Category Archives: Conference Workshops and Sessions

Classroom 2.0 and Beyond: Education, Health, Economic and Justice Policies for Exeter

Classroom 2.0 and Beyond: Education, Health, Economic and Justice Policies for Exeter

Jonathan Bishop

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2017). Classroom 2.0 and Beyond: Education, Health, Economic and Justice Policies for Exeter. The Third International Congress on the Internet, Trolling and Addiction (ITA’17), 30 May 2017 to 7 June 2017, Clyst Vale, Exeter. Speech made at Broadclyst Victory Hall, Broadclyst, Clyst Vale, Exeter.

Sex and age biases in Tweets relating to the 2015 migration crisis

Sex and age biases in Tweets relating to the 2015 migration crisis

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The 2015 migration crisis arose out of the interference of Western government in the affairs of countries affected by the Arab Spring Uprisings. Attitudes towards immigration can be very strong, with even UK Prime Minister David Cameron describing the increased asylum applications as a result of his failed foreign policies a “swarm.” This talk looks at how attitudes towards immigration have been expressed on Twitter and the extent to which sex and age biases shape or otherwise the moral compass of those in the Twittersphere.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Sex and age biases in Tweets relating to the 2015 migration crisis. Diaspora Beyond Nationalism Conference. 16 September 2015. Cardiff University, Cardiff, GB.

Participation Transformation in Online Communities: From Lurker to Poster

Participation Transformation in Online Communities: From Lurker to Poster

Jonathan Bishop

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop. Participation Transformation in Online Communities: From Lurker to Poster. Transformations Conference. Cardiff University.

The Misrepresentation of Digital Teens as Trolls: Considering Political, News and Feminist Agendas

The Misrepresentation of Digital Teens as Trolls: Considering Political, News and Feminist Agendas

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

If one pays attention to popular culture and the mass media, Internet trolls are unemployed young men in their 20s at home in their parents’ basement spending their time posting abusive messages online. This study finds that this stereotype, whilst common in the mass media, is not representative of the empirical data collected. The research found that most trolling on blogs and defriending is done by women and because of other women. It finds that the people who troll are unlikely to be youths not in education, employment or training (NEETs), but more likely to be those in wealthy areas who are bored. It equally finds that those who troll, or indeed troll-call, are likely to show the symptoms of antisocial personality disorder and histrionic personality disorder respectively. With the media focussing on represent young people as trolls, the research finds that the existence of benevolent sexism in the police perpetuates this myth, meaning women are getting more favourably treatment, either as trolls or troll-callers. In fact the research finds trolls are as likely to be men or women, and they will change the way they troll based on their target, meaning feminists deemed misandrist will face sexist posts including from women, but the same trolls, regardless of their sex, would have used racist remarks if the feminists calling for more rights for women were Black and calling for more rights for Black people. The research concludes that deterring trolling requires a community-led approach, where local government can use their law enforcement powers, such as to issue fixed penalty notices or anti-social behaviour orders, against those trolls they can prove took part in trolling by using their surveillance rights.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). The Misrepresentation of Digital Teens as Trolls: Considering Political, News and Feminist Agendas. Invited Speech to the 13th International Conference on E-Society (E-Society 2015), Madeira, Portugal, 14-16 March 2015.

Crowdfunding WordPress plugins – The case of QPress

Crowdfunding WordPress plugins – The case of QPress

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

I have been conducting research into crowd-funding of WordPress plugins, which has resulted in many publications. This talk would present a case study of the crowd-funding of QPress, an almost complete WordPress plugin. The study has looked at various geographical factors in the advertising of crowd-funded projects, finding that advertising should be fixed to locations where clicks on adverts are not done to raise funds for the websites they are displayed on. It finds clearly that crowd funded projects need to be agile – built in several stages – and involve contingent working – where people only work on it when funds exist.

Presentation

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Crowdfunding WordPress plugins – The case of QPress. WordCamp Birmingham. 8 February 2015.

Learning from the Credit Crunch: Towards Fiscal Prudence in European Union Institutions

Learning from the Credit Crunch: Towards Fiscal Prudence in European Union Institutions

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Why did the credit crunch happen? Most say it was because of the sub-prime mortgage lending in the US, and I agree that sub-prime lending was the reason, but not just in the US. I believe that the banks were lending money to people who couldn’t afford it for the following reasons: (1) The bankers would get commission for each sale they made, and the higher the value of the property the more commission they would get (2) By lending the money to those who couldn’t afforded it, they were ‘banking on them’ defaulting on the mortgage so they could repossess the house and it would be rich pickings for them.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Learning from the Credit Crunch: Towards Fiscal Prudence in European Union Institutions. Third Conference on European Law & Policy in Context. Integration or Disintegration? Birmingham University, June 2012.

The autistic qualities of Robin Hood: Ardent leader or detached brigand?

The autistic qualities of Robin Hood: Ardent leader or detached brigand?

Jonathan Bishop

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2007). The autistic qualities of Robin Hood: Ardent leader or detached brigand? Speech to the 2007 Conference of the International Association of Robin Hood Studies. Gregynog Hall, Gregynog, Powys.