Category Archives: The DCOT Project

An analysis of the implications of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs for networked learning design and delivery

An analysis of the implications of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs for networked learning design and delivery

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The Hierarchy of Needs proposed by Abraham Maslow has been adopted by many groups of practitioners as a way to understand their customers and users. It argues that there are universal human needs, namely physiological, security/safety, social, self-esteem/ego and self-actualisation. Maslow contests that unless the former of these are met, the latter cannot be. This paper demonstrates the need for the continual review and modification of teaching and learning plans to meet the changing needs of learners, which in this case relates to considering the impact of networked learning.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2016). An analysis of the implications of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs for networked learning design and delivery. International Conference on Information and Knowledge Engineering (IKE’16). Available online at: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jonathan_Bishop4/publication/307533183_An_analysis_of_the_implications_of_Maslow’s_Hierarchy_of_Needs_for_networked_learning_design_and_delivery/links/580bf60e08ae74852b5a7363.pdf

Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters

Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The rise of online communities in Internet environments has set in motion an unprecedented shift in power from vendors of goods and services to the customers who buy them, with those vendors who understand this transfer of power and choose to capitalize on it by organizing online communities and being richly rewarded with both peerless customer loyalty and impressive economic returns. A type of online community, the virtual world, could radically alter the way people work, learn, grow consume, and entertain. Understanding the exchange of social and economic capital in online communities could involve looking at what causes actors to spend their resources on improving someone else’s reputation. Actors’ reputations may affect others’ willingness to trade with them or give them gifts. Investigating online communities reveals a large number of different characters and associated avatars. When an actor looks at another’s avatar they will evaluate them and make decisions that are crucial to creating interaction between customers and vendors in virtual worlds based on the exchange of goods and services. This paper utilizes the ecological cognition framework to understand transactions, characters and avatars in virtual worlds and investigates the exchange of capital in a bulletin board and virtual. The chapter finds strong evidence for the existence of characters and stereotypes based on the Ecological Cognition Framework and empirical evidence that actors using avatars with antisocial connotations are more likely to have a lower return on investment and be rated less positively than those with more sophisticated appearing avatars.

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References

Jonathan Bishop (2013). Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters. In: J. Bishop (Ed.) Examining the Concepts, Issues and Implications of Internet Trolling. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-capital-revenue-in-social-networking-communities-building-social-and-economic-relationships-through-avatars-and-characters.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2011). Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters. In: IRMA (Ed.). Virtual Communities: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools and Applications. IGI Global: Hershey, PA; pages 1720-1734. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-capital-revenue-in-social-networking-communities-building-social-and-economic-relationships-through-avatars-and-characters.pdf

Jonathan Bishop (2008). Increasing Capital Revenue in Social Networking Communities: Building Social and Economic Relationships through Avatars and Characters. In: C. Romm-Livermore & K. Setzekorn (Eds.). Social Networking Communities and EDating Services: Concepts and Implications. IGI Global: Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/increasing-capital-revenue-in-social-networking-communities-building-social-and-economic-relationships-through-avatars-and-characters.pdf

Learning in a “Classi 2.0” Classroom: First Results from an Empirical Research in the Italian Context

Learning in a “Classi 2.0” Classroom: First Results from an Empirical Research in the Italian Context

Gabriella Taddeo & Simona Tirocchi

Abstract

The “Classi 2.0” programme is a national applied research project aimed at investigating if and how new media and technologies for producing, communicating, and sharing contents can improve and change learning environments in Italian schools. In this chapter, the discussion centres on scientific sociological research connected to the project carried out by the Polytechnic University of Turin. The research aimed at exploring the main tendencies, expectations, and technological problems both for teachers and for students in coping with digital innovation. In particular, the chapter outlines: the main technological choices of schools, which devices and media are preferred by schools, and how these technologies have been used as tools for reinventing not only learning processes, but also school times and spaces; it also outlines the most interesting changes in social relationship and social challenges that have occurred through the use of such innovative technologies.

Citation

ICT in the Classroom: New Learning Environment

ICT in the Classroom: New Learning Environment

Floriana Falcinelli & Chiara Laici

Abstract

This chapter presents the research carried out by teachers and students of 6 junior high school classes on the modern ICT use in didactics. They participated in the “Cl@ssi2.0” project and were involved in the PoliCultura & Moodle format contained in Learning4All (www.learningforall.it), a section of a national macro-project financed by FIRB (Fondo per gli Investimenti della Ricerca di Base by the Italian Ministry of Education). A short questionnaire focusing on the students’ learning needs and their aptitude for new technologies was administered to students. Some observations were carried out during a normal school day. Some student-centered focus-groups were carried out. A LCMS Moodle environment was planned and implemented to support and expand the educational activities carried out in the classroom. Research has confirmed that technological innovation in school requires a strong support from governance, and teachers who gain the digital competence and a design capacity for innovation in teaching ordinary action.

Citation

Falcinelli, F., & Laici, C. (2012). ICT in the Classroom: New Learning Environment. In P. Pumilia-Gnarini, E. Favaron, E. Pacetti, J. Bishop, & L. Guerra (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education: Incorporating Advancements (pp. 48-56). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Available at: http://www.igi-global.com/chapter/ict-classroom-new-learning-environment/72056

Technology of Education and Music Teaching: New Responses to Old Issues

Technology of Education and Music Teaching: New Responses to Old Issues

Roberto Agostini

Abstract

This chapter discusses the relationship between education technologies and music teaching with reference to four activities developed in an Italian middle school as part of the project of experimentation “Classi2.0.” This project aimed to enhance the ability to perform songs in ensemble and offer experience in the practice of arranging. It also sought to strengthen rhythmic competences, and offer experience in composing rhythms using digital sequencers while also stimulating critical reflections on the musical taste of the class. Furthermore the project sought to provoke critical reflection on media and youth consumption practices.

Citation

Agostini, R. (2012). Technology of Education and Music Teaching: New Responses to Old Issues. In P. Pumilia-Gnarini, E. Favaron, E. Pacetti, J. Bishop, & L. Guerra (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Didactic Strategies and Technologies for Education: Incorporating Advancements (pp. 27-37). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Available at: http://www.igi-global.com/chapter/technology-education-music-teaching/72054