Category Archives: IJITOP Papers

e-minters Online Social Architects: Recognition of Informal Learning in Communities of Interest

e-minters Online Social Architects: Recognition of Informal Learning in Communities of Interest

Niki Lambropoulos

Abstract

As an attempt for informal learning recognition in online Communities of Interest, theory in this chapter was extracted from a dialogue between the members of the e-mint community on lurkers, newcomers and online groupz-ware. Twenty-eight e-mint members offered practical insights for usability and sociability issues towards online communities. Additional theoretical support to the concepts is provided based on social psychology, education, management and communication studies. The theoretical framework that supports Informal Learning and Communities of Interest draws on late 19th century and middle 20th century theories as these were the eras of new approaches related to masses’ interaction. A new methodological framework for data extraction and data analysis is introduced using software-based Social Network Analysis and Content Analysis, on the cluster of messages about lurkers, newcomers and the features of online groupz-ware.

Citation

Niki Lambropoulos (In Press). e-minters Online Social Architects: Recognition of Informal Learning in Communities of Interest. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation.

“Wikipedia is not…”: The misuse of sysop prerogative in policy-driven online communities

“Wikipedia is not…”: The misuse of sysop prerogative in policy-driven online communities

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Sysop prerogative is the principle that a website administrator can do anything which they have not been prevented from doing so by statute or said they won’t do by contract. In many online communities, such as Wikipedia, sysops will encode their rules into policies for others to follow. On platforms like Wikipedia, however, it is possible for users to claim that certain aspects of their sysops’ policies support their position and if those users have enough support they will be able to force a set of circumstances to suit their biases even though the rules do not permit those actions. This paper investigates the way that the skeptic movement abuses Wikipedia’s policies to dilute from its articles those who criticise the movement or figures within it. The paper finds that if someone is disliked by enough users on Wikipedia or does not have enough support from other users, they will face behaviours that go against Wikipedia’s rules, yet which they are outnumbered in being able to challenge.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (In Press). “Wikipedia is not…”: The misuse of sysop prerogative in policy-driven online communities. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation.

Managing sysop prerogative in Europe through fabris dualism: An agenda for reform of the European Union and Council of Europe into international organisations

Managing sysop prerogative in Europe through fabris dualism: An agenda for reform of the European Union and Council of Europe into international organisations

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The European Union referendum on the 23 June 2016 in the United Kingdom was reported as being the most significant plebiscite for over a generation. Its impacts may only become most apparent when the citizens of the United Kingdom start to demand the same rights that those in the countries that have remained a member of the European Union enjoy. This paper looks at the impact leaving the European Union will have for the United Kingdom in terms of ‘sysop prerogative’ – the right or lack of for information society service providers to do what they want when administering their websites as systems operators, or sysops. The paper argues that a lack of harmonization of laws across Europe will make enforcing sysop prerogative and indeed the very nature of it, more difficult. Even with the outcome of the EU referendum affecting only the United Kingdom, this paper argues that in order to secure a cyberspace free from crime that global cooperation is still needed, but that the European Union in its current form might not be the appropriate vehicle at all, with a combination of the United Nations, Nato and the Council of Europe being more suitable.

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Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2016). Managing sysop prerogative in Europe through fabris dualism: An agenda for reform of the European Union and Council of Europe into international organisations. The International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 3(1). Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/managing-sysop-prerogative-in-europe-through-fabris-dualism.pdf

The Robin Hood Character Test Online and on Paper: An accurate personality assessment tool or a case of the Forer Effect?

The Robin Hood Character Test Online and on Paper: An accurate personality assessment tool or a case of the Forer Effect?

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The Robin Hood legends have spread throughout the world in many different centuries, perhaps even more so in the 20th and 21st centuries due to the Internet. The Robin Hood Character Test, which spread around offices in paper format in the 1980s has seen a resurgence in the 21st century due to its posting to personality websites and weblogs. The test claims to be able to accurately predict someone’s personality though asking them to place the characters in the story they are asked to read in the order they most value their behaviour. This study finds that the perceived accuracy of this test can be put down to the Farer Effect and also finds that the Forer Effect is more apparent when the test is conducted online than when it is conducted on paper.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (In Press). The Robin Hood Character Test Online and on Paper: An accurate personality assessment tool or a case of the Forer Effect? International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation.

Ranulf de Blondeville – First Lord of the Trolls

Ranulf de Blondeville – First Lord of the Trolls

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Ranulf de Blondeville was the 6th Earl of Chester and 1st Earl of Lincoln. He is famously referred to alongside Robin Hood in Piers Plowman. Ranulf has been portrayed as a trouble-maker with a strong independent streak. This paper compares Ranulf with contemporary Internet trolls. This involves looking at not only how Ranulf III of Chester’s activities compare with Internet trolls, but also how many of the Robin Hood legends might emanate from the activities and stories associated with this particular Ranulf Earl of Chester.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (In Press). Ranulf de Blondeville – First Lord of the Trolls. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation.

My name is Robin Hood: Comparing pseudonym use in crime records and popular culture during the reigns of John I, Henry III and Edward I with Cyberspace

My name is Robin Hood: Comparing pseudonym use in crime records and popular culture during the reigns of John I, Henry III and Edward I with Cyberspace

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

It is known that one of the earliest references to Robin Hood is the literary work, ‘Piers Plowman.’ For centuries scholars have tried to find out who the real Robin Hood was. At present many are willing to accept that Robin Hood was no more than a myth. Whilst this paper does not seek to disagree with that consensus, it aims to show that the use of pseudonyms during the reigns of King John I, King Henry III and Edward I, seeks as much association with this myth at this time as pseudonym use in Cyberspace does today.

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (In Press). My name is Robin Hood: Comparing pseudonym use in crime records and popular culture during the reigns of John I, Henry III and Edward I with Cyberspace. The International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 4(1)

Conceptualising Network Politics following the Arab Spring: An African Perspective

Conceptualising Network Politics following the Arab Spring: An African Perspective

Ashu M.G. Solo and Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Network politics is examined in the context of the Arab Spring. Network politics refers to politics and networks. These networks include the Internet, private networks, cellular networks, telephone networks, radio networks, television networks, etc. Network politics includes the applications of networks to enable one or more individuals or organizations to engage in political communication. Furthermore, network politics includes government regulation of networks. Finally, network politics includes the accompanying issues that arise when networks are used for political communication or when there is government regulation of networks. The domain of network politics includes, but is not limited to, e-politics (social networking for driving revolutions and organizing protests, online petitions, political blogs and vlogs, whistleblower Web sites, online campaigning, e-participation, virtual town halls, evoting, Internet freedom, access to information, net neutrality, etc.) and applications of other networks in politics (robocalling, text messaging, TV broadcasting, etc.). The definition of this field should significantly increase the pace of research and development in this important field.

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Citation

Ashu M.G. Solo & Jonathan Bishop (2014). Conceptualising Network Politics following the Arab Spring: An African Perspective. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 1(1), 23-28.

The Guy Fawkes Mask as Visual Communication of the Internet Group Anonymous

The Guy Fawkes Mask as Visual Communication of the Internet Group Anonymous

Lars Konzack

Abstract

The Guy Fawkes mask has become a symbol of the internet group Anonymous. This paper seeks to understand why this happened. The Guy Fawkes Mask takes us back to a 17th Century Catholic renegade, a 1980s graphic novel, a millennial movie based on the graphic novel, social media visual communication practicing internet memes on 4chan and YouTube, and physical demonstrations in public space. It will show how the Guy Fawkes Mask changed meaning during this process, and how this symbol works as a meaningful signifier in a digital age.

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Citation

  • Lars Konzack, (2014). The Guy Fawkes Mask as Visual Communication of the Internet Group Anonymous. The International Journal of Trolling and Online Participation 1(2), pp.53-68

 

Foreword for the Special Issue on Anonymous

Foreword for the Special Issue on Anonymous

Niki Lambropoulos

Abstract

This special issue on Anonymous brings together and important collection of papers on the topic. To date, much information on the Anonymous movement has been retrievable only through secondary sources, like Wikipedia and newsprint. Whilst in some cases the authors have needed to refer to these, this special issue is one of the first authoritative accounts of works on Anonymous, focussing mainly on original empirical investigation into original sources such as Encyclopedia Dramatica and the synthesising of established literature.

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Citation

Niki Lambropoulos (2014). Foreword for the Special Issue on Anonymous. The International Journal of Trolling and Online Participation 1(2), pp.1-2. Available online at http://research.crocels.com/research/1569/foreword-for-the-special-issue-on-anonymous-niki-lambropoulos/

Review: Do It Like a Woman by Caroline Criado-Perez

Review: Do It Like a Woman by Caroline Criado-Perez

Jeremy McDonagh

Abstract

Do It Like A Woman (and change the world) is part of a contemporary wave of populist feminist writing which also includes How To Be a Woman (Caitlin Moran, 2012), Bad Feminist (Roxane Gay, 2014), Men Explain Things to Me (Rebecca Solnit, 2014), Not That Kind of Girl (Lena Dunham, 2014), and We Should All Be Feminists (Chimamanda Ngozi, 2014). Where Criado-Perez differs from her peers is in choosing not to write from a first-person perspective, despite the personal experiences that inspired the book, and instead bringing together a collection of stories from over 25 different sources to carry her theme.

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Citation

Jeremy McDonagh (2015). Review: Do It Like a Woman by Caroline Criado-Perez. International Journal of Internet Trolling and Online Participation 2(1), pp.39-46. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/do-it-like-a-woman-by-caroline-criado-perez.pdf