Category Archives: Glamorgan Summer School 2016

Increasing The Economic Sustainability Of Online Communities: An Empirical Investigation

Increasing The Economic Sustainability Of Online Communities: An Empirical Investigation

Jonathan Bishop

Citations

Jonathan Bishop (2012). Increasing The Economic Sustainability Of Online Communities: An Empirical Investigation. M.O. Parker and A.D. Petrov (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Sociology Research. Nova Science Publishers. New York, NY. (pages 667-674)
Jonathan Bishop (2009). Increasing The Economic Sustainability Of Online Communities: An Empirical Investigation. Mildred F. Hindsworth and Trevor B. Lang (Eds.) Community Participation and Empowerment. Nova Science Publishers. New York, NY. (pages 349-362)

Sex and age biases in Tweets relating to the 2015 migration crisis

Sex and age biases in Tweets relating to the 2015 migration crisis

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The 2015 migration crisis arose out of the interference of Western government in the affairs of countries affected by the Arab Spring Uprisings. Attitudes towards immigration can be very strong, with even UK Prime Minister David Cameron describing the increased asylum applications as a result of his failed foreign policies a “swarm.” This talk looks at how attitudes towards immigration have been expressed on Twitter and the extent to which sex and age biases shape or otherwise the moral compass of those in the Twittersphere.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Sex and age biases in Tweets relating to the 2015 migration crisis. Diaspora Beyond Nationalism Conference. 16 September 2015. Cardiff University, Cardiff, GB.

The Impacts of Alcohol on E-Dating Activity: Increases in Flame Trolling Corresponds with Higher Alcohol Consumption

The Impacts of Alcohol on E-Dating Activity: Increases in Flame Trolling Corresponds with Higher Alcohol Consumption

Jason Barratt and Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

The impact of alcohol on Internet use is relatively unexplored. This chapter presents the results of a study conducted over a period of 1 year, which investigated whether persons who stated on their e-dating profile that they drank alcohol were more or less likely to contact another person. The study found that increased consumption of alcohol resulted in a person posting more flames (i.e. abusive posts) to their target. No such difference existed in terms of whether a person drank alcohol in relation to whether they had a low education, spoke more about themselves, their target, or whether they posted kudos to their targets. The chapter concludes that further research is needed to uncover the effects of alcohol on participation in social networking services, so that young people, like Liam Stacey and Isabella Sorley are not unfairly targeted for Internet trolling.

Full Text

Reference

Jason Barratt and Jonathan Bishop (2015). The Impacts of Alcohol on E-Dating Activity: Increases in Flame Trolling Corresponds with Higher Alcohol Consumption. In J. Bishop (Ed.), Psychological and Social Implications Surrounding Internet and Gaming Addiction (pp. 186-197). IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-impacts-of-alcohol-on-e-dating-activity.pdf

The Thin-Blue Web: Police Crime Records of Internet Trolling Show Chivalrous Attitudes That Can Be Resolved through Transfer of Powers

The Thin-Blue Web: Police Crime Records of Internet Trolling Show Chivalrous Attitudes That Can Be Resolved through Transfer of Powers

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

This chapter using an empirical data-driven approach to investigate crime recording logs of South Wales Police relating to Internet trolling by and towards different sexes. The chapter finds more favourable attitudes towards women as victims in even the most trivial of cases. It finds male victims of trolling are only treated as victims when a form of unwanted face-to-face encounter is needed for action. The chapter shows transferring police powers to local authorities, can cut the cost of community policing by 50% across the board and eliminate sexist attitudes also. The chapter finds that the way social media platforms are exercising ‘sysop prerogative’ where they have no right to – such as not passing over account information on alleged defamers – puts a huge burden on police resources. Using local authorities, which have many of the same powers as the police and indeed more, can resolve problems without the need to criminalise offenders.

Full Text

Reference

Jonathan Bishop (2015). The Thin-Blue Web: Police Crime Records of Internet Trolling Show Chivalrous Attitudes That Can Be Resolved through Transfer of Powers. In P. Thomas, M. Srihari, & S. Kaur (Eds.) Handbook of Research on Cultural and Economic Impacts of the Information Society (pp. 67-91), IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/the-thin-blue-web-police-crime-records-of-internet-trolling-show-chivalrous-attitudes-that-can-be-resolved-through-transfer-of-powers.pdf

Ivan Mugabi

Ivan Mugabi is a lawyer by professional background with three degrees in law. Holding a master’s degree in Human Rights law (LLM Human Rights law), his enthusiasm for research stretched from my second year of the law school, when he embarked on a legal internship with a Law Chamber with senior Advocates. This exposed him to research skills and he gained in depth knowledge of both the substantive and procedural aspects more especially from the context of the administrative law perspective. He also embraced a research project towards the climax of my first Master’s degree at the University of South Wales.

Determining the Risk of Digital Addiction to Adolescent Targets of Internet Trolling: Implications for the UK Legal System

Determining the Risk of Digital Addiction to Adolescent Targets of Internet Trolling: Implications for the UK Legal System

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

Research on digital addiction has been increasing significantly since the start of the 2010s. What is not currently available is a measurement scale to assess the extent to which adolescents are at risk of abuse on the Internet that might lead them to develop digital addiction. This chapter sets out to develop a check-list that can be used to risk assess those youths who might be at risk of digital addiction. Through using data from a study into 1,828 young people aged 9-16, the study devised a 6-point check-list based on using a t-test to determine those at high risk and those at low risk. The check-list can be seen as a reliable way for screening those adolescents for whom concerns are raised over their online activities. The chapter concludes that further research will be needed to test the scale with people in older age ranges.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Determining the Risk of Digital Addiction to Adolescent Targets of Internet Trolling: Implications for the UK Legal System. In J. Bishop (Ed.), Psychological and Social Implications Surrounding Internet and Gaming Addiction (pp. 31-42). IGI Global, Hershey, PA. Available online at: http://resources.crocels.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/4/determining-the-risk-of-digital-addiction-to-adolescent-targets-of-internet-trolling.pdf

Participation Transformation in Online Communities: From Lurker to Poster

Participation Transformation in Online Communities: From Lurker to Poster

Jonathan Bishop

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop. Participation Transformation in Online Communities: From Lurker to Poster. Transformations Conference. Cardiff University.

Trolls Just Want To Have Fun: Electronic Aggression within the Context of e-Participation and Other Online Political Behaviour in the United Kingdom

Trolls Just Want To Have Fun: Electronic Aggression within the Context of e-Participation and Other Online Political Behaviour in the United Kingdom

Shefali Virkar

Abstract

Over the last two decades, public confidence and trust in Government has declined visibly in several Western liberal democracies owing to a distinct lack of opportunities for citizen participation in political processes; and has instead given way instead to disillusionment with current political institutions, actors, and practices. The rise of the Internet as a global communications medium and the advent of digital platforms has opened up huge opportunities and raised new challenges for public institutions and agencies, with digital technology creating new forms of community; empowering citizens and reforming existing power structures in a way that has rendered obsolete or inappropriate many of the tools and processes of traditional democratic politics. Through an analysis of the No. 10 Downing Street ePetitions Initiative based in the United Kingdom, this article seeks to engage with issues related to the innovative use of network technology by Government to involve citizens in policy processes within existing democratic frameworks in order to improve administration, to reform democratic processes, and to renew citizen trust in institutions of governance. In particular, the work seeks to examine whether the application of the new Information and Communication Technologies to participatory democracy in the Government 2.0 era would eventually lead to radical transformations in government functioning, policymaking, and the body politic, or merely to modest, unspectacular political reform and to the emergence of technology-based, obsessive-compulsive pathologies and Internet-based trolling behaviours amongst individuals in society.

Full Text

Reference

Shefali Virkar (2014). Trolls Just Want to Have Fun: Electronic Aggression Within the Context of e-Participation and Other Online Political Behaviour in the United Kingdom’, International Journal of E-Politics (Special Issue), Volume 5, Issue 4, pp. 20-50.

The Misrepresentation of Digital Teens as Trolls: Considering Political, News and Feminist Agendas

The Misrepresentation of Digital Teens as Trolls: Considering Political, News and Feminist Agendas

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

If one pays attention to popular culture and the mass media, Internet trolls are unemployed young men in their 20s at home in their parents’ basement spending their time posting abusive messages online. This study finds that this stereotype, whilst common in the mass media, is not representative of the empirical data collected. The research found that most trolling on blogs and defriending is done by women and because of other women. It finds that the people who troll are unlikely to be youths not in education, employment or training (NEETs), but more likely to be those in wealthy areas who are bored. It equally finds that those who troll, or indeed troll-call, are likely to show the symptoms of antisocial personality disorder and histrionic personality disorder respectively. With the media focussing on represent young people as trolls, the research finds that the existence of benevolent sexism in the police perpetuates this myth, meaning women are getting more favourably treatment, either as trolls or troll-callers. In fact the research finds trolls are as likely to be men or women, and they will change the way they troll based on their target, meaning feminists deemed misandrist will face sexist posts including from women, but the same trolls, regardless of their sex, would have used racist remarks if the feminists calling for more rights for women were Black and calling for more rights for Black people. The research concludes that deterring trolling requires a community-led approach, where local government can use their law enforcement powers, such as to issue fixed penalty notices or anti-social behaviour orders, against those trolls they can prove took part in trolling by using their surveillance rights.

Full Text

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). The Misrepresentation of Digital Teens as Trolls: Considering Political, News and Feminist Agendas. Invited Speech to the 13th International Conference on E-Society (E-Society 2015), Madeira, Portugal, 14-16 March 2015.

Crowdfunding WordPress plugins – The case of QPress

Crowdfunding WordPress plugins – The case of QPress

Jonathan Bishop

Abstract

I have been conducting research into crowd-funding of WordPress plugins, which has resulted in many publications. This talk would present a case study of the crowd-funding of QPress, an almost complete WordPress plugin. The study has looked at various geographical factors in the advertising of crowd-funded projects, finding that advertising should be fixed to locations where clicks on adverts are not done to raise funds for the websites they are displayed on. It finds clearly that crowd funded projects need to be agile – built in several stages – and involve contingent working – where people only work on it when funds exist.

Presentation

Citation

Jonathan Bishop (2015). Crowdfunding WordPress plugins – The case of QPress. WordCamp Birmingham. 8 February 2015.