitted papers will be reviewed on a peer review basis. Papers must follow APA style for reference citations.

NB. Papers can be submitted any time before the deadline with “SEDUCE’18” in the subject bar. Reviewing will take place throughout the period of the advertising of this call for papers. Successful papers for the special issue will be give a letter of approval so the authors can put their publication on their CVs.

Important Dates

  • Abstract Deadline: 15 January 2018
  • Submission Deadline: 15 February 2018
  • Notification Due: 15 March 2018
  • Final Version: 30 April 2018

All submissions and inquiries should be directed to the attention of:

Jonathan Bishop FRSA
E-mail: jonathan.bishop@crocels.ac.uk
Centre for Research into Online Communities and E-Learning Systems, Crocels Community Media Group

Classroom 2.0 and Beyond: Education, Health, Economic and Justice Policies for Exeter

Classroom 2.0 and Beyond: Education, Health, Economic and Justice Policies for Exeter

Jonathan Bishop

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2017). Classroom 2.0 and Beyond: Education, Health, Economic and Justice Policies for Exeter. The Third International Congress on the Internet, Trolling and Addiction (ITA’17), 30 May 2017 to 7 June 2017, Clyst Vale, Exeter. Speech made at Broadclyst Victory Hall, Broadclyst, Clyst Vale, Exeter.

Special Issue on Accessible Online Participation

International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation

Special Issue on Accessible Online Participation

Contents

Publication Information

  • Edited by Jonathan Bishop.
  • Published by The Crocels Press Limited.
  • ISSN: 2050-6244 (Online) 2050-6236 (Print).
  • Copyright: Jonathan Bishop Limited (2016).

A Touch-Screen Learning Environment for educating individuals with learning impairments

A Touch-Screen Learning Environment for educating individuals with learning impairments

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This study investigates the use of a touch-screen e-learning application that has audio-support to teach individuals with learning impairments. By undertaking a limited evaluation, the study found the learners (n=3) improved their vocabulary and were more able to make associations between words. The study demonstrated that along with a traditional linear navigation system, audio support can increase the satisfaction of using e-learning systems to individuals with social impairments, as they feel more in control and able to understand how to use and navigate such systems.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (In Press). A Touch-Screen Learning Environment for educating individuals with learning impairments. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation.

Representations of Jewish and Arab Citizens in Western Social and Mass Media during Times of Diaspora: Considering World War II and the War on Terror

Representations of Jewish and Arab Citizens in Western Social and Mass Media during Times of Diaspora: Considering World War II and the War on Terror

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Commonalities can be found in how countries have dealt with Jewish refugees before and after World War II and how Arabs are being spoken about during the War on Terror. Anti-Semitic sentiment towards Jews around the time of the Nazis matches the Islamophobia sentiment following the rise of ISIS. Antagonistic attitudes towards those of Jewish ethnicity has persisted even today, with references to the holocaust being pervasive on social media. Equally, attitudes towards Muslims has been equally divisive on such platforms. During World War II there was emotive language to the diaspora of Jews into the Holy Land and during the War on Terror, attitudes to the diaspora of Arabs into Europe has been equally distasteful. This paper investigates media representations of Jews and Arabs in the 1930s and 2010s, concluding that many of the issues that were prominent in the lead up to World War II are also prominent during the War on Terror.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2017). Representations of Jewish and Arab Citizens in Western Social and Mass Media during Times of Diaspora: Considering World War II and the War on Terror. In: Focus on Terrorism. Nova Science Publishers: New York, NY. Available at: http://research.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/6/2017/05/jewish-arab-citizens-western-social-mass-media-times-of-diaspora.pdf

Improving Homeland Security through Dualist Identity Card Schemes and Mass Surveillance: Interviews with a Victim of Public Sector Brutality and a Licensed Alcohol Seller

Improving Homeland Security through Dualist Identity Card Schemes and Mass Surveillance: Interviews with a Victim of Public Sector Brutality and a Licensed Alcohol Seller

Jonathan Bishop

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2017). Improving Homeland Security through Dualist Identity Card Schemes and Mass Surveillance: Interviews with a Victim of Public Sector Brutality and a Licensed Alcohol Seller. In: Homeland Security: Perceptions, Threats and Challenges for the Next Administration. Nova Science Publishers: New York, NY.

Ensuring the future of markets for dance education: Considering the role of informal learning through the prism of Yahoo!Answers

Ensuring the future of markets for dance education: Considering the role of informal learning through the prism of Yahoo!Answers

Jonathan Bishop

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2017). Ensuring the future of markets for dance education: Considering the role of informal learning through the prism of Yahoo!Answers. In: Jonathan Bishop (Ed.) The Digital Media Reader: Media, Culture, Society and Politics in the Digital Age. The Crocels Press Limited: Swansea, GB (Pages 53-70).

Online Trolling: The Case of Madeleine McCann

Online Trolling: The Case of Madeleine McCann

John Synnott, Andria Coulias, Maria Ioannou

Abstract

Despite the sustained media attention surrounding internet trolling, academic studies investigating its occurrence are rare. This study aimed to provide a case study analysis of the behaviours and strategies of a group of alleged Twitter trolls referred to as the anti-McCanns due to their continual abuse of Kate and Gerry McCann as well as those who support them and thus identify as pro-McCann. The way in which language was used to construct the anti-McCanns group identity, enhance in-group cohesion and facilitate out-group disassociation from the pro-Mccann group was additionally explored, given that previous research has implicated group processes in the propagation of aggressive online conduct. A multi-method approach involving a combination of ethnographic observations and the collection of online commentary was employed. The data was then analysed using quantitative content analysis and discourse analysis, which indicated that language was utilised in a variety of ways by the anti-McCanns to construct a salient group identity and negatively stereotype and disassociate from the pro-McCann group. Findings additionally revealed that several strategies were employed by the anti-McCann trolls to provoke and derogate members of the pro-McCann group, supporting previous findings which have linked trolling to both western media culture and the characteristics of anti-social personality disorder. The implications of these findings both theoretical and practical are discussed, alongside recommendations for future research.

Citation

John Synnott, Andria Coulias, Maria Ioannou (2017). Online Trolling: The Case of Madeleine McCann. Computers in Human Behavior.

Detecting Sexual Harassment in Workplace Electronic Communications Networks: The Role of “PROTEGER” for Augmentive Behaviour Monitoring

Detecting Sexual Harassment in Workplace Electronic Communications Networks: The Role of “PROTEGER” for Augmentive Behaviour Monitoring

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Sexual harassment has been a problem within organisations for some time. Its manifestation in electronic communication networks can be seen to amount to cyber-bullying or cyber-stalking. Through looking at records relating to an instance of sexual harassment at a higher education institution, including from that member of staff’s workplace, and those created by referrals to the police, the court service, and their workplace, this chapter shows how a piece of assistive technology called the ‘Protective Technology for Ensuring Guardianship of Environmental Resources’ (PROTEGER) can automatically detect sexual harassment narratives. In this context, ‘environmental resources’ should refer to both humans and documents. Human resource managers would be better equipped to deal with disputes between staff if PROTEGER was running on their local area network as it might not be a matter of one member of staff’s word against another’s.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2017). Detecting Sexual Harassment in Workplace Electronic Communications Networks: The Role of “PROTEGER” for Augmentive Behaviour Monitoring. In B. Christiansen, & H. Chandan (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Organizational Culture and Diversity in the Modern Workforce (pp. 181-216). Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Brain–Computer Interface–Based Communication in the Completely Locked-In State

Brain–Computer Interface–Based Communication in the Completely Locked-In State

Ujwal Chaudhary , Bin Xia, Stefano Silvoni, Leonardo G. Cohen & Niels Birbaumer

Abstract

Despite partial success, communication has remained impossible for persons suffering from complete motor paralysis but intact cognitive and emotional processing, a state called complete locked-in state (CLIS). Based on a motor learning theoretical context and on the failure of neuroelectric brain–computer interface (BCI) communication attempts in CLIS, we here report BCI communication using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and an implicit attentional processing procedure. Four patients suffering from advanced amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)—two of them in permanent CLIS and two entering the CLIS without reliable means of communication—learned to answer personal questions with known answers and open questions all requiring a “yes” or “no” thought using frontocentral oxygenation changes measured with fNIRS. Three patients completed more than 46 sessions spread over several weeks, and one patient (patient W) completed 20 sessions. Online fNIRS classification of personal questions with known answers and open questions using linear support vector machine (SVM) resulted in an above-chance-level correct response rate over 70%. Electroencephalographic oscillations and electrooculographic signals did not exceed the chance-level threshold for correct communication despite occasional differences between the physiological signals representing a “yes” or “no” response. However, electroencephalogram (EEG) changes in the theta-frequency band correlated with inferior communication performance, probably because of decreased vigilance and attention. If replicated with ALS patients in CLIS, these positive results could indicate the first step towards abolition of complete locked-in states, at least for ALS.

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Citation

Chaudhary U, Xia B, Silvoni S, Cohen LG, Birbaumer N (2017) Brain–Computer Interface–Based Communication in the Completely Locked-In State. PLoS Biol 15(1)