Category Archives: Publications of Crocels Researchers

Classroom 2.0 and Beyond: Education, Health, Economic and Justice Policies for Exeter

Classroom 2.0 and Beyond: Education, Health, Economic and Justice Policies for Exeter

Jonathan Bishop

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2017). Classroom 2.0 and Beyond: Education, Health, Economic and Justice Policies for Exeter. The Third International Congress on the Internet, Trolling and Addiction (ITA’17), 30 May 2017 to 7 June 2017, Clyst Vale, Exeter. Speech made at Broadclyst Victory Hall, Broadclyst, Clyst Vale, Exeter.

A Touch-Screen Learning Environment for educating individuals with learning impairments

A Touch-Screen Learning Environment for educating individuals with learning impairments

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This study investigates the use of a touch-screen e-learning application that has audio-support to teach individuals with learning impairments. By undertaking a limited evaluation, the study found the learners (n=3) improved their vocabulary and were more able to make associations between words. The study demonstrated that along with a traditional linear navigation system, audio support can increase the satisfaction of using e-learning systems to individuals with social impairments, as they feel more in control and able to understand how to use and navigate such systems.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (In Press). A Touch-Screen Learning Environment for educating individuals with learning impairments. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation.

Representations of Jewish and Arab Citizens in Western Social and Mass Media during Times of Diaspora: Considering World War II and the War on Terror

Representations of Jewish and Arab Citizens in Western Social and Mass Media during Times of Diaspora: Considering World War II and the War on Terror

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Commonalities can be found in how countries have dealt with Jewish refugees before and after World War II and how Arabs are being spoken about during the War on Terror. Anti-Semitic sentiment towards Jews around the time of the Nazis matches the Islamophobia sentiment following the rise of ISIS. Antagonistic attitudes towards those of Jewish ethnicity has persisted even today, with references to the holocaust being pervasive on social media. Equally, attitudes towards Muslims has been equally divisive on such platforms. During World War II there was emotive language to the diaspora of Jews into the Holy Land and during the War on Terror, attitudes to the diaspora of Arabs into Europe has been equally distasteful. This paper investigates media representations of Jews and Arabs in the 1930s and 2010s, concluding that many of the issues that were prominent in the lead up to World War II are also prominent during the War on Terror.

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Jonathan Bishop (2017). Representations of Jewish and Arab Citizens in Western Social and Mass Media during Times of Diaspora: Considering World War II and the War on Terror. In: Focus on Terrorism. Nova Science Publishers: New York, NY. Available at: http://research.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/6/2017/05/jewish-arab-citizens-western-social-mass-media-times-of-diaspora.pdf

Improving Homeland Security through Dualist Identity Card Schemes and Mass Surveillance: Interviews with a Victim of Public Sector Brutality and a Licensed Alcohol Seller

Improving Homeland Security through Dualist Identity Card Schemes and Mass Surveillance: Interviews with a Victim of Public Sector Brutality and a Licensed Alcohol Seller

Jonathan Bishop

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2017). Improving Homeland Security through Dualist Identity Card Schemes and Mass Surveillance: Interviews with a Victim of Public Sector Brutality and a Licensed Alcohol Seller. In: Homeland Security: Perceptions, Threats and Challenges for the Next Administration. Nova Science Publishers: New York, NY.

Ensuring the future of markets for dance education: Considering the role of informal learning through the prism of Yahoo!Answers

Ensuring the future of markets for dance education: Considering the role of informal learning through the prism of Yahoo!Answers

Jonathan Bishop

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2017). Ensuring the future of markets for dance education: Considering the role of informal learning through the prism of Yahoo!Answers. In: Jonathan Bishop (Ed.) The Digital Media Reader: Media, Culture, Society and Politics in the Digital Age. The Crocels Press Limited: Swansea, GB (Pages 53-70).

e-minters Online Social Architects: Recognition of Informal Learning in Communities of Interest

e-minters Online Social Architects: Recognition of Informal Learning in Communities of Interest

Niki Lambropoulos

Abstract

As an attempt for informal learning recognition in online Communities of Interest, theory in this chapter was extracted from a dialogue between the members of the e-mint community on lurkers, newcomers and online groupz-ware. Twenty-eight e-mint members offered practical insights for usability and sociability issues towards online communities. Additional theoretical support to the concepts is provided based on social psychology, education, management and communication studies. The theoretical framework that supports Informal Learning and Communities of Interest draws on late 19th century and middle 20th century theories as these were the eras of new approaches related to masses’ interaction. A new methodological framework for data extraction and data analysis is introduced using software-based Social Network Analysis and Content Analysis, on the cluster of messages about lurkers, newcomers and the features of online groupz-ware.

Citation

Niki Lambropoulos (In Press). e-minters Online Social Architects: Recognition of Informal Learning in Communities of Interest. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation.

The Digital Media Reader: Media, Culture, Society an Politics in the Digital Age

The Digital Media Reader: Media, Culture, Society an Politics in the Digital Age

Editor: Jonathan Bishop
Foreword: Niki Lambropoulos

Abstract

The Digital Media Reader combines a number of chapters relating to media practice, identity and culture, and society and politics. Its advantage over other textbooks is its focus on contemporary digital media and cultures. A significant number of the chapters relate to the hacktivist movement Anonymous and contemporary events like the Arab Spring and Citizen Journalism.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2017). The Digital Media Reader: Media, Culture, Society an Politics in the Digital Age. The Crocels Press Limited, Swansea, GB.

Developing and Validating the “This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale”: Optimising Political Online Communities for Internet Trolling

Developing and Validating the “This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale”: Optimising Political Online Communities for Internet Trolling

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Internet trolling describes the posting of any content on the Internet which is provocative or offensive, which is different from the original meaning online in the 1990s, referring to the posting of messages for humourous effect. Those systems operators (sysops) who run online communities are being targeted because of abuse posted on their platforms. Political discussion groups are some of the most prone to trolling, whether consensual or unwanted. Many such websites ara open for anyone to join, meaning when some members post messages they know are offensive but legal, others might find grossly offensive, meaning these messages could be illegal. This paper develops a questionnaire called the This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale (TIWWCHNT-20), which aims to help sysops better plan the development of online communities to take account of different users’ capacity to be offended, and for users to self-assess whether they will be suited to an online community. The scale is discussed in relation to different Internet posting techniques where different users will act differently.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2017). Developing and Validating the “This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things Scale”: Optimising Political Online Communities for Internet Trolling. In Y. Ibrahim (Ed.), Politics, Protest, and Empowerment in Digital Spaces (pp. 153-177). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Available at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/developing-and-validating-tiwwchnt-20-scale.pdf

Exploring the Counting of Ballot Papers Using “Delegated Transferable Vote”: Implications for Local and National Elections in the United Kingdom

Exploring the Counting of Ballot Papers Using “Delegated Transferable Vote”: Implications for Local and National Elections in the United Kingdom

Jonathan Bishop and Mark Beech

Abstract

Delegated transferable voting (DTV) refers to an approach to counting votes in elections that extends non-preferential voting systems like First Past The Post (FPTP) to include a transferable element similar to Single Transferable Voting (STV) but instead of voters indicating who they wish their votes to go to on an individual level they entrust that decision in the candidate they vote for, who could be from a small political party that might otherwise be deemed a “wasted vote” under first-past-the-post systems where the candidate they least want could win by having the most votes but still have less than 50% of the popular vote. This chapter discusses how DTV might work in practice through an auto-ethnographic approach in which the authors play an active part in elections in order to test the approach. The elections contested in the UK included to local council level in the Pontypridd area and national elections to the UK Parliament and Welsh Assembly. The potential impact of DTV on these election and method of campaigning used at some of these elections might have had on the voting outcome are discussed.

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Jonathan Bishop & Mark Beech (2017). Exploring the Counting of Ballot Papers Using “Delegated Transferable Vote”: Implications for Local and National Elections in the United Kingdom. In Y. Ibrahim (Ed.), Politics, Protest, and Empowerment in Digital Spaces (pp. 227-243). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Available online: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/counting-ballot-papers-using-dtv.pdf

The role of affective computing for ensuring safety in at-risk educational environments: The development of ‘VoisJet’ and ‘VoisEye’ for forensic phonetical analysis

The role of affective computing for ensuring safety in at-risk educational environments: The development of ‘VoisJet’ and ‘VoisEye’ for forensic phonetical analysis

Jonathan Bishop and Darren Bellenger

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This paper presents an introduction to the use of affective computing in at-risk educational environments, such as those that schools located in areas where there is armed conflict and for the safeguarding of children and at-risk adults more generally. This paper has discussed the improvement of the EigenFace based facial emotion recognition by continually streamlining the facial dataset used and its application in at-risk educational environments. One of these mimics the authors’ EigenFaces library and appears to have better performance in poor lighting and poor camera situations, making it possibly better for drone use. It is therefore paramount that as the authors develop the system further that they keep each component separate, in case it is decided to utilise commercial libraries (e.g. Microsoft Project Oxford) for certain aspects. A structure such as VoisOver that allows for third party technologies to be plugged in would mean the authors’ code can remain separate from that of third party plug-ins, namely specific algorithms for identifying the core 12 emotion sets the authors have devised in contexts that might not even have been considered yet. Such algorithms could work with the system described in this paper to make its operation in at-risk educational environments even more possible.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop and Darren Bellenger (2016). The role of affective computing for ensuring safety in at-risk educational environments: The development of ‘VoisJet’ and ‘VoisEye’ for forensic phonetical analysis. The 2016 International Conference on Computational Science and Computational Intelligence (CSCI’2016). 15-17 December 2016, Las Vegas, NV. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/affective-computing-for-ensuring-safety-in-at-risk-educational-environments.pdf