Category Archives: Selivcel Digest

Managing sysop prerogative in Europe through fabris dualism: An agenda for reform of the European Union and Council of Europe into international organisations

Managing sysop prerogative in Europe through fabris dualism: An agenda for reform of the European Union and Council of Europe into international organisations

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The European Union referendum on the 23 June 2016 in the United Kingdom was reported as being the most significant plebiscite for over a generation. Its impacts may only become most apparent when the citizens of the United Kingdom start to demand the same rights that those in the countries that have remained a member of the European Union enjoy. This paper looks at the impact leaving the European Union will have for the United Kingdom in terms of ‘sysop prerogative’ – the right or lack of for information society service providers to do what they want when administering their websites as systems operators, or sysops. The paper argues that a lack of harmonization of laws across Europe will make enforcing sysop prerogative and indeed the very nature of it, more difficult. Even with the outcome of the EU referendum affecting only the United Kingdom, this paper argues that in order to secure a cyberspace free from crime that global cooperation is still needed, but that the European Union in its current form might not be the appropriate vehicle at all, with a combination of the United Nations, Nato and the Council of Europe being more suitable.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2016). Managing sysop prerogative in Europe through fabris dualism: An agenda for reform of the European Union and Council of Europe into international organisations. The International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 3(1). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/managing-sysop-prerogative-in-europe-through-fabris-dualism.pdf

My name is Robin Hood: Comparing pseudonym use in crime records and popular culture during the reigns of John I, Henry III and Edward I with Cyberspace

My name is Robin Hood: Comparing pseudonym use in crime records and popular culture during the reigns of John I, Henry III and Edward I with Cyberspace

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

It is known that one of the earliest references to Robin Hood is the literary work, ‘Piers Plowman.’ For centuries scholars have tried to find out who the real Robin Hood was. At present many are willing to accept that Robin Hood was no more than a myth. Whilst this paper does not seek to disagree with that consensus, it aims to show that the use of pseudonyms during the reigns of King John I, King Henry III and Edward I, seeks as much association with this myth at this time as pseudonym use in Cyberspace does today.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (In Press). My name is Robin Hood: Comparing pseudonym use in crime records and popular culture during the reigns of John I, Henry III and Edward I with Cyberspace. The International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 4(1)

Internet Trolling and Other Cyberlaw Issues in the UK and the International Arena

Internet Trolling and Other Cyberlaw Issues in the UK and the International Arena

Jonathan Bishop

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2013). Internet Trolling and Other Cyberlaw Issues in the UK and the International Arena. In: D.H. Goldhush, T.F. Claypoole; J.K. Sherwood; C. Bal; J. Bishop (Eds.) Understanding Developments in Cyberspace Law. Aspatore Books: Boston, MA.

The role of affective computing and multimedia forensics for proving ‘common law rape’ and ‘delict paternity’ by persistent misusers of e-dating services

The role of affective computing and multimedia forensics for proving ‘common law rape’ and ‘delict paternity’ by persistent misusers of e-dating services

Jonathan Bishop

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). The role of affective computing and multimedia forensics for proving ‘common law rape’ and ‘delict paternity’ by persistent misusers of e-dating services. The International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 2(2)

Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews

Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Designing an effective organisational architecture for an undertaking can be considered essential to its success. The way an organisation is designed – or otherwise appears to its workers – will affect the extent to which those workers associated with it can be effective at their jobs. This chapter undertakes a case study using Big Data from a project called “QPress” that was run by an organisation that is based around contingent working and inter-professionalism. Important things drawn from the data collected from the study include the importance of the Cloud to distance working, such as teleworking; the identity of the organisation and how workers relate to it; as well as what factors assist or inhibit worker motivation. The study concludes that the organisational structure of the organisation investigated – where different firms perform different tasks could be seen as best practice in supporting inter-professional environments.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Supporting crowd-funded agile software development projects using contingent working: Exploring Big Data from participatory design documentation and interviews. The International Conference on Information and Knowledge Engineering (IKE’15).

Avoiding Adverse Consequences from Digital Addiction and Retaliatory Feedback: The Role of the Participation Continuum

Avoiding Adverse Consequences from Digital Addiction and Retaliatory Feedback: The Role of the Participation Continuum

Ashu M.G. Solo and Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter looks at the role of the participation continuum in helping to improve relationships that have been damaged as a result of digital addiction. Digital addiction in this context refers to what happens when a person with a compulsion who is not getting that compulsion fulfilled turns to the Internet and other digital technologies in order to fill the void. The chapter is a case study of two people called Person D and Person G in order to make them anonymous. Using medical and other records, it was found that a number of different interventions using the participation continuum could have resulted in changes in the relationship in either holding it together or preventing one party from posting malicious and defamatory comments. The chapter found that a theoretical model, with algorithmic principles applied, called the transitional flow of persuasion model would be able to understand the impacts of digital addiction and provide a means to remedy it.

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Avoiding Adverse Consequences from Digital Addiction and Retaliatory Feedback: The Role of the Participatio… by Jonathan Bishop

Reference

Ashu M. G. Solo & Jonathan Bishop (2015). Avoiding Adverse Consequences from Digital Addiction and Retaliatory Feedback: The Role of the Participation Continuum. In J. Bishop (Ed.), Psychological and Social Implications Surrounding Internet and Gaming Addiction (pp. 62-77). IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://www.jonathanbishop.com/Library/Documents/EN/docIGIPaper_AddictionRetaliatoryFeedback.pdf

The Thin-Blue Web: Police Crime Records of Internet Trolling Show Chivalrous Attitudes That Can Be Resolved through Transfer of Powers

The Thin-Blue Web: Police Crime Records of Internet Trolling Show Chivalrous Attitudes That Can Be Resolved through Transfer of Powers

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter using an empirical data-driven approach to investigate crime recording logs of South Wales Police relating to Internet trolling by and towards different sexes. The chapter finds more favourable attitudes towards women as victims in even the most trivial of cases. It finds male victims of trolling are only treated as victims when a form of unwanted face-to-face encounter is needed for action. The chapter shows transferring police powers to local authorities, can cut the cost of community policing by 50% across the board and eliminate sexist attitudes also. The chapter finds that the way social media platforms are exercising ‘sysop prerogative’ where they have no right to – such as not passing over account information on alleged defamers – puts a huge burden on police resources. Using local authorities, which have many of the same powers as the police and indeed more, can resolve problems without the need to criminalise offenders.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2015). The Thin-Blue Web: Police Crime Records of Internet Trolling Show Chivalrous Attitudes That Can Be Resolved through Transfer of Powers. In P. Thomas, M. Srihari, & S. Kaur (Eds.) Handbook of Research on Cultural and Economic Impacts of the Information Society (pp. 67-91), IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-thin-blue-web-police-crime-records-of-internet-trolling-show-chivalrous-attitudes-that-can-be-resolved-through-transfer-of-powers.pdf

Using “On-the-Fly Corpus Linguistics” to Systematically Derive Word Definitions Using Inductive Abstraction and Reductionist Correlation Analysis: Considering Seductive and Gratifying Properties of Computer Jargon

Using “On-the-Fly Corpus Linguistics” to Systematically Derive Word Definitions Using Inductive Abstraction and Reductionist Correlation Analysis: Considering Seductive and Gratifying Properties of Computer Jargon

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Computer jargon is something that can either unite people, or draw them apart. This chapter looks at definitions of the terms, ‘trolling,’ ‘flame,’ ‘flame-war’ and ‘lurking,’ as presented in specialist dictionaries, newspapers and through a survey of laypersons. The aim of the chapter was to see whether it was possible to objectively define terms using a quantitative analysis of qualitative data. The study finds that objectively determining a definition of a term requires a bigger dataset than is used for qualitative studies. It further notes that whilst there is a lot in common with expert definitions, the problem with drawing definitions from others is that whilst it might produce objective definitions they might not be accurate ones.

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Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2015). On-the-Fly Corpus Linguistics” to Systematically Derive Word Definitions Using Inductive Abstraction and Reductionist Correlation Analysis: Considering Seductive and Gratifying Properties of Computer Jargon. In: Jonathan Bishop (Ed.) Psychological and Social Implications Surrounding Internet and Gaming Addiction. IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/using-on-the-fly-corpus-linguistics-to-systematically-derive-word-definitions-using-inductive-abstraction-and-reducationist-correlation-analysis.pdf

The Need for a Dualist Application of Public and Private Law in Great Britain Following the Use of “Flame Trolling” During the 2011 UK Riots: A Review and Model

The Need for a Dualist Application of Public and Private  Law in Great Britain Following  the Use of “Flame Trolling”  During the 2011 UK Riots: A Review and Model

Mugabi Ivan and Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Since time immemorial, the legal systems of Great Britain have often been spoken of highly as pinnacles of democracy. However, the split between criminal law and tort law have often caused problems where the police has often focused on the prosecution of people in poverty and where only the wealthy can afford to use the system. This chapter discusses the extent and limitations of existing measures to tackle computer-related crime, particularly with regards to the abusive kind of Internet Trolling, namely “flame trolling.” The chapter recommends further research to establish whether it should be the case that in a society based on dualism that criminal and civil cases should be held at the same time, and that in both instances those being accused of an offence or tort should be allowed to bring a counter-claim. It is discussed that in such a system the cases that would be brought are where there is a clear victim who had no part in the offence against them, such as murder, rape, theft and burglary, which are usually carefully planned and orchestrated acts.

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Reference

Ivan Mugabi and Jonathan Bishop (2015). The Need for a Dualist  Application of Public and Private  Law in Great Britain Following  the Use of “Flame Trolling”  During the 2011 UK Riots: A Review and Model. In: Maurice Dawson & Marwan Omar (Eds.).  New Threats and  Countermeasures in  Digital Crime and Cyber  Terrorism. Hershey, PA: IGI Global. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-need-for-a-dualism-application-of-public-and-private-law-in-great-britain-following-the-use-of-flame-trolling-during-the-2011-uk-riots.pdf

Review: Bromley’s Family Law by Nigel Lowe and Gillian Douglas

Review: Bromley’s Family Law by Nigel Lowe and Gillian Douglas

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Bromley’s Family Law is a long established core text for students of family law, and this 2015 edition was an attempt to update it. In terms of contemporary issues like Internet trolling and digital addiction, the authors of the book, Nigel Lowe and Gillian Douglas, fail to capture any of the implications contemporary technologies and cultures have had on family law. The absence of discussion of social media, particularly how Crown Prosecution Service guidance relating to it can impact on the enforcement of court orders and the treatment of children and those lacking maturity, is concerning. If one takes a traditional approach to family law this might be a worthwhile textbook, but on any programme looking for how technology has impacted on family law, it is not suitable for the age we are in.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Review: Bromley’s Family Law by Nigel Lowe and Gillian Douglas. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 2(1), pp.47-51. Available at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/bromleys-family-law-by-nigel-lowe-and-gillian-douglas.pdf